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MajikTim 10-15-2019 10:44 AM

Looking for a simplified Linux "overview" resource
 
Is there a simplified overview of Linux (I am using Mint) to help understand different desktops, how the system works..... what packages are, how to properly do updates, etc etc

There are many website articles that talk about directory structure, which is important to understand, but that is not exactly what I am looking for.

Thank you in advance.

beachboy2 10-15-2019 11:06 AM

MajikTim,

The 3 Mint desktop environments:
https://linuxmint-installation-guide...st/choose.html

Menu > Package Manager > Installed (lists all the currently installed packages).

Menu > Software Manager > Use Search function or browse various categories.

Software updates via MintUpdate shield icon in bottom toolbar.
A green tick is shown if software is up to date. A white i on a blue background means updates are available.

Scroll down to Package Management & Updates for Linux Mint 19 Tara:
https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/...mint-tara.html

rtmistler 10-15-2019 11:51 AM

I'm struggling to understand exactly what it is you're looking for.

Linux is an operating system, which you likely know, and do not need to hear. But a general overview is very much the type of thing which you can obtain with various surfing the web. You have, but also it seems as if you've seen much of the same details, which I do feel are limited. If I go to wikipedia and search for Linux, it shows a great deal more than just the directory structure, it shows history, talks about different popular distributions, provides follow-up links. Sorry, but I feel you've limited yourself here, or you've perhaps summarized what you didn't find that you wished to see in a more clear manner. Also, look at the table of contents just for the wiki and determine if it covers any things you are seeking, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux

One can also search the web using combined terms, like "linux command line distros", "popular linux desktop environments", "desktop environment linux" and get a ton of hits where you can view what you wish, conclude if one or more of them do not give you what you're seeking, but also obtain follow-up links from various resources which describe in more detail specifics about a particular distro or DE.

Same for Linux packages, and package management. Upgrading depends on the distro and the package manager it uses.

If you have something more specific, people can be more specific.

I'd also suggest you check the sticky threads for the Software forum as well as the Newbie forum, and the Linux-General forum. All of these forums contain stick threads which cover many general Linux related topics, from distributions selections, to package manager overview, and other related topics you've asked about.

frankbell 10-15-2019 07:38 PM

It doesn't really address desktop environments, but I found Garrels's Introduction to Linux invaluable when I was a newbie. I still have my printed-out copy on my bookshelf.

It hasn't been updated in a while, but the stuff it talks about really hasn't changed much.

syg00 10-15-2019 07:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rtmistler (Post 6047110)
Linux is an operating system, which you likely know, and do not need to hear.

a good way to rile the GNU folks ... ;)

MajikTim 10-15-2019 08:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by frankbell (Post 6047231)
It doesn't really address desktop environments, but I found Garrel's Introduction to Linux invaluable when I was a newbie. I still have my printed-out copy on my bookshelf.

It hasn't been updated in a while, but the stuff it talks about really hasn't changed much.

I will look through this......Thank you!

Tim

MajikTim 10-15-2019 09:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beachboy2 (Post 6047103)
MajikTim,

The 3 Mint desktop environments:
https://linuxmint-installation-guide...st/choose.html

Menu > Package Manager > Installed (lists all the currently installed packages).

Menu > Software Manager > Use Search function or browse various categories.

Software updates via MintUpdate shield icon in bottom toolbar.
A green tick is shown if software is up to date. A white i on a blue background means updates are available.

Scroll down to Package Management & Updates for Linux Mint 19 Tara:
https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/...mint-tara.html

Thank you beachboy2

MajikTim 10-15-2019 09:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rtmistler (Post 6047110)
I'm struggling to understand exactly what it is you're looking for.

Linux is an operating system, which you likely know, and do not need to hear. But a general overview is very much the type of thing which you can obtain with various surfing the web. You have, but also it seems as if you've seen much of the same details, which I do feel are limited. If I go to wikipedia and search for Linux, it shows a great deal more than just the directory structure, it shows history, talks about different popular distributions, provides follow-up links. Sorry, but I feel you've limited yourself here, or you've perhaps summarized what you didn't find that you wished to see in a more clear manner. Also, look at the table of contents just for the wiki and determine if it covers any things you are seeking, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux

One can also search the web using combined terms, like "linux command line distros", "popular linux desktop environments", "desktop environment linux" and get a ton of hits where you can view what you wish, conclude if one or more of them do not give you what you're seeking, but also obtain follow-up links from various resources which describe in more detail specifics about a particular distro or DE.

Same for Linux packages, and package management. Upgrading depends on the distro and the package manager it uses.

If you have something more specific, people can be more specific.

I'd also suggest you check the sticky threads for the Software forum as well as the Newbie forum, and the Linux-General forum. All of these forums contain stick threads which cover many general Linux related topics, from distributions selections, to package manager overview, and other related topics you've asked about.

Thank you for the Wikipedia link; I failed to think about that. It looks like it may answer some of my questions. I did read some of the sticky threads, especially in the Newbie section, however I didn't look at the Software Forum.

I researched and made a decision to go with Linux Mint 19.2 "Tina" - MATE (64-bit). I first installed Cinnamon, but after some graphics trouble and then lost the use of the keyboard, I learned about the different desktops and installed MATE. It all seems to be running smoothly at this point.

I am sorry for not explaining myself better and I am still not sure how to do that. I just have a lot that I am trying to learn, thus an overall understanding, coming from Windows10. I think the wiki page will help. Thank you for your time and the info you provided.

hazel 10-16-2019 05:38 AM

Get a book called "Running Linux". I forget who wrote it but it was published by O'Reilly a long time ago and I think it's still the best introduction.

zeebra 10-16-2019 08:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MajikTim (Post 6047091)
Is there a simplified overview of Linux (I am using Mint) to help understand different desktops, how the system works..... what packages are, how to properly do updates, etc etc

There are many website articles that talk about directory structure, which is important to understand, but that is not exactly what I am looking for.

Thank you in advance.

GNU/Linux is not one thing to understand, it is a range of things to understand, which is basically the first thing you must understand. But aside from that a thing like FileSystemHiarchy is a good thing to read and is one of those parts. It is reasonably short on it's own and not too difficult to understand. I don't know a "version for dummy", and the "normal" ones also contains alot of info you don't really need. But there should be FSH documents around.

Other things is to read up on LSB, Linux standard base. Other things again to read up on is coreutils and bash.

Those 5 things are pretty fundamental to understanding GNU/Linux and some of the most important parts. Again, I don't know the dummy versions, and I've not read all the "Normal" versions myself, but come to learn what they are and how they work anyways.

What is GNU/Linux?
FSH
LSB
Coreutils
Bash

Additonal to those are tons of more inidvidual parts that make up the core, but I think understanding those are quite fundamental. Perhaps also read up the "normal" documentation on what Getty is, and Grub perhaps, those can also be important to understand more core principles.

Not sure it is useful for you to read about what the Linux Kernel is and how it works without first also reading up on computer basics, machine code, C and binary etc. But understanding how all those things go together could also be useful. Most useful is probably to understand what C is and how it works (compared to "alternatives").

I've read most of the things I've mentioned. And I found that I never truly understood what Bash is before I understood what getty is and how it works. Getty was fascinating reading, and so was FSH. Bash is more hands on, and I've personally never read about Coreutils, but learned over the years what it is and how it works. Meanwhile and after I already understood what the Linux Kernel is and how it works, and what GCC is and how that works and the whole core of GNU. My reading of GRub was also more hands on, alike to what Bash was, but I guess just understanding what Bash/getty/terminal is could be useful as well.

zeebra 10-16-2019 08:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MajikTim (Post 6047252)
I am sorry for not explaining myself better and I am still not sure how to do that. I just have a lot that I am trying to learn, thus an overall understanding, coming from Windows10. I think the wiki page will help. Thank you for your time and the info you provided.

I think it could be useful for you to try to figure out exactly what Mint is. What it consist of, and what makes up the parts to make it run like it is currently. One way to do that is to start Mint in "rescue mode" first and have a look, and then start it in multi-user non-graphical mode after. Runlevel 2 and 3.

Code:

systemd.unit=multi-user.target
Append that to your boot line in Grub to run runlevel3 or =rescue.target for runlevel 2.

beachboy2 10-16-2019 09:06 AM

MajikTim,

In addition to searching for a specific topic on the LQ forums, you may find this Easy Linux Tips for Mint & Ubuntu of interest:
https://easylinuxtipsproject.blogspot.com/p/1.html

MajikTim 10-16-2019 01:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hazel (Post 6047333)
Get a book called "Running Linux". I forget who wrote it but it was published by O'Reilly a long time ago and I think it's still the best introduction.

Thank you Hazel!

MajikTim 10-16-2019 01:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zeebra (Post 6047373)
I think it could be useful for you to try to figure out exactly what Mint is. What it consist of, and what makes up the parts to make it run like it is currently. One way to do that is to start Mint in "rescue mode" first and have a look, and then start it in multi-user non-graphical mode after. Runlevel 2 and 3.

Code:

systemd.unit=multi-user.target
Append that to your boot line in Grub to run runlevel3 or =rescue.target for runlevel 2.

Thank you Zeebra for ALL the info. I have some work to do. ;-)

MajikTim 10-16-2019 01:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beachboy2 (Post 6047382)
MajikTim,

In addition to searching for a specific topic on the LQ forums, you may find this Easy Linux Tips for Mint & Ubuntu of interest:
https://easylinuxtipsproject.blogspot.com/p/1.html

Thanks again beachboy2.

Captain Brillo 10-16-2019 04:57 PM

"How Linux Works" by Brian Ward, no starch press, 2nd edition 2015 (Cdn $ 40)

An easy read packed full of simple-to-use stuff.

zeebra 10-16-2019 05:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Captain Brillo (Post 6047573)
"How Linux Works" by Brian Ward, no starch press, 2nd edition 2015 (Cdn $ 40)

An easy read packed full of simple-to-use stuff.

To be honest, I think it's possible to sum up the most important of what GNU/Linux is and how it works in about 2-3 pages.

Probably someone on this forum could do it. It would be way better than a book, just to understand in brief what everyone who have used this system for a long time already knows about it.

beachboy2 10-17-2019 03:14 AM

MajikTim,

Quote:

There are many website articles that talk about directory structure, which is important to understand, but that is not exactly what I am looking for.
I appreciate what you are asking for, but such basic, general Linux guides are thin on the ground.

Here is Linux Made Simple from 2015:
https://ia801902.us.archive.org/22/i...le_2015_UK.pdf

You have successfully installed Linux Mint MATE, so just use your browser, word processor etc and carry out regular tasks as you previously did in Windows.

If you have a particular question, search these forums or start a new thread.

Enjoy your Linux Mint MATE.


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