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Old 01-24-2017, 06:45 PM   #1
SilentJustice
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Exclamation Kali Linux 'dd: error writing /dev/sdb: no space left'


Hello,

So I'm trying to make a live USB for Kali Linux and I was just about to put the ISO for Kali on the USB until I got this error.

"dd: error writing '/dev/sdb:': No space left on device
1978+0 records in
1977+0 records out
1036660736 bytes (1.0 GB, 989 MiB) copied, 27.7732 s, 37.3 MB/s"

My USB is 16 GB and the Kali ISO is only 3. Is there anyway to fix this?
I'm very new to this, so please explain it in as much detail as you can while still remaining in Layman's terms.

Thank you,
Michael
 
Old 01-24-2017, 07:02 PM   #2
suicidaleggroll
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Please post the output of "fdisk -l" as root.
Also, what was the dd command that you used?

Also, if you're new to Linux, you shouldn't be using Kali. Even Kali's developers say that it's not for people new to Linux. It's for security professionals who already know exactly what they're doing.

Last edited by suicidaleggroll; 01-24-2017 at 07:03 PM.
 
Old 01-24-2017, 07:02 PM   #3
goumba
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Can you post the output of
Code:
fdisk -l /dev/sdb
What was the exact command you used?
 
Old 01-24-2017, 07:27 PM   #4
SilentJustice
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suicidaleggroll View Post
Please post the output of "fdisk -l" as root.
Also, what was the dd command that you used?

Also, if you're new to Linux, you shouldn't be using Kali. Even Kali's developers say that it's not for people new to Linux. It's for security professionals who already know exactly what they're doing.

Yes I know that its very difficult, but I only have one specific thing I have to do on it and then I wont use it again. But thats not important, the output i got was

"Disk /dev/sda: 40 GiB, 42949672960 bytes, 83886080 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xbecf30ae

Device Boot Start End Sectors Size Id Type
/dev/sda1 * 2048 79691775 79689728 38G 83 Linux
/dev/sda2 79693822 83884031 4190210 2G 5 Extended
/dev/sda5 79693824 83884031 4190208 2G 82 Linux swap / Solaris"

The EXACT command i used was dd if=Desktop/kali-linux-2016.2-amd64.iso of=/dev/sdb: bs=512k
 
Old 01-24-2017, 07:28 PM   #5
SilentJustice
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goumba View Post
Can you post the output of
Code:
fdisk -l /dev/sdb
What was the exact command you used?
This was the output:

"fdisk: cannot open /dev/sdb: No medium found"

This was the command I used:

The EXACT command i used was dd if=Desktop/kali-linux-2016.2-amd64.iso of=/dev/sdb: bs=512k

Last edited by SilentJustice; 01-24-2017 at 07:30 PM. Reason: I posted the wrong output
 
Old 01-24-2017, 07:33 PM   #6
suicidaleggroll
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Your USB drive needs to be plugged in when you run fdisk
 
Old 01-24-2017, 07:34 PM   #7
SilentJustice
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suicidaleggroll View Post
Your USB drive needs to be plugged in when you run fdisk
It is plugged in
 
Old 01-24-2017, 07:56 PM   #8
af7567
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If it is plugged in, it's either not sdb (maybe that's your DVD drive?) or it's gone wrong.
You also have an extra : when setting the output file on the dd command

Quote:
The EXACT command i used was dd if=Desktop/kali-linux-2016.2-amd64.iso of=/dev/sdb: bs=512k
should be
Code:
The EXACT command i used was dd if=Desktop/kali-linux-2016.2-amd64.iso of=/dev/sdb bs=512k
That means your dd command probably created a new file in /dev called sdb: and filled it up until your /dev ran out of free space.


Try unplugging your USB drive then running 'dmesg -c' to print and clear dmesg. Then plug the USB drive back in and run 'dmesg' and see what it says. It should show that you have plugged in a USB storage device and tell you what partitions are on it.

Last edited by af7567; 01-24-2017 at 08:00 PM. Reason: the bold : didn't really stand out in the quote
 
Old 01-24-2017, 08:41 PM   #9
morbius
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sounds like the drive is not formatted properly, and the system cannot see the actual size of it. have you used this device for another ISO? if so, then you need to format it again, double check that it reports the correct size then try the command again
 
Old 01-24-2017, 09:26 PM   #10
SilentJustice
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Quote:
Originally Posted by af7567 View Post
If it is plugged in, it's either not sdb (maybe that's your DVD drive?) or it's gone wrong.
You also have an extra : when setting the output file on the dd command


should be
Code:
The EXACT command i used was dd if=Desktop/kali-linux-2016.2-amd64.iso of=/dev/sdb bs=512k
That means your dd command probably created a new file in /dev called sdb: and filled it up until your /dev ran out of free space.


Try unplugging your USB drive then running 'dmesg -c' to print and clear dmesg. Then plug the USB drive back in and run 'dmesg' and see what it says. It should show that you have plugged in a USB storage device and tell you what partitions are on it.
Well, how could i check if its my dvd drive? And Im not sure how it could have gone wrong, i followed the instructions to the tee without error. And how can i delete that file? I also cleared all the partitions on it before this. Thats what the instructions said to do. Ill let you know what happens when i run dmesg.
 
