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Old 12-07-2018, 11:34 AM   #1
legtdl
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Linux terminal info / course


Hey!
As I wrote in my presentation, I'm new to the Linux world.
I'm looking for information or any free course or equivalent about commands used in the terminal.
Because the terminal is a powerful tool, I think it seems wise to start here.

All tips are welcomed.

Sincerely
Michael
 
Old 12-07-2018, 11:47 AM   #2
jsbjsb001
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Quote:
Originally Posted by legtdl View Post
Hey!
As I wrote in my presentation, I'm new to the Linux world.
I'm looking for information or any free course or equivalent about commands used in the terminal.
Because the terminal is a powerful tool, I think it seems wise to start here.
...
New to Linux and jumping straight into the terminal? Well someone's keen, ain't they now?

A simple Google search should bring up many guides for using the terminal, one link you can look at, is the one at the very top of this forum, being this one.

Just make sure when running commands, you have some idea of what it's likely to do first, or use a Virtual Machine - probably better to practice there first. But yes, it is very powerful.
 
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Old 12-07-2018, 11:55 AM   #3
zeebra
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Hi there,

terminal is a bit misrepresenting to be honest. It's a terminal emulator which emulates the functions found in the non graphical terminal interface (tty). But, it pretty much works the same way.

What is the terminal? Well, simply said, the terminal is "GNU bash". So, what you really want to do is to learn bash. Well, anyways, it is not entirely true that is is "bash", because you can also use choose another "shell" than bash. Example ash, dash, korn etc etc.
https://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/
http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Bash-Prog-Intro-HOWTO.html

So, what is bash/shell/terminal? What does it do?
$PATH contains a bunch of programs and functions from GNU, the operating system that you use, and alot more programs and functions from various places. And this is what bash can do. It can use those in various clever ways, not only as an executable. So, to know all the things you can do, you need to understand what each program you have can do. The limits of bash/terminal is what software you have installed. So if you want to learn about what you can do with Bash, you need to try to learn what you can do with GNU software packages and tools etc.. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNU

So, "terminal" is basically to simplify it "bash". So what you want to do is learn bash.. Bash it not difficult to use in and of itself. You just have to familiarize yourself with bash, but also the core utilities you have IN bash:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...ities_commands

Maybe this scares you, but it shouldn't. It should encourage you. It is not difficult, I'm just explaining it in a difficult way.

I don't know about free courses, or paid ones for that sake. But learning bash by yourself is not really a difficult thing, and it is free. Besides, there are hundreds or thousands of manuals and tutorials on bash out there, and they can all help you in learning bash for free. So just search online for "bash howto", "bash manual" or "bash tutorial" and you will find alot of material that you can use to learn the "terminal emulator".

But the last link I provided, "GNU coreutils" list is definetely worth looking into as well. And here is the manual (which you will not need) for coreutils:
https://www.gnu.org/software/coreuti...coreutils.html

Just use the list instead.. (this one: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...ities_commands) And if you have any questions about the list or how those things work, don't use the coreutils manual. Just type in "info commandX" or "commandX --help" in your terminal. For example "info cp" or "cp --help".

Last edited by zeebra; 12-07-2018 at 12:01 PM.
 
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Old 12-07-2018, 12:04 PM   #4
legtdl
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Thank you "jsbjsb001" and "zeebra" for your replay!
/Michael
 
Old 12-07-2018, 12:11 PM   #5
zeebra
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Good luck!
 
Old 12-07-2018, 08:38 PM   #6
ObsoleteMan
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The Linux Training Academy and Udemy offer free and paid courses.


https://www.linuxtrainingacademy.com/

https://www.udemy.com/
 
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Old 12-07-2018, 09:29 PM   #7
frankbell
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A good free reference is the BASH Guide for Beginners. It hasn't been updated in a decade, but the subject it addresses hasn't changed significantly.
 
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Old 12-08-2018, 02:18 PM   #8
AwesomeMachine
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I would say
Code:
$ ls /bin
and then
Code:
$ man filename
for every file listed with the 'ls' command.
 
Old 12-08-2018, 02:38 PM   #9
zeebra
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Maybe I am old fashion for liking "info"..

regards,
man -k

Last edited by zeebra; 12-08-2018 at 02:43 PM.
 
Old 12-08-2018, 03:04 PM   #10
scasey
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It's not free, but the O'Reilly book "UNIX in a Nutshell" is an excellent source.
 
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Old 12-08-2018, 03:22 PM   #11
rokytnji
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I learned file structure 1st before playing with unknown commands in terminal.

Kinda nice to know the area of the place you are working in before changing it around.
 
Old 12-08-2018, 04:35 PM   #12
dc.901
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Agree with scasey about O'Reilly book "UNIX in a Nutshell"

Also recommend this one:
https://www.amazon.com/Shell-Program...ct_top?ie=UTF8

Learned a lot from both books (and from LQ ).
 
Old 12-08-2018, 06:15 PM   #13
ObsoleteMan
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"UNIX in a Nutshell" was published in 2005. While older books contain good information, there's more recent stuff out there as linux has grown since then.
 
Old 12-08-2018, 06:50 PM   #14
scasey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ObsoleteMan View Post
"UNIX in a Nutshell" was published in 2005. While older books contain good information, there's more recent stuff out there as linux has grown since then.
The 4th Edition is dated 2009...and I’d submit that most of what’s included hasn’t changed since then (or since day one, for that matter).
It wouldn't include anything about SystemD, I suppose.

I will concede that my copy is a 1992 edition..."The System V" edition, which is about when I started working with Unix.

Mostly what's good about any of the O'Rielly books is the way they're written works (for me) as both a tutorial/instruction and a reference manual.

Last edited by scasey; 12-08-2018 at 07:05 PM.
 
Old 12-08-2018, 09:14 PM   #15
ObsoleteMan
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O'Rielly's pretty good but I feel most of their stuff seems dated. I like to have more than one source. The sincher is they work for the reader. As long as there is something to be got out of them.

Mike
 
  


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