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Old 09-04-2009, 11:51 AM   #1
naceret
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my first experience with ubuntu


i don't want to use windows anymore so i installed ubuntu 8.10 in my pentium 3 1ghz computer, to feel what is like running linux, i'm afraid it might create problems if i will install it in my new assembled pc,everything was working ok but after downloading updates of almost 1G of data, my cd drive, ethernet,sound,usb,etc are no longer working...so i diconected my old computer and use my new pc with windows. you imagine the feeling? that's why others like me are afraid to try other software although we really want to be free from windows. can somebody explain or enlighten me up? thanks
 
Old 09-04-2009, 01:33 PM   #2
ronlau9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by naceret View Post
i don't want to use windows anymore so i installed ubuntu 8.10 in my pentium 3 1ghz computer, to feel what is like running linux, i'm afraid it might create problems if i will install it in my new assembled pc,everything was working ok but after downloading updates of almost 1G of data, my cd drive, ethernet,sound,usb,etc are no longer working...so i diconected my old computer and use my new pc with windows. you imagine the feeling? that's why others like me are afraid to try other software although we really want to be free from windows. can somebody explain or enlighten me up? thanks
First it does not matter which OS you are using updates always can create
a problem.
Because one of the reason of a update is to eliminate a bug , saying so it can creates a bug in its turn.
If you like to stay with UBUNTU why not UBUNTU 9.04 .
Or MINT which is based on UBUNTU .
Best way in my opinion always try it first which a LIVE CD , so you can
try it without installing.
But remember there is no such thing as no risk

Last edited by ronlau9; 09-04-2009 at 01:35 PM.
 
Old 09-04-2009, 02:40 PM   #3
cardboardtoast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by naceret View Post
everything was working ok but after downloading updates of almost 1G of data, my cd drive, ethernet,sound,usb,etc are no longer working...
Did you do them all at once? (a mass update?) I know I have had problems with doing such in the past. (I can only do 10-12 at a time in Vista without hanging, and I normally do things individually/a few at a time for linux)

Just a thought...I haven't used Ubuntu in a while, so I don't know how well it does updates. Also, I agree with ronlau9, why not use the most recent stable version?

Not much else I can say on this...maybe someone can correct me if I'm misspeaking...
 
Old 09-04-2009, 02:42 PM   #4
teebones
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it all depends on the usage. If you're gamer (the latest titles etc), then you will run into problems when running a linux distribution. This is because you cannot natively run .exe files and dx9 dependent files on linux. However there is a workaround that might work: wine. (it's available for free, and commercially through Crossovergames and Cedega. Both commercial versions are tweaked wine releases with some proprietary third party addons.)
Wine let's you run .exe. files and the likes, and has some directX support too. But as mentioned before, the latest games won't run mostly.

Furthermore, you might need some applications, that are not available through Linux versions/equivelants. Check for availability before completely migrating.

Updates, in linux are quite stable/problemless in gereneral. Occasionally some of the updates are infact downgrades, but that's just for the specific application, it mostly doesn't affect the rest.

Some binary based distributions that have quite stable updates are:

Ubuntu (mostly the LTS versions).
Debian (stable)
RedHat ES series (or the free centOS equivelant)

Other distributions have a very short release cycle, 1 each half year. (though they are also good in updates, but i place them here because of the short lifespan of each release)

Fedora
OpenSuSE
Mandriva
Ubuntu (regular version, aka non-LTS)

i don't mention other distributions, because either they are mainly source based and quite difficult for beginners (e.g. slackware/gentoo/arch), or are too new to tell how stable they are on the long run (e.g. mint). (update wise)

Last edited by teebones; 09-04-2009 at 03:29 PM.
 
Old 09-04-2009, 03:03 PM   #5
catkin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teebones View Post
Fedora
OpenSuSE
Mandriva
Ubuntu (non-LTS versions) can go in that list, too.

Generally squeaking, older software is more stable because it has had more bugs fixed. Hence the next LTS version of ubuntu (after 8.04 Hardy) will get more stable as it gets older. It will not be any more stable than a non-LTS version for the first 6 months.

OTOH, older operating systems do not run the latest and greatest software or support for the latest hardware.

What to do? Decide whether you are a "bleeding edge" type up for all the latest and don't mind some hassle to get it or if you are more interested in a hassle-free life and happy to wait a while before using the latest stuff. Most of us compromise, somewhere between the two extremes, in a "sweet spot" that suits us.
 
Old 09-04-2009, 03:29 PM   #6
teebones
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catkin View Post
Ubuntu (non-LTS versions) can go in that list, too.
thanks for pointing that out, i've added it.
 
  


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