LinuxQuestions.org
Visit Jeremy's Blog.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 12-17-2011, 07:05 PM   #1
drevolution
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Posts: 1

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Smile New JOB no CentOS experience please help. Few questions.


Recently was hired to work as systems admin. I was told they were windows based operation but it seems they are migrating to CentOS. I have done few install but nothing major. Your help will be appreciated helping me keep my job as well as remember few task.

1 how to install programs. dont remember. I know ther are steps to do this but have no Idea. I want to install a simple app from the web and I can't even do this. Please help xchat is one of those apps.

2. How to setup remote desktop to Centos Server from windows machines.

3. Should Centos be install first or virtual software like XEN or VMware?

Your help is appreciated.
I know it seems incredible to have to go from a windows based to LINUX based systems but at this time I need a job and I will do whatever it takes to provide for the time being to my love ones. Trust me I am thinking on a new job if this doesn't work out I just dont want to give up without trying.

Last edited by drevolution; 12-17-2011 at 07:07 PM.
 
Old 12-17-2011, 08:18 PM   #2
hf2046
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Distribution: Slack64
Posts: 111

Rep: Reputation: 20
My suggestion is for you to visit:

http://wiki.centos.org/Documentation

And start reading.

Good luck!
 
Old 12-18-2011, 09:33 AM   #3
johnsfine
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Distribution: Centos
Posts: 5,286

Rep: Reputation: 1190Reputation: 1190Reputation: 1190Reputation: 1190Reputation: 1190Reputation: 1190Reputation: 1190Reputation: 1190Reputation: 1190
Quote:
Originally Posted by drevolution View Post
1 how to install programs. dont remember. I know ther are steps to do this but have no Idea. I want to install a simple app from the web and I can't even do this. .. xchat is one of those apps
Always check first to see if the application you want (or an equivalent) is available in the Centos repositories. It is much easier and better to install an application from the repositories than "from the web".

xchat is available from the base repository in at least the version of Centos I use, so as root you could simply
Code:
yum install xchat
Centos (maybe depending on version) has a GUI package manager for installing apps from its repositories. In my experience, that GUI is so lame it is not worth using.

Read some documentation on the yum program and get some practice using it. It is a command line program that can be used to find out what is available from the repositories, install what you want, and update any apps that may have newer versions since you installed.

If the ap you want is not available from the repository, often there is an rpm file. I forget how you install from rpm file in Centos, but that should be easy to find. That is a lot easier than installing from source code. But there are lots of ways to hit library (.so file) incompatibilities when installing from rpm, that you won't hit when installing from source. So you may need to install from source.

Almost all open source projects have downloads and instructions that assume you will install from source. But there is very little consistency from project to project in what you need to do to install from source. It takes a lot of experience to look at the usually confusing readme files or other instructions from the project and figure out what you actually need to do to install from source. Once you've done that, subsequent library updates might break what you did. So installing from source should be your last choice.

Finding the ap you want or an equivalent in a compatible repository and installing it with yum is the only good choice.

For each version of Centos, there are some Centos repositories enabled by default and there are some compatible or semi compatible repositories (often associated with Fedora) that you can enable for a wider range of available aps.

Last edited by johnsfine; 12-18-2011 at 09:35 AM.
 
Old 12-18-2011, 09:58 AM   #4
johnsfine
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Dec 2007
Distribution: Centos
Posts: 5,286

Rep: Reputation: 1190Reputation: 1190Reputation: 1190Reputation: 1190Reputation: 1190Reputation: 1190Reputation: 1190Reputation: 1190Reputation: 1190
Quote:
Originally Posted by drevolution View Post
2. How to setup remote desktop to Centos Server from windows machines.
I'm never certain what people mean by "from" and "to" in questions like that.

I will guess you mean you want to use the keyboard, mouse and display on a Windows desktop system to operate applications that are running on a Centos system that is elsewhere on your LAN.

Linux has some support for the Windows remote desktop protocol. But that is probably not a good choice for you, unless you have a really strong need to avoid adding new software to the Windows desktop system.

1) For text only (non GUI) applications on Linux, it is a lot easier and more efficient to use some SSH client to create a terminal window on Windows that connects to a text mode shell on Centos. There are many available SSH clients for Windows. The one I prefer is putty, which is part of the cygwin collection of unix-like utilities for Windows.

2) For operating Linux GUI applications from Windows, my usual choice is VNC. Before talking much about VNC, you should understand an important terminology difference between X (the basic graphics system in Linux) and VNC:
An X "server" is the end of X nearer the keyboard/display. An X "client" is the end nearer the application.
A VNC "server" is the end of VNC nearer the application. A VNC "client" is the end nearer the keyboard/display.

So a typical use of VNC involves two VNC programs (that you need to download and install): A Linux program that acts as both a VNC server and an X server. A Windows program that acts as a VNC client. So end to end you have a Windows VNC client talk to a Linux VNC server that is also a Linux X server that talks to a Linux X client that is part of a Linux GUI application. You can install the Centos vnc server with yum. There are several different freeware Windows vnc clients you can find and download.

To use vnc, you first need something on the Linux end to give a vnc server command that creates a Linux virtual desktop connected to the vnc server, typically already logged in as a specific user, and gives a vnc password to that desktop. You could have some automatic scripting on the Centos system create those desktops. We usually have individual users when they need such a desktop log into the Centos system via putty, and issue their own command to create their own virtual desktop. Then the user run the Windows vnc client and connects to the virtual desktop (giving the password the desktop was created with) and then uses it.

3) It takes less setup to use X directly without VNC. I generally find that is a bit less robust and less efficient (uses more LAN bandwidth for the same graphics operations), but your results may be different.

You can download and install an X server for Windows (remember "server" is the side of X closer to the keyboard/display). The xwin program in cygwin is one good choice.

An X server on Windows can be setup so it uses a virtual desktop program on Linux (such as KDE or GNOME) to contain all the GUI applications, so the effect looks much the same as VNC. The entire Linux virtual desktop is a window within the Windows desktop.

An X server on Windows can be setup to use the Windows desktop program directly, so each Linux GUI app has its own window(s) separately movable and sizeable within the Windows desktop. That mode tends to be more convenient, but trickier to set up and in my experience more likely to malfunction with random glitches.

Last edited by johnsfine; 12-18-2011 at 10:10 AM.
 
Old 12-18-2011, 03:54 PM   #5
jefro
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Posts: 17,101

Rep: Reputation: 2552Reputation: 2552Reputation: 2552Reputation: 2552Reputation: 2552Reputation: 2552Reputation: 2552Reputation: 2552Reputation: 2552Reputation: 2552Reputation: 2552
The simple answer is you use the same idea in windows and linux. So if you know what you want to do in windows you then find out how to do that in linux. Most of the tasks are similar enough to get an idea where to start or how to ask a question.

The long answer is you need to take classes. I doubt you can easily get up to speed any other way.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New forum..just started a job where I'll gain linux experience yuckthefankees LinuxQuestions.org Member Intro 2 10-28-2011 09:49 PM
RedHat, CentOS, Fedora 11 and getting a job in Linux questions linus72 Linux - General 11 07-22-2009 05:11 AM
Newbie Fedora Linux Install Experience. (got questions) borko_b Fedora - Installation 1 01-10-2006 09:56 AM
Fedora IBM A21m Install - Experience & Questions Fattbizkit Fedora 0 03-05-2005 09:47 AM
Some questions before i start my second slack experience nakedjohn Slackware 1 11-25-2003 10:30 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:53 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration