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Old 11-30-2009, 07:35 PM   #1
vidix
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Smile Looking for a Linux Distro for learn (not ubuntu).... advices please


Hi.

I want to start learn Linux for using in my job.

My goal is to know enough Linux for install/deploy for apache,java, oracle, and keep running. Like when you install and configure a Windows Server for working with asp.net, sql, etc...

For now I don't want to be a guru, but I want to have a good-wide understanding about linux.

Because I don't have any friend for share knowledge and because I like to read Docs, i'm looking for a Linux Distro (just for server) with a lot of Official Documentation.

I've used to read MSDN from microsoft, so I am looking something like this but for LINUX.

I that about Slackware, Red Hat, Solaris, Fedora, Debian, Suse. But I don't know anyone ( debian a little).
I'm looking for a linux distro for compile, learn, test, configure (server side) so I need a good DOCS with the distro.

Maybe I'm not being objective now, because I do not have enough experience in linux and I'm saying maybe stupid things.
I'm disoriented.

I'm tired of read docs from the web, and when I want to test it, doesn't work exaclty with the current distro I'm using, that's why I want a distro with enough official docs, and be able to use it with Oracle and Java.

If you are working in a linux environment, I would like to know, what you using for support Oracle and those things.

Because I'm sutudying java and if One day some one ask me to set up a linux server, I have to know how to do it.

well... I hope make friend here.

bye for now.
thanks.
 
Old 11-30-2009, 07:52 PM   #2
itsbrad212
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i suggest fedora:

http://fedoraproject.org
 
Old 11-30-2009, 08:00 PM   #3
~sHyLoCk~
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Pick one and use it, learn it.
 
Old 11-30-2009, 08:08 PM   #4
sycamorex
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I'd suggest you use CentOS (a free, recompiled RHEL stripped of RedHat logos). It's very popular on servers.
http://www.centos.org/
However, as it was suggested above - try a few of them and use the one you like most.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 11-30-2009, 08:43 PM   #5
bret381
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ~sHyLoCk~ View Post
Pick one and use it, learn it.
I have to agree. All distros are different, but ultimately the same under the hood. To learn one distro, you will know THAT distro. If you are looking to learn a distro for use with servers, In my opinion CentOS is a good option. However SuSe Linux Enterprise Server is a good distro as well. For Desktops I prefer Slack, Suse, Fedora or Ubuntu. That's just me. You can do pretty much the same stuff on every distro that you are talking about. So as stated by Shylock. pick one and use it, and learn it.
 
Old 11-30-2009, 08:51 PM   #6
chrism01
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If you do go with Centos, this is useful: http://www.linuxtopia.org/online_boo...ion/index.html
 
Old 11-30-2009, 09:07 PM   #7
vidix
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Thank you all !!...

Yes, because I am windows user, and used to have Docs for everything, I would like a distro with a lot of docs, for learn.

Is a huge step for me, leave windows and get into Linux. Maybe I also have to get a Linux Desktop, my curve of learning will be fast. What about Slackware? I will be able to install, Eclipse? oracle, java on slackware? or Fedora?

I need some advices, then I will find the path by myself.

My goal is to be a java and oracle developer, and is a must for me to know Linux. so I'm going to start with it first, and then develop under Linux.

I don't know why I get some stressful when I try to find the why how to get the same things in Linux, maybe is because im accustomed to windows and its easy of use, I don't know.

thank for help me and your advices.

Last edited by vidix; 11-30-2009 at 09:09 PM.
 
Old 11-30-2009, 09:15 PM   #8
craigevil
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If you want lots of Docs, then Ubuntu Server, CentOS, or SuSe Linux Enterprise Server would all be good choices.
 
Old 11-30-2009, 09:19 PM   #9
evo2
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Since you want official documentation and a more server oriented system you may be best going for an "Enterprise"* commercial distribution or a free clone of it. For this reason I suspect you may be happiest with CentOS (although I'd never choose it for myself).

Quote:
I don't know why I get some stressful when I try to find the why how to get the same things in Linux, maybe is because im accustomed to windows and its easy of use, I don't know.
It is most probably simply because windows is the system you're most familiar with. Not because it is intrinsically any easier to use.

Cheers,

Evo2.

* "Enterprise"... what a stupid term.
 
Old 11-30-2009, 09:25 PM   #10
bret381
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http://www.amazon.com/Fedora-Red-Ent...9633721&sr=8-3

You may look for books in addition to docs on the web. Web docs are great, but sometimes a good book is very helpful. This particular book is for Fedora, but most distros have a similar book. You may do a quick search on Amazon for the distro you want. Be aware of the publish date. If you are running the newest version of a particular distro, you don't really want a book on that same distro published in 1997.

Slackware is a great distro. I run slackware 64 and love it. You don't really get any fancy gui admin tools like you would with say SuSe or Red Hat/CentOS, but definately a great linux to learn. Also, you will get your share of compiling software, as there are not any repositories to download software from (other than the slackbuilds)

My only advise in replacing a windows desktop with a linux one is this: I wouldn't replace your windows desktop with a distro such as Slackware at first. Linux is not the same as windows and can be overwhelming for some. There are not any familiar software packages short of a few web browsers that you will recognize. Something such as Ubuntu may not teach you everything you want to learn about linux, it is a good place to start. Something like PcLinuxOS is also a good place to start. This way you will stick with it. I try to get people on Linux all the time. They say yeah, looks good I'll give it a try. I get it installed and a week or two later, they're ready to go back to windows. So in MY opinion, keep it simple at first when it comes to replacing your desktop
 
Old 11-30-2009, 09:28 PM   #11
linus72
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no doubt
go with a hand holder like Ubuntu
EDIT: sorry, not Ubuntu...
errr...go with one that has alot of pkg's
n'less your the adventurous type...

Linux's syntax and "slang"
at first really threw me

Quote:
sudo su
LOL?!
WTF is that?
egyptian or what?

startx
?
it doesn't start itself?

wtf is a terminal?!
LOL

Last edited by linus72; 11-30-2009 at 09:29 PM.
 
Old 11-30-2009, 09:38 PM   #12
AwesomeMachine
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Linux officially uses the FSH (File System Hierarchy). Fedora and Debian adhere tightly to the FSH. Ubuntu is Debian. SuSE does not adhere to the official FSH, but it's gotten closer as of late. Fedora is a hardware pig. It consume resources like a hog. But it's very good. Debian is cryptic, but there is more documentation written for Debian specific Linux than any other distro. Debian has available for installation approximately 16 GB of documentation. The web contains incomparably more than that.

I have had a few problems with Fedora 11 that I could not solve. These were minor. I have never had a problem with Debian that I could not solve. Slackware is also hard core Linux. It adheres to rigid Linux standards, even more rigid than Fedora or Debian. Slackware is also an original Linux distro, from the very beginning. It might have been the very first official Linux distro.

I learned on SuSE. But I had to learn everything again, because SuSE is NOT standard Linux. After I learned Debian and Fedora, I could use any distro. There is nothing like The MSDN Library for Linux. For Linux there is google.com. Google is considerably more complete than The MSDN Library, but not quite as well organized.

I'll give you a hint: Most Linux documentation is in /usr/share/doc. Just write that down. And fair warning: If you tough it out, and actually learn Linux, you won't want to work on Windows any longer.
 
Old 11-30-2009, 09:40 PM   #13
linus72
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I would say I also prefer distros that have long release cycles
Fedora irks me, as soon as I get comfortable with 10/11
its gonna be obsolete...sucks
 
Old 11-30-2009, 09:52 PM   #14
vidix
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Thanks.

My idea about LInux on the server or "enterprise" was because I met a guy, good guy who help me how to program in .NET.

but I want to develop in JAva + Linux. So I see a lot of jobs ads, linux,linux,unix, etc... So I have to learn it.

So debian has 16 gb? I think is everything I would need and more, where I can find it? and CentOs seems a good option too.
I saw that CentOs share the Red Hat documentation, and I there is a lot of documentation.

I've tested, in the past, debian, kubuntu, ubuntu, fedora(hog really), solaris, but always I fall down again in WindowsXP tramp and its Visual Studio.

I want to leave it, use Linux with Eclipse, and set it up correctly.

How can I get into LInux and be a productive developer, that are my worries. what are those LInux distros that they ask you for apply to a job??.

Is there someone a software developer and LInux user ??
 
Old 11-30-2009, 09:59 PM   #15
linus72
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Commercially and for your job I would say
your gonna run into Redhat/SUSE
so, fedora and centos are redhat based
and you can get opensuse
so..
maybe theres others too they use in business?
 
  


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