LinuxQuestions.org
Help answer threads with 0 replies.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 07-18-2018, 08:05 AM   #1
Asios
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2018
Posts: 4

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Wink Just need some pointers


TL;DR - Secure, stable, update fequency low, window-ish, moderate learning curve. Is slackware a good starting point?

Total newb here. Just need some pointers. Little about my computer background, started with ibm (dos/basic), used apple in school, 1st pc win 98.
I have a 1yr old rig: amd ryzen 1700 3.8, asrock x370 taichi, 32g gskill trident z 3200 cl14, evga gtx 1080 ti ftw3, corsair 760 atx psu, 1tb nvme m2 980 evo ssd. Power isnt a problem.

So before you say "not another "which linux is right for me" question", ive narrowed it down. BUT, some things to consider.

Been reading about several different aspects of linux and linux distros.

Ive heard to stay away from Manjaro? Something about shady devs?

A lot of talk about Systemd? Some say its a conspiracy or security risk?

Void is a botnet managed by microsoft or something like that?

So ive narrowed it down to Kubuntu (systemd), Zorin (systemd, pay for better support?) Or slackware (no systemd, but moderate learning curve).

My goal is to totally convert to Linux, but for now i'll dual boot. Which leads to another question. I've read dual booting from same device (hdd, ssd) isnt optimal/safe? Will dual boot win 10 pro build 1709 (1803 has forced updates only stopped by using Nsudo, hence revert back to 1709 and convert to Linux)

I took the online quiz about the whole which linux question. Was interesting but seemed to contradict itself?

Obviously if i want to fully convert or at the very least use Linux as a daily driver i'll have to learn it and ive heard good things about Slackware.

Kubuntu - its window-ish beginner learning (systemd)

Zorin - most window-ish, beginner learning (systemd/paid support)

Slackware - heard very good things, moderate learning curve, no systemd.

Security is highest priorty. Ive heard Linux is immune or at least way more secure than windows? Then i read about systemd and botnets, stuff i really have no idea about, how secure is Linux?

Id like windowish, but its not a deal breaker.

Im more than willing to learn Linux, whatever that may entail.

Stable with least updates. Im seeing some versions are 6 month updates and some are weekly. Id like to stay away from weekly.

Read something about when updating, not to be connected to internet? Something about while its updating it can be comprimised?

Should I just start simple, like zorin or kubuntu and go from there or just jump right into Slackware? Id like to not distro hop/jump w/e. Although its looking like thats whats going to happen.

Im leaning towards slackware atm. Its also 25yrs in the making, i like that, i like that a lot. Are any other distros this old? Willing to donate if i like them, to keep them going.

Any advice and or info to clear up any misconceptions is much appreciated.

Thanks
 
Old 07-18-2018, 12:32 PM   #2
jsbjsb001
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: Earth, unfortunately...
Distribution: Currently: OpenMandriva. Previously: openSUSE, PCLinuxOS, CentOS, among others over the years.
Posts: 3,881

Rep: Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063
Don't get me wrong, there's nothing wrong with Slackware, but it's a very steep learning curve, not an easy one for the newbie.

Honestly, I'd say Kubuntu would probably be the easiest out of the distributions you mention.

Void Linux is not a "botnet", it's just having/had some "management issues".
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-18-2018, 12:46 PM   #3
hydrurga
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2008
Location: Pictland
Distribution: Linux Mint 21 MATE
Posts: 8,048
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925
Pointers?

Forget (almost) everything you've read about systemd. It's fine, just not everyone's cup of tea. Don't base which distro you select on whether or not it has systemd until you know far more about the issue.

You may not want to distro hop but you should at least try out different desktop environments (using live media or virtual machines) to find the one you feel more comfortable with.

Slackware is solid but not for newbies (imho). In all probability, you will not find your perfect distro from day 1 anyway.

Go for a LTS distