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Old 02-01-2016, 10:11 AM   #1
jeffreykramer
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Question Linux Mint Installation - Hard Drive Mounting Issues


Hi guys, I'm an absolute newbie so I apologize if I have incorrectly classified this question. I thought maybe you all could help.

I built a brand new pc with a SSD and HD. I wanted to install Linux Mint (Cinnamon 64 bit) so I made a bootable USB.

I unplugged the HD, directed BIOS to boot from the USB, and installed the OS to the SSD. Everything seemed to work fine - I used all of the defaults. I removed the USB, booted from the SSD, and had success.

However, when I go to Computer and try to access the SSD, I get the "Unable to Mount Location" error.

I tried the install again, but first I plugged in the HD. I installed to the SSD, and during installation, set up a partition for the full drive on the HD. The install succeeded and I was able to access the HD without getting the mounting error. However, the SSD still showed the mounting error.

I tried to install for a third time, this time partitioning the SSD. When I attempted to install, it said "no root file system defined". I had specified the file type as ext4.

I'm pretty confused at this point. I am not sure where the mount errors are coming from, especially in the second case. Could anyone help me understand what's going on, or how I can get past this initial hurdle?
 
Old 02-01-2016, 12:33 PM   #2
kasl33
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Are you accepting the defaults during installation for grub bootloader installation location? Typically it is installed to /dev/sda.
 
Old 02-01-2016, 01:10 PM   #3
jeffreykramer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kasl33 View Post
Are you accepting the defaults during installation for grub bootloader installation location? Typically it is installed to /dev/sda.
I believe so. The first time through I accepted all defaults and didn't modify any partitions. I will double-check when I test it more after work.
 
Old 02-01-2016, 01:11 PM   #4
kasl33
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Another question: Are both disks (HD and SSD) both installed, or are either attached via USB, etc?
 
Old 02-01-2016, 01:15 PM   #5
yancek
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Which installation option did you choose. With Mint, you should have at least three. You don't indicate any other operating system installed so if that is the case, the simplest choice is to Erase disk and install Mint. If you have another operating system installed, then the best choice is the "Something Else" option which is a manual install. If you do have another OS installed, you need to indicate what it is.
 
Old 02-01-2016, 01:24 PM   #6
jeffreykramer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kasl33 View Post
Another question: Are both disks (HD and SSD) both installed, or are either attached via USB, etc?
Both are internal. The very first time I tried it, I disconnected the SATA cable for the HD. It installed to the SSD but gave the mounting error when I tried to actually use the drive to save files.

After that I reconnected the SATA for the HD and still installed to the SSD. When I manually partitioned the HD, it worked and did not present the mount problem but the SDD continued to error.

Last edited by jeffreykramer; 02-01-2016 at 01:27 PM.
 
Old 02-01-2016, 01:26 PM   #7
jeffreykramer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yancek View Post
Which installation option did you choose. With Mint, you should have at least three. You don't indicate any other operating system installed so if that is the case, the simplest choice is to Erase disk and install Mint. If you have another operating system installed, then the best choice is the "Something Else" option which is a manual install. If you do have another OS installed, you need to indicate what it is.
It's all brand new, so there's no other OS. The first time I just selected the default install that gave the mount errors. I tried the "Erase and Install" on subsequent attempts. I'll give it another try after work and select that again and document all of the exact steps. However, there is definitely no other OS on the system.
 
Old 02-01-2016, 03:45 PM   #8
purevw
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When you changed the default setup by manually creating a partition, it appears that you did not assign that partition to "/", thus the "no root file system defined" error on that particular install.

Quote:
It installed to the SSD but gave the mounting error when I tried to actually use the drive to save files.
That could be an important clue. It may be that you do not understand the Linux file systems. A regular user is generally not allowed to write to anything outside of their own home directory for security reasons. Where you trying to save files to /home/"your user name"/"any subfolder", or to a different folder above your home? You have to be root to write anything outside of your "home" folder. That being said, you should never do anything as root on any Linux system unless really necessary.