Old 01-24-2017, 09:27 PM   #11
SilentJustice
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Quote:
Originally Posted by morbius View Post
sounds like the drive is not formatted properly, and the system cannot see the actual size of it. have you used this device for another ISO? if so, then you need to format it again, double check that it reports the correct size then try the command again
No, I have not. And how can I format it properly?
 
Old 01-24-2017, 09:29 PM   #12
goumba
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SilentJustice View Post
No, I have not. And how can I format it properly?
Formatting a device has nothing to do with what you want to do. What you get that chance, run dmesg as described above. The device name (be it sdb, sdc, whatever) will be shown, for example, if I plug a drive into my port:

Code:
[20808.473092] scsi 2:0:0:0: Direct-Access     Lexar    USB Flash Drive  1100 PQ: 0 ANSI: 6
[20808.475187] sd 2:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg1 type 0
[20808.477468] sd 2:0:0:0: [sdb] 250068992 512-byte logical blocks: (128 GB/119 GiB)
[20808.477988] sd 2:0:0:0: [sdb] Write Protect is off
[20808.477998] sd 2:0:0:0: [sdb] Mode Sense: 43 00 00 00
[20808.480302] sd 2:0:0:0: [sdb] Write cache: enabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA
[20808.493051]  sdb: sdb1 sdb2 sdb3
[20808.495726] sd 2:0:0:0: [sdb] Attached SCSI removable disk
so, sdb is the device name I'd use with the dd command. Yours will likely be different.

Last edited by goumba; 01-24-2017 at 09:32 PM.
 
Old 01-24-2017, 09:52 PM   #13
SilentJustice
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Quote:
Originally Posted by af7567 View Post
If it is plugged in, it's either not sdb (maybe that's your DVD drive?) or it's gone wrong.
You also have an extra : when setting the output file on the dd command


should be
Code:
The EXACT command i used was dd if=Desktop/kali-linux-2016.2-amd64.iso of=/dev/sdb bs=512k
That means your dd command probably created a new file in /dev called sdb: and filled it up until your /dev ran out of free space.


Try unplugging your USB drive then running 'dmesg -c' to print and clear dmesg. Then plug the USB drive back in and run 'dmesg' and see what it says. It should show that you have plugged in a USB storage device and tell you what partitions are on it.

When I ran the revised command I should have done, it just says that directory doesnt exist.
 
Old 01-24-2017, 10:02 PM   #14
goumba
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SilentJustice View Post
When I ran the revised command I should have done, it just says that directory doesnt exist.
Because it's likely not sdb you want. See my previous post.
 
Old 01-24-2017, 10:08 PM   #15
SilentJustice
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Quote:
Originally Posted by af7567 View Post
If it is plugged in, it's either not sdb (maybe that's your DVD drive?) or it's gone wrong.
You also have an extra : when setting the output file on the dd command


should be
Code:
The EXACT command i used was dd if=Desktop/kali-linux-2016.2-amd64.iso of=/dev/sdb bs=512k
That means your dd command probably created a new file in /dev called sdb: and filled it up until your /dev ran out of free space.


Try unplugging your USB drive then running 'dmesg -c' to print and clear dmesg. Then plug the USB drive back in and run 'dmesg' and see what it says. It should show that you have plugged in a USB storage device and tell you what partitions are on it.

I couldnt post the output i got the first time I ran dmesg -c because it exceeded the amount of characters, but this was the output I got with the USB plugged in using dmesg.


Code:
[  388.508243] usb 1-1: new high-speed USB device number 2 using ehci-pci
[  388.841175] usb 1-1: New USB device found, idVendor=0781, idProduct=5575
[  388.841183] usb 1-1: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=3
[  388.841187] usb 1-1: Product: Cruzer Glide
[  388.841190] usb 1-1: Manufacturer: SanDisk
[  388.841192] usb 1-1: SerialNumber: 20043512301B01803B24
[  388.978711] usb-storage 1-1:1.0: USB Mass Storage device detected
[  388.981028] scsi host3: usb-storage 1-1:1.0
[  388.981278] usbcore: registered new interface driver usb-storage
[  388.996652] usbcore: registered new interface driver uas
[  389.994105] scsi 3:0:0:0: Direct-Access     SanDisk  Cruzer Glide     1.27 PQ: 0 ANSI: 6
[  389.996103] sd 3:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg2 type 0
[  390.018961] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdb] 30316544 512-byte logical blocks: (15.5 GB/14.5 GiB)
[  390.033505] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdb] Write Protect is off
[  390.033515] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdb] Mode Sense: 43 00 00 00
[  390.051196] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdb] Write cache: disabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA
[  390.144847]  sdb:
[  390.212902] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdb] Attached SCSI removable disk

Last edited by SilentJustice; 01-24-2017 at 10:10 PM.
 
  


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