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Old 06-14-2008, 05:27 AM   #1
diwakars
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linux understand different file systems


How can linux understand these many different file systems??
What is the logic/ reason behind it?
 
Old 06-14-2008, 07:36 AM   #2
TITiAN
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some people might need an older file system to get/change files from an old/another filesystem on another system. If you want to just install Linux and don't have to do with other systems, of course you only need one filesystem (typically ext3). Today's Windows only uses NTFS, as far as I know, but FAT, which was used before, can still be used.
I say Linux is just flexible with e.g. file systems.
Is that what you wanted to know?
 
Old 06-14-2008, 08:35 AM   #3
austinium
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google "Linux Virtual File System". it'll come up with the explanation you are looking for.
try this if u r in a hurry

Last edited by austinium; 06-14-2008 at 08:42 AM. Reason: typo from a messed up keyboard
 
Old 06-14-2008, 09:22 AM   #4
pixellany
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I suppose it is related to why there are so many choices of window managers, text editors, and other applications.
Freedom and Choice
 
Old 06-14-2008, 01:20 PM   #5
diwakars
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No Titan and pixellany that is not my question.
Its NoT abt WHY but its abt HOW??
Its not related to CHOICE of file system.

There should be some logic on how it is reading/differentiating different types file system on same disk/OS.
 
Old 06-14-2008, 01:26 PM   #6
Nylex
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There are drivers in the kernel that are used to read different filesystems..
 
Old 06-14-2008, 01:38 PM   #7
H_TeXMeX_H
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Ever worked with a Mac ? I did for a while, it was a real pain because both Window$ and Mac refuse to be inter-compatible with one another. So you really had no way of transferring any kind of files between them using a floppy (this was about 10 years ago or so, when floppies were more prevalent, and it was in a place where floppies were more prevalent: an ancient computer science lab in El Paso). However, using Linux, and with the right filesystem modules built-in FAT, HFS support (I think they used HFS on Mac floppies, right ?) you can use both. Not to mention other filesystems that neither Mac or Window$ support or will ever support. Clearly, Linux is superior
 
Old 06-14-2008, 01:43 PM   #8
diwakars
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Thanx Nylex........ It did not clear my doubt either.

Thanks It Austinium helped me to some extent.
 
Old 06-14-2008, 01:44 PM   #9
Nylex
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What exactly do you want to know?
 
Old 06-14-2008, 03:00 PM   #10
jtshaw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diwakars View Post
Thanx Nylex........ It did not clear my doubt either.

Thanks It Austinium helped me to some extent.

The "how" is all in the VFS layer of the Linux kernel. The Linux kernel file system code is object oriented so that in order to create support for another file system one just needs to write a module of code that defines the appropriate commands (such as open, close, read, write, and seek) for the particular FS and Linux and all it's various tools can use it. In fact, it is so simple to do you can write a basic file system in a couple of hours...
 
  


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