I would re-install, using the defaults. Personally, I prefer a separate "home" partition, but I do not know Mint well enough to know if that would be an easy option for you. If you have no partitioning experience, then I would just take what it gives you. Simpler is often better.
 
Old 02-02-2016, 12:17 PM   #9
Peverel
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First, let me say that I am not familiar with Mint, so I am treating this as a generic Linux problem. I hope that will be helpful.

You speak of discs, which is a little worrying. You have two hard drives , which Linux calls sda and sdb, Each must have at least one partition, called sda1, sda2 and so on. When a partition is used, it has a name: the root partition is called /, and contains the OS. Inside are a number of folders, called /var, /bin, /usr, /root, /home, /run and possibly /mnt, /opt and /media, though nowadays that tends to be /run/media. Some of these contain second level folders, /usr/local for example. Any partition to be accessible to the system must be mounted on one of these, either automatically or by the user.The system when running picks up all available partitions, whether mounted or not: they have names like /dev/sda2. when a partition is mounted it must be on an existing folder, called its mount point, in which case the contents of the mounted partition are treated as if they are in the folder: any content of the folder itself becomes inaccessible.

When installing, the system usually expects separate partitions for /home and possibly /boot, but the user may want others, for example, if you have software from another source, you might want to mount partitions on /opt and/or /usr/local, then updating the OS will not overwrite it. If you have blank drives, the installer offers a partitioning scheme and suggests mount points, if the disks are already partitioned, then just the scheme, which you may edit (though that may involve you setting up your own from scratch.

Root owns all these folders. When a user is specified, say Fred.a folder is inserted in /home, called /home/Fred, to which that user has write access, in fact, is the owner.Root, by the way, also has a private folder, called /root.

Now, maybe we can see the problems. If you install with one drive, then attach the other, the drive names may change: sda may become sdb. Suppose you put both / and /home on sda, so they are on /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2, then you can't apparently access sdb because there are no mounted partitions. You could at installation specify something like /storage or /mnt/storage for sdb1, but then it would be owned by root. Each folder and file has an owner and permissions, to read, to write, to execute. You can change these by logging in as root or using sudo or su, whichever is allowed to you, and then commands such as chown, but usually the is some way of using a system gui to open a folder as superuser (that is, root) accessing the permissions and changing them by, for example, by writing Fred where the owner is specified as root,

A quick and dirty method: install as above, login as root and switch to /storage, create a folder, say Fredspare, change its owner to Fred. Now, when Fred logs in, he has access to /storage/Fredspare (not to /storage, by the way) and can transfer files to and from it.

Hope that helps.

Last edited by Peverel; 02-02-2016 at 12:21 PM. Reason: Correcting literals.
 
Old 02-02-2016, 04:57 PM   #10
TxLonghorn
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How about if we see some specific info on what you have.
Please post the results of the commands:
Code:
cat /etc/fstab
Code:
sudo parted --list
Code:
 ll /dev/disk/by-uuid
 
Old 02-03-2016, 08:55 AM   #11
jeffreykramer
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Thank you all so much for the help. I was able to resolve my issue. The problem was my own misunderstanding of how the Linux file system works. I read through the information you all provided and I was able to understand what I was doing wrong. Everything was working fine, I was misinterpreting the messages I received, and then successfully mounted the HDD. Everything is good now! Thanks so much!
 
Old 02-03-2016, 08:55 AM   #12
jeffreykramer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peverel View Post
First, let me say that I am not familiar with Mint, so I am treating this as a generic Linux problem. I hope that will be helpful.
This was a huge help, thank you!
 
Old 02-26-2016, 12:46 PM   #13
cesarbergara
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Hi. By the way. If you desconect 'SATA HD' and leave 'SATA SSD' on SATA-2 socket, BIOS and kernel read your 'SATA SSD' like sda during install.
When you reconect 'SATA HD', BIOS and kernel read it like sda, and 'SATA SSD' like sdb. I have this problem with a combination of IDE and SATA HDs (Linux Debian 8 read drives different from Debian 6, and lost root partitions during boot with Grub).

Have a nice day.
 
  


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