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Old 01-05-2006, 02:52 PM   #1
Penguin of Wonder
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List of Bash Commands


I found this website while looking for how to find a file in the terminal. It lists all the bash commnads in Linux. Alright I don't know if it lists ALL of them, but its definatly all of the revelvent ones. Maybe we should put this website in a sticky somewhere for people looking for bash commands.

List of Bash Commands

If this has already been posted or stickied, sorry, I didn't see it anywhere.
 
Old 01-05-2006, 03:27 PM   #2
Tinkster
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And boy, what an inappropriate title for that list. Only
very few of those commands have got anything to do with
bash, most of them are stand-alone executables that can
be run from ANY old shell :}


Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 01-05-2006, 03:34 PM   #3
muha
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thanks for the links! I put them in my 'Linux Bookmarks' where, it turned out, A-Z Bash Commands was already present. Oh well ...
 
Old 01-05-2006, 03:47 PM   #4
assacin
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OH BOY!! really a very good link. Thanks... :-)
 
Old 01-05-2006, 06:29 PM   #5
Penguin of Wonder
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinkster
And boy, what an inappropriate title for that list
Sorry about the title, i'm still a newbie myself and I honestly don't know the difference between a "bash" and a "shell." Either way though, I didn't make the site, I just found it and suggested it. I'm glad to see its atleast helped two people .
 
Old 01-05-2006, 06:51 PM   #6
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Wow i like that!! thanks for the link bratha, What is the diffeerence between BASH and SHell anyways? when u open them they both lok the same to me!
 
Old 01-05-2006, 06:59 PM   #7
bosewicht
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr_coffee
Wow i like that!! thanks for the link bratha, What is the diffeerence between BASH and SHell anyways? when u open them they both lok the same to me!
The Bourne shell, or sh, was the default Unix shell of Unix Version 7, and replaced the Thompson shell, whose executable file had the same name, sh. It was developed by Stephen Bourne, of AT&T Bell Laboratories, and was released in 1977 in the Version 7 UNIX release distributed to colleges and universities. It remains a popular default shell for Unix accounts. The binary program of the Bourne shell or a compatible program is located at /bin/sh on most Unix systems.


Bash, also known as the Bourne-Again shell, was later developed for the GNU project and takes features from the Bourne shell, csh and ksh.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bourne_shell
 
Old 01-05-2006, 10:11 PM   #8
pixellany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinkster
And boy, what an inappropriate title for that list. Only
very few of those commands have got anything to do with
bash, most of them are stand-alone executables that can
be run from ANY old shell :}
Cheers,
Tink
Technically correct--however, from the view point of the user of bash, the difference is moot--ie if you are in a particular shell you have a set of commands available to you.
Check, for example, how many things on the referenced list are discussed in "Bash Guide for Beginners" by Machtelt Garrels (on TLDP).
 
Old 01-05-2006, 11:29 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany
Technically correct--however, from the view point of the user of bash, the difference is moot--ie if you are in a particular shell you have a set of commands available to you.
Check, for example, how many things on the referenced list are discussed in "Bash Guide for Beginners" by Machtelt Garrels (on TLDP).
And what do you want me to say? :)

That common wrong usage of a term makes it right?

Surely not. That aside you haven't read her quite correctly,
it IS a guide to bash, the fact that she uses "well known
Linux/Unix commands" (a sound knowledge of which she
happens to set as a pre-requisite for her guide) to demon-
strate how the bash works doesn't mean that she believes
that those are "bash commands".

As far as the "availability" of commands in a shell goes,
it clearly depends on a number of factors:
a) which shell you're using
b) whether the command you're trying to use is a shell-builtin
of that shell or not
c) whether the command you're trying to use happens to be
in your path
d) whether you have permissions to run that command in case
you happen to know the full path to it




Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 01-06-2006, 01:38 AM   #10
pixellany
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As you have explained it, I believe you are correct.
 
Old 01-06-2006, 02:00 AM   #11
fancypiper
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Directory of Linux Bash Commands
 
Old 01-06-2006, 02:23 AM   #12
pixellany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fancypiper
I think I hear a faint voice in the distance: "These are **Linux** commands, some of which may also be **bash** commands." As I pointed out earlier, you may not care....

When I write a script to run under the bash shell, I might choose to define "bash command" as any command that is callable from my bash script. YMMV

How many votes for ending this thread?
 
Old 01-06-2006, 02:51 AM   #13
fancypiper
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I noticed the first list was pretty light in the commands, so I posted a link to a little larger one.

BTW, You can roll your own bash commands with alias in your .bashrc file.

Code:
# Fedora Core 4 .bashrc file for user piper box uilleann
# User specific aliases and functions

# Start X server
alias x='startx'

# Change bash prompt. See the article
# http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-tip-prompt/
export PS1='\d \@ \[\e[32;1m\]\u\[\e[34;1m\]@\[\e[36;1m\]\H \[\e[34;1m\]\w\[\e[32;1m\] $ \[\e[0m\]'

# Keep 1000 lines in .bash_history (default is 500)
export HISTSIZE=1000
export HISTFILESIZE=1000

#Stop bash from caching duplicate lines.
HISTCONTROL=ignoredups

# Disk free
alias df='df -h'

# Set paths
alias path='echo -e ${PATH//:/\\n}'

# Allow local users to use my X session
# xhost +local:

# I can't remember the new gnome command!
alias gtop='/usr/bin/gnome-system-monitor'

# Alter the ls command
alias ls='ls -ac'
alias lls='ls -lac'

# Set background in Fluxbox
# alias bg='fbsetbg -c /home/piper/Pictures/kells/kelljesusarrest.gif'
# alias bg='fbsetbg -c /home/piper/Pictures/kells/KellsFol114rArrestOfChrist.jpg'
alias bg='fbsetbg -c /home/piper/Pictures/kells/KellsFol007vMadonnaChild.jpg'

# Become system administrator
alias god='su -'

# Because less is more and more is less
alias more='less'

# xterm
# alias xterm='xterm -bg black -fg white'

# Launch links with my linux links page
alias links='elinks /home/piper/bookmarks.html'

# For nano editor because I forget which one I use in which distro
alias pico='nano -w'
alias nano='nano -w'

# Start gkrellm after stopping it in x
alias monitor='gkrellm -w &'

# Script needs to be on the bottom of the file or RH updates will fsck it up
# Source global definitions
if [ -f /etc/bashrc ]; then
	. /etc/bashrc
fi

Last edited by fancypiper; 01-06-2006 at 03:02 AM.
 
Old 01-06-2006, 11:09 AM   #14
Penguin of Wonder
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by fancypiper
I will admit your site is a bit sexier than mine. Good job.
 
  


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