LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 02-22-2010, 03:31 AM   #1
johnkelly.110
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2010
Location: Liverpool, UK
Posts: 46

Rep: Reputation: 0
Linux Virgin?


I have started to use Open Office and GIMP and am HUGELY impressed! I currently use Vista as my OS but I am seriously thinking of using Linux as my OS!
I have been able to transfer most of my files to be editable through Open Office and will start using GIMP a lot more.
I need an alternative to MS Money and then I will seriously think about changing to Linux.
Is there anywhere with a list of Linux Compatible programs and will all my hardware (some old some new, run on Linux (as they do on Vista) - will all my drivers need replacing?
And any further tips you think would help the "changeover"?
 
Old 02-22-2010, 03:44 AM   #2
win32sux
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Los Angeles
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 9,870

Rep: Reputation: 377Reputation: 377Reputation: 377Reputation: 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnkelly.110 View Post
I have started to use Open Office and GIMP and am HUGELY impressed! I currently use Vista as my OS but I am seriously thinking of using Linux as my OS!
I have been able to transfer most of my files to be editable through Open Office and will start using GIMP a lot more.
I need an alternative to MS Money and then I will seriously think about changing to Linux.
Is there anywhere with a list of Linux Compatible programs and will all my hardware (some old some new, run on Linux (as they do on Vista) - will all my drivers need replacing?
And any further tips you think would help the "changeover"?
Welcome to LQ! We hope you like it here!

We've got a software equivalence list on our wiki. As for the hardware, your best bet might be to boot a live CD to see how well your hardware is supported by Linux - you won't need to make any modifications to the data on your hard drive. I'd recommend Ubuntu (the installation disk doubles as a live CD), but only because I've had good experiences with it. You've got plenty of choices, as should be evident if you check out the Wikipedia link I've given you.

Last edited by win32sux; 02-22-2010 at 03:46 AM.
 
Old 02-22-2010, 11:53 AM   #3
brucehinrichs
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Location: US
Distribution: Debian Sid; Sabayon, UbuntuStudio, Slackware-multilib 13.1, Peppermint Ice, CentOS
Posts: 575

Rep: Reputation: 67
Welcome to LinuxQuestions and the community in general! I have been helping a few people get used to linux, and from my experience Linux Mint (http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php) is the easiest to transition to from Winblows. It is based on Ubuntu (also an excellent choice to get your feet wet), but includes some of the prorietary codecs and drivers that winblows users are so used to (and may have need for with their currently saved media, etc.). Plus there is an excellent tutorial (http://www.howtoforge.com/the-perfec...-mint-8-helena) that takes one through the process of making your box a winblows replacement. This tutorial is available for other distros as well, just google 'the perfect desktop <distroname>'.
 
Old 02-22-2010, 01:56 PM   #4
johnkelly.110
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2010
Location: Liverpool, UK
Posts: 46

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Smile Thank You!

Quote:
Originally Posted by win32sux View Post
Welcome to LQ! We hope you like it here!

We've got a software equivalence list on our wiki. As for the hardware, your best bet might be to boot a live CD to see how well your hardware is supported by Linux - you won't need to make any modifications to the data on your hard drive. I'd recommend Ubuntu (the installation disk doubles as a live CD), but only because I've had good experiences with it. You've got plenty of choices, as should be evident if you check out the Wikipedia link I've given you.
Thank You - Very helpful - I'm sure I'll be back with more questions - Thanks!
 
Old 02-22-2010, 02:10 PM   #5
catkin
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Tamil Nadu, India
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 8,576
Blog Entries: 31

Rep: Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195Reputation: 1195
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnkelly.110 View Post
And any further tips you think would help the "changeover"?
Find more applications that run on both Linux and Vista and start using them on Vista. That way you will have less to learn after the changeover. For all the programs you use, check the equivalence list given above. Here are some more equivalence links:
Useful orientation: Linux is not Windows.
 
Old 02-22-2010, 03:15 PM   #6
David Bleil
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2005
Location: Annapolsi, MD
Distribution: Open SuSE 11.1
Posts: 4

Rep: Reputation: 0
My recommendation for your request for a Linux version of Microsoft money is Gnu Cash. I have been using it now for three years to manage my own finances and those of a small non profit organization plus two Financial Trusts. I find it very flexible and quick to use. You will need to make some mental adoptions to the Gnu Cash terminology such as accounts used in stead of categories. It imports financial files in a few formats including csv so you should be able to avoid having to re-enter existing data. Gnu Cash is capable of some on line banking functions but I have not used these so I can not comment on them. The distribution I use Open Suse includes Gnu Cash but it is downloadable for the distribution yo select.
 
Old 02-22-2010, 03:43 PM   #7
fgw
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Distribution: Ubuntu, CentOS, FreeNAS
Posts: 26

Rep: Reputation: 15
I used Microsoft Money since the mid 90's through to Money 2005. Just this last year (2009) I started using gnucash and have been able to adjust quite well.

In comparison, MS Money is more like a checkbook register and gnucash is more like Quicken/Quickbooks, leaning towards a full fledged accounting package.

The reporting is done a little differently. In MS Money you would go to a report, then build your criteria (query) and then produce the report. In gnucash, you go do the query first and produce the report off of the query. Once you get used to that it works fantastic.

After more than a decade of using MS Money changing software was a bit of a scary notion but after 6 months with gnucash I am comfortable I didn't lose any information.

Note: I went into MS Money and shut off all automatic transactions so that I could have a static cut off point with MS Money. As I moved all the information over to gnucash, I was able to ensure all my balances were accurate to that point in time.

Good luck
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Linux Virgin PrettyLilRed LinuxQuestions.org Member Intro 1 12-09-2009 02:57 PM
linux virgin jpksmurf Linux - Newbie 2 01-07-2009 04:00 PM
Linux Virgin daddymann LinuxQuestions.org Member Intro 4 02-24-2007 02:29 PM
Yet another Linux virgin. Karizma LinuxQuestions.org Member Intro 2 12-08-2006 12:58 PM
Linux Virgin walsht3108 Linux - Newbie 5 08-25-2003 11:21 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:06 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration