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Old 07-22-2004, 01:47 PM   #16
r3dhatter
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Where do I put my swap partition if I am just making 2 partitions:

/root 79 gb
swap 1 gb

Does the swap go before or after the root partition? Or does it not matter?

Thanks
 
Old 07-22-2004, 01:51 PM   #17
liquidtenmilion
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Generally it doesn't matter where the swap goes. I think it would be better to have it after because you generally don't use swap that often. Only when installing or downloading very large files.

Yeah you could use a seperate hd, infact, that is even better than a backup partition.

Debian Sid(unstable) is running pretty well actually. There are times when a program breaks when you update, but the next day there will usually be a fix for it. The only problem i had was upgrading mozilla 1.6 to 1.7. I was even able to successfully update Xfree without any packages breaking. I actually recommend Sid over Sarge because Sarge is still out of date a little bit. But your mileage may vary.

Last edited by liquidtenmilion; 07-22-2004 at 01:53 PM.
 
Old 07-22-2004, 02:05 PM   #18
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When you upgraded mozilla to 1.7 , were you still able to use kde? For me I will be doing programming, so I want the comp to be available and working correctly all the time. I wouldn't care if it were a regular desktop system though.
 
Old 07-22-2004, 02:42 PM   #19
r3dhatter
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And do you use ext3 or reiserfs for your root partition? Does the new sarge installer allow you to use reiserfs4 ?
 
Old 07-22-2004, 03:23 PM   #20
r3dhatter
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I did some research on ext3 and reiser. Is it still true that if the power goes out on reiser you will lose everything and on ext3 you won't? I have a new hd, so I don't think there would be much of a speed difference between reiser and ext3, or is there?
 
Old 07-22-2004, 04:29 PM   #21
liquidtenmilion
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Ok, when i upgraded mozilla, it broke functionality of Gnome, it left KDE fine. I am using reiserfs on all my partitions. Reiserfs is the fastest linux filesystem and has the most advanced journal. With ext3 and reiserfs, since they both have journals, if the power goes out you will not lose any data, and you don't need to check your drive for consistency after an improper shutdown. With ext2, you do risk losing data and you will have to check your drive.
 
Old 07-22-2004, 04:59 PM   #22
vectordrake
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I use a /boot as the documentation for Gentoo suggested it. I said :what the hell?" and did it. Currrently, my 32mb /boot partition, formatted as ext2 (no journal) has 3 kernels residing in it. The used space is 11mb (33%). I can fit about 5 more kernels in there before its full (not gonna - once the latest compile seems stable, I'll ditch the oldest). FYI.

You don't need a seperate /boot but its no biggie if you do.
 
Old 07-23-2004, 12:20 AM   #23
r_jensen11
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Quote:
Originally posted by vectordrake
If you want to read the linux partitions from windows, I have heard of a utility that can read the ext systems, but nothing seems to be able to read (or write, for sure) to reiserfs. Almost nobody cares about that, but you may want to consider that when you choose your filesystem.
rfstool lets you read reiserFS3.7, not sure about rfs4. The only downside I see for this is, like you said, you can't write to the linux partitions, and that whatever files you read from the linux partition have to be copied to a temporary folder on C: somewhere. This was a pain for me, because I had essentially no space on C:, preventing me from copying over any large files (Luckily, the large files I have aren't crucial, so copied the files I needed, although it took several cycles of clearing whatever files were cached in the temporary folder after I moved them over.)


Quote:
Originally posted by qwijibow
true.... but unless you have a HUGE hard disk, a seperate home partiton can be annoying.

what if you run out of space on your root partiton, but still have plenty on your home.
or what if your home directory gets full.

then you have to resize the partitons, which is very annoying.

for a first time install, i would recomend keeping it simple.
I currently have a 500MB /var partition and a 39GB / partition. I'm going to shrink the / down to about 7.5 or 10 if I can, and then I'm going to jerryrig my system to have my /usr/local on my /home partition. That is, if I ever get around to doing all of that....
 
Old 07-23-2004, 11:47 AM   #24
linmix
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Quote:
Originally posted by vectordrake
I use a /boot as the documentation for Gentoo suggested it. I said :what the hell?" and did it. Currrently, my 32mb /boot partition, formatted as ext2 (no journal) has 3 kernels residing in it. The used space is 11mb (33%). I can fit about 5 more kernels in there before its full (not gonna - once the latest compile seems stable, I'll ditch the oldest). FYI.

