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Old 07-21-2014, 08:30 PM   #1
budbeaty
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Linux and NewEgg combo


I purchased a Newegg combo (case, power supply, mother board, CPU, hard drives, and DVD burner) with the intent of running Linux on it. I have taken the Test on Linux Distribution Chooser and will probably go with Ubuntu. Is there a place to go for advise from others who have already put together a Newegg combo with Linux?
 
Old 07-21-2014, 08:51 PM   #2
onebuck
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Member Response

Hi,

No problem, I have built several systems from Newegg parts. You did not specify whether the Motherboards is UEFI.

I would get a good diagnostic like SystemRescueCD;
Quote:
SystemRescueCd <- 'is a Linux system on a bootable CD-ROM for repairing your system and recovering your data after a crash. It aims to provide an easy way to carry out admin tasks on your computer, such as creating and editing the partitions of the hard disk. It contains a lot of system utilities (parted, partimage, fstools, ...) and basic tools (editors, midnight commander, network tools).' + 'Online-Manual
That way you can use memtest86+ to verify memory without errors. You will have several other diagnostics on the SystemRescueCD to help you with the build. I do not use Ubuntu but it seems a UEFI install is doable.

Hope this helps.
Have fun & enjoy!
 
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Old 07-21-2014, 11:40 PM   #3
budbeaty
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Thank you -- I sure appreciate your prompt reply and very helpful advise. In answer to your question -- the Motherboard is NOT UEFI. Should I consider another Distribution?
 
Old 07-22-2014, 06:40 AM   #4
onebuck
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Member Response

Hi,

The choice is yours. I am not a fan of hold your hand distributions. I use Slackware and have been using Slackware since it was first released. Slackware's 21st birthday was on July 16,2014. Oldest active distribution still in use. Once you slack you will find a stable machine so why choose something else.

LiveCD would be a way to test drive on the new hardware. Look at;
Quote:
LiveCD:
The LiveCD List <- Very Good List
LiveCD Wiki <- 'Good detailed explanation plus resource'
Live USB:
Live USB_Wiki <- 'A live USB is a USB flash drive or a USB external hard disk drive containing a full operating system which can be booted. Live USBs are closely related to live CDs, but typically have the ability to save settings and permanently install software packages back onto the USB device.' + 'system administration, data recovery method' + includes distribution table reference
Hope this helps.
Have fun & enjoy!

Last edited by onebuck; 07-22-2014 at 04:37 PM. Reason: typo
 
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Old 07-22-2014, 07:03 AM   #5
budbeaty
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Excellent advise -- thank you sir.
 
Old 07-22-2014, 03:15 PM   #6
jpollard
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The only suggestion I have is to double check the motherboard.

Frequently there are a number of embedded controllers that say "linux compatible" but aren't really. This shouldn't be a problem for most controllers - but some have a "raid" controller in front of the SCSI controllers, and you can't always bypass the raid controller to get direct access to the SCSI (this was my problem). Fortunately, my motherboard also had 5 SATA connections that I could use in place of the 8 SAS connections (provided through the unusable RAID controller).

Other than that, I'm happy with the motherboard.
 
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Old 07-22-2014, 04:45 PM   #7
Habitual
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I see no mention of any Network Interface Card, or "NIC"... Will this host be needing to "on" the internet?
 
Old 07-22-2014, 05:18 PM   #8
suicidaleggroll
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Habitual View Post
I see no mention of any Network Interface Card, or "NIC"... Will this host be needing to "on" the internet?
I'm about a billion percent sure there will be a NIC integrated into the motherboard...
 
Old 07-22-2014, 05:53 PM   #9
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depending on the board, generally, I don't rely on on-board NICs to work, so I bought one for my Gigabyte Z77-D3SH 'just in case', and it fit like a glove.
 
Old 07-24-2014, 06:51 AM   #10
budbeaty
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Thanks for the excellent input.

My motherboard doesn't indicate that it has SCSI. It does have 4 SATA connections with RAID support. Hope that's not going to be a problem.

I will need internet access -- probably through my WiFi router since I have another desktop PC already wired to the router.

All the parts have arrived (I think), so now it's time to put it together and see what happens. I had already downloaded Ubuntu, so will probably install it for now. Thanks again for the great advice.
 
Old 07-24-2014, 07:55 AM   #11
onebuck
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Member Response

Hi,

I suggest that you create a written system log at the start. Document all the specs for component manufacture model, Serial number along with device specifications. That way you will have on hand information that can be of use in the future. I even document the BIOS information, version, build and type under the motherboard specifications. You can extend the system log as the the build progresses whenever you encounter issues and then placing the solution within the log. I use college ruled 70 page spiral notebooks that cost me <$.25/spiral during Walmart's school sales. I will number each page, do not remove or erase errors, just line out then initial with time stamp. This technique is used throughout industry to document. Lab books are one area this is used to document issues/results with LAB stations. That way anyone can read the entries to get a feel for the status of a station. The same is true for a computer system.

By documenting each system you will have good library of information that does not rely on your memory for a way to trail things. This technique has saved me more than once.

Hope this helps.
Have fun & enjoy!
 
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Old 07-24-2014, 09:03 PM   #12
budbeaty
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Excellent advice -- I'll definitely follow it to the letter. Already have some ruled spiral notebooks that we bought for my grandaughter many years ago and she later returned to us unused. Now I have a good use for at least one of them. I know it will surely pay big in the long run. Thank you!
 
  


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