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Old 01-14-2019, 06:22 PM   #1
DennyY
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Question Linux career


Hi guys,

So I have been focusing on Linux, and hoping to become a Junior Linux System Administrator somewhere in the near future. I got my first certificate last year, and my goal is to get my second certificate sometime this year. (and also learning Python at the moment).

I have been job hunting for 4 months now. And I feel that having Linux skill seems still not good enough these days.

I have noticed that some companies are also looking for experiences in DevOps and AWS. And I am not sure if either path is the one I am passionate about.

So I guess now my question is besides DevOps and AWS, what else is out there that I should look into?

I am now trying to change my career from business to technical. So I know little about what's out there besdies DevOps and AWS.

Thank you guys,
Denny
 
Old 01-14-2019, 06:58 PM   #2
Ztcoracat
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You could also look into getting Red Hat Certified Engineer certification.

Some employers will give you favor for paying for the test but you have to ask.

https://www.redhat.com/en/services/certification/rhce

Good luck-
 
Old 01-14-2019, 07:10 PM   #3
DennyY
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Smile Linux career

Thank you Z,

The 2nd certificate that I have been studying for is certificed Linux Engineer via LPI.

Now just a bit overwhelmed by those "required skills" that the compmany is looking for in a candidate.

-Denny










Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztcoracat View Post
You could also look into getting Red Hat Certified Engineer certification.

Some employers will give you favor for paying for the test but you have to ask.

https://www.redhat.com/en/services/certification/rhce

Good luck-
 
Old 01-14-2019, 07:17 PM   #4
Ztcoracat
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You're Welcome-

Quote:
The 2nd certificate that I have been studying for is certificed Linux Engineer via LPI.
That's GREAT!-

Try calling your local college or go through your newspaper; you might be able to find an employer that needs a Linux Administrator.
Sometimes the college professor that is teaching the Linux courses can point you in the right direction.

https://www.indeed.com/q-Linux-Administrator-jobs.html

https://www.glassdoor.com/Job/linux-...RCH_KO0,19.htm

Wish you the best of luck-
 
Old 01-14-2019, 07:38 PM   #5
DennyY
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Question Linux career

Thanks again for the info. Z,

Now my question is "what else should I learn"? (besides Python)

By the way, money is not the main thing I am looking for at the moment. The main reason that I am switching from business to technical is because I want to challenge myself with something I never learned before.

Sorry if I confused you or anyone with my question before. I guess what I am trying to say is all the companies required "different skills". And now I don't know what else I should be focused on besdies Linux. For example, this company is looking for someone who knows Puppet, and the other company is looking for someone who knows Azure.

I hope I am making more sense now.

Thanks again,
Denny







Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztcoracat View Post
You're Welcome-


That's GREAT!-

Try calling your local college or go through your newspaper; you might be able to find an employer that needs a Linux Administrator.
Sometimes the college professor that is teaching the Linux courses can point you in the right direction.

https://www.indeed.com/q-Linux-Administrator-jobs.html

https://www.glassdoor.com/Job/linux-...RCH_KO0,19.htm

Wish you the best of luck-
 
Old 01-14-2019, 08:02 PM   #6
Ztcoracat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DennyY View Post
Thanks again for the info. Z,

Now my question is "what else should I learn"? (besides Python)

By the way, money is not the main thing I am looking for at the moment. The main reason that I am switching from business to technical is because I want to challenge myself with something I never learned before.

Sorry if I confused you or anyone with my question before. I guess what I am trying to say is all the companies required "different skills". And now I don't know what else I should be focused on besdies Linux. For example, this company is looking for someone who knows Puppet, and the other company is looking for someone who knows Azure.

I hope I am making more sense now.

Thanks again,
Denny
Learn Bash scripting. Python, Perl, Ruby and the like:-

Azure, yeah you may want to learn how to run that and other BSD systems. That way you'll have it on your resume'.

Quote:
I am switching from business to technical is because I want to challenge myself with something I never learned before.
I appreciate that. I went from 16 years of Dentistry to Art and Linux.-

The link to my art work is under my signature if you'd like to take a look.
 
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Old 01-14-2019, 09:00 PM   #7
DennyY
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Question Linux career

Can not thank you enough for the info.