You don't need a seperate /boot but its no biggie if you do.
Do you use three distros or are you experimenting with kernels? How big is a standard 2.4 or 2.6 kernel?
 
Old 07-23-2004, 12:27 PM   #25
vectordrake
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Actually, both. I use three distros, as it says to the left (and if I had a bigger drive, I'd have many more on there.lol).

I have three kernels in /boot, actually. I haven't bothered setting up the other two to use that partition at all. Gentoo has become my main working OS. Everytime there is a new revision to the kernel sources available, I download it and compile a new kernel from those sources. Then I run with it and keep the last one as a backup. Until it performs as expected for a few days, though I leave the old "backup" there as well. So, I have 3 revisions of the same 2.6.7 kernel right now.

Here's a rundown of kernel sizes on my system:

mandrake 10's general 2.6.3 kernel - 1405k
slackware 10's general 2.4.26 kernel - 1221k
my gentoo 2.6.7 kernel - 1794k (I compiled in support that general kernels don't have)
 
Old 07-23-2004, 03:18 PM   #26
linmix
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Wow, I thought a kernel would be much, much bigger.

(there's people running doifferent distro's on different machines: work, home, etc. so I though I'd ask, and your answer is an eye opener)

... so you can use the same kernel (in a seperate /boot partition) to run on different distros... need to put my thinking cap on
 
Old 07-23-2004, 06:58 PM   #27
vectordrake
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Sort of. Here's my partition table:

40G Maxtor Diamondmax8
/dev/hda1 - winxp - ntfs - 3G, which is too small for that bloated moster
/dev/hda2 - /boot - ext2 - 32MB (plenty of room) - used by Gentoo only for now
/dev/hda3 - swap - 200MB, as Gentoo almost never uses more that the 256mb in my machine
/dev/hda4 - extended partition, according to fdisk (the rest of the disk - logical drives inside)
/dev/hda5 - / - 10G - Gentoo lives here (no sep /home, but I may make another part /home/corey/extra)
/dev/hda6 - / - for Slackware 10 - 4G (I manually mount this when I want, like....
/dev/hda8 - / - for Mandrake 10 - 4G (geometrically the next partition, but fdisk renimbered it)
/dev/hda7 - /mnt/share - the rest ~ 18G - FAT32 - where all my biggie stuff sits - clearing house accessible to all OSs

The /boot has the kernels for Gentoo, but the kernels for the others reside on their respective root partitions, in the /boot directory.

I'd actually like to have another drive like it (or both WD800JB) so I could fill it with BSDs and BeOS (and maybe HURD), but $$$...

So, to recap, I have Winxp, Mandy, Slack, and Gentoo on one hard drive, all booting from the same GRUB. My working OS is Gentoo (it uses the seperate /boot) and the rest are minions, plebes, servants, what have you. This setup works, so there's proof that a linux can be migrated to another drive intact (Gentoo was installed originally on another drive and I didn't want to take a weekend to start fresh) and that Windows can be installed successfully after the fact. If I can do it, so can you.

Last edited by vectordrake; 07-23-2004 at 07:00 PM.
 
Old 07-24-2004, 02:48 AM   #28
linmix
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Sounds good. My main drive is a bit of a mess at the moment and I may need to change some partitions. Could you guve me a basic rundown on how you migrated your linux os to a different drive? (I suppose it's a little more complicated than copy&paste and change fstab and grub to reflect the changes)
 
Old 07-24-2004, 07:46 AM   #29
vectordrake
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Not long ago, I participated in this thread which asked that question. There are a few ideas presented there. I think that mine's the right one, of course. Basically, I did it with 15 minutes of reading and 15 minutes of waiting for the files to transfer. I followed the Hard Disk Upgrade mini-howto on the Linux Documentation Project's page. The juicy stuff is in section seven where it tells you how to copy your files. Its important to unmount any non-linux filesystems first, of course (in the how-to). I was successful at moving my Gentoo partitions/files from one disk to another by following the second suggestion, changing the parts of the script referring to "new-disk" to reflect my own mount point, which was /mnt/new, I think.
 
  


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