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Old 11-19-2016, 04:34 PM   #1
OraclePro
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Linux distros


Hello I have an inquiry regarding linux distros. Could anyone suggest me the best linux distro to prep for Linux plus + certification. Also if I decide to use two separate distros side by side then can i use one distro(ubuntu) as a main install and second distro in VMware inside my main distro (ubuntu). Thanks much in advance.
 
Old 11-19-2016, 05:10 PM   #2
crazy-yiuf
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I got my Linux+ not long ago and I just used my usual distro - Debian. I would probably recommend Debian over Ubuntu, since it's less configured out of the box, and probably has less complexity that might obscure some of the objectives. This is just a guess, I haven't used Ubuntu in quite a while.

If you use Fedora, Centos, or Redhat, you'll get to play with cooler LDAP tools, etc., but these aren't really covered by the cert. They have nicer sys admin sugar in general, as far as I can tell.

Multiple distros are totally unnecessary. If you practice with dpkg, memorize the rpm commands, and vice versa. In summary - it doesn't really matter. The only other differences are a few file locations and the network config file formats. These are listed explicitly in the objectives.

As a side note, I actually really liked the Linux+ objectives, but employers seem to have a strong preference for the Redhat series of certificates. If you're just trying to beef up your resume, look at the job postings for your area and make sure you're getting the appropriate cert.

Last edited by crazy-yiuf; 11-19-2016 at 05:14 PM.
 
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Old 11-19-2016, 09:40 PM   #3
AwesomeMachine
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I'd probably choose Red Hat.
 
Old 11-20-2016, 06:00 AM   #4
ardvark71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AwesomeMachine View Post
I'd probably choose Red Hat.
Or CentOS (which is almost identical to RHEL as well as free of charge) if that's not affordable.

Welcome to the forum, OraclePro

Regards...
 
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Old 11-20-2016, 01:09 PM   #5
BW-userx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OraclePro View Post
Hello I have an inquiry regarding linux distros. Could anyone suggest me the best linux distro to prep for Linux plus + certification. Also if I decide to use two separate distros side by side then can i use one distro(ubuntu) as a main install and second distro in VMware inside my main distro (ubuntu). Thanks much in advance.
I think you already know the answer to the second question is yes.
the first question, is anyone of them should work. which ever one you pick better operate the same when it comes to basic unix commands and command line, the only big difference will be where each distro puts some of the conf files for certain apps.

But the basic concept and methodology is the same across the board. the major differences is sysV sysD and other init, and packaging systems each Distro picks to use.

But, still if you look at it closely you'll see that the concept and methodology is still the same.

That part should not even be within the qualification test. It has nothing to do with it in my Option. but they them be, might just put it in there not only because they can but perhaps because they cannot think of anything else to do.


One should be able to install every type of WM/DE on any Linux system. That is not what makes Linux work.

Linux is Linux .. so I do not see what it matters. Just get one you have to learn how to use.

Last edited by BW-userx; 11-20-2016 at 01:16 PM.
 
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Old 11-21-2016, 11:15 AM   #6
DavidMcCann
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In an enterprise environment the tendency is to use Red Hat or SUSE if you're prepared to pay for it, or Debian Stable or a free version of Red Hat (CentOS, Scientific, Springdale) if you aren't and don't need support. You notice that Red Hat / CentOS appears in both categories.

As you might guess from my own choice of distros, I'd recommend CentOS. One nice thing is that the Red Hat on-line documentation can then be used, and that's like an encyclopedia. The Debian wiki doesn't compare in my opinion.
 
Old 11-21-2016, 02:51 PM   #7
crazy-yiuf
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Originally Posted by DavidMcCann View Post
One nice thing is that the Red Hat on-line documentation can then be used, and that's like an encyclopedia. The Debian wiki doesn't compare in my opinion.
This is true. The Debian wiki is often sparse or outdated. The Red Hat documentation is a great source no matter what distro you use. There are a lot of very good sources out there. Another good place to check for some of the more obscure objectives is this site:
https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/lpi/102.html
Note that it's very outdated, and tackles a lot of material that has been removed from the test.

Of course, none of these are "authorized" study materials, so I don't condone their use. But if some deviant was to use online study materials, he or she would probably learn A LOT more than using one of their silly text books. YMMV.
 
Old 11-22-2016, 10:19 AM   #8
DavidMcCann
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crazy-yiuf View Post
This is true. The Debian wiki is often sparse or outdated. The Red Hat documentation is a great source no matter what distro you use.
For the record, let's say a good word for the Arch wiki: that's often less distro-specific and always clear.
 
Old 11-22-2016, 02:13 PM   #9
ceantuco
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I suggest Redhat or CentOS, Debian and OpenSuSE. You can install Debian as your main O/S then run Redhat/CentOS and OpenSuse as virtual machines by using Oracle Virtual Box or KVM. I'll be preparing for Linux+ in the next couple of weeks since a Linux college course that I have to take covers a bit of the Linux+ cert.

Good luck!
 
  


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