By the way, aren't Ruby and Perl mainly used for web applications and developers?

-Denny





Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztcoracat View Post
Learn Bash scripting. Python, Perl, Ruby and the like:-

Azure, yeah you may want to learn how to run that and other BSD systems. That way you'll have it on your resume'.



I appreciate that. I went from 16 years of Dentistry to Art and Linux.-

The link to my art work is under my signature if you'd like to take a look.
 
Old 01-14-2019, 09:43 PM   #8
Ztcoracat
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Always glad to help.

I'm not sure if Ruby and Perl are for web apps:-

Let us know how things go.
 
Old 01-14-2019, 10:23 PM   #9
FlinchX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztcoracat View Post
Always glad to help.

I'm not sure if Ruby and Perl are for web apps:-

Let us know how things go.
Ruby on Rails is still quite popular
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 01-14-2019, 10:32 PM   #10
wpeckham
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztcoracat View Post
Always glad to help.

I'm not sure if Ruby and Perl are for web apps:-

Let us know how things go.
Ruby is used for Web Apps, but is not limited to that use.
Perl is used for EVERYTHING, including SSA, WebApps, and system utilities. It is, perhaps, the most powerful and limitless scripting language around: thus its nickname "The Swiss Army Chainsaw". (The Author once claimed PERL stood for "Pathologically Eclectic Rubbish Lister" due to the power it had handling text: we THINK he was kidding.) Python is the only newer scripting language that comes close to it for general utility and power. I prefer to use both of them, although seldom at the same time.

If you become a strong BASH coder, that makes you a power to be considered. If you add PERL, you become a solution master. Every additional power tool you master makes you more desirable as a candidate.
 
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Old 01-14-2019, 10:37 PM   #11
chrism01
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Well, Perl is used a lot for sysadmin utils - in fact there is book for that https://docstore.mik.ua/orelly/perl/sysadmin/index.htm.

Puppet uses a lot of Ruby ...

You should learn some SQL and one or two of the databases that use it eg MySQL, PostgreSQL.
 
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Old 01-15-2019, 11:15 AM   #12
ehartman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrism01 View Post
eg MySQL,
Cq. MariaDB that in a lot of distributions has replaced it, see mariadb.org.

In commercial organisations Oracle www.oracle.com/database/ is used a lot too and that company is also marketing its own, RHEL derived, Linux distribution, Oracle Linux.

Last edited by ehartman; 01-15-2019 at 11:20 AM.
 
Old 01-15-2019, 11:37 AM   #13
Turbocapitalist
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Keep learning and gradually find an intersection between what you like and what is marketable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ztcoracat View Post
Learn Bash scripting. Python, Perl, Ruby and the like:-
+1 to those. POSIX Shell + Bash is essential. Perl5 is quite important, too. Between those two you'll have system scripting covered. Python is starting to show up there as well in some settings.

The quick start I usually recommend is learning how to do 1) shell scripting, 2) lots of SSH tricks, 3) proper configuration of /etc/sudoers.

For the POSIX shell scripting (as well as Bash) there are many guides online. The Wooledge guides are quite good for learning that but there are many other good ones.

For SSH, there are a lot of bad guides online. Instead, I'd recommend a print copy of Michael W Lucas' SSH Mastery or else working through at least the beginning of each cookbook chapter in The Wikibook on OpenSSH.

For /etc/sudoers, there are not so many good guides either. Though I did rant about sudo a bit and the rant covers some of the main uses.

Last edited by Turbocapitalist; 01-15-2019 at 11:39 AM. Reason: links
 
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Old 01-15-2019, 12:09 PM   #14
DennyY
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Smile Linux career

Thank you all for those valuable informations!

Now the toughest challenge for me is it's easy for me to forget what I learned since I don't use some of these tools everyday (mainly due to work environment).
I learn at night and on the weekends.

Can't wait to get my foot in the door, and putting all I learned in daily use!

-Denny
 
Old 01-15-2019, 02:15 PM   #15
Mara
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If you haven't done it before, get an inexpensive (older) platform and set up a server with web, email, databases etc. Configure it correctly. You may ask someone to do security testing for you or just look around in the system to find out what you can do differently. You can also volounteer as a part-time admin for a school, local group etc. They always need admins and you can get your first experience this way.
 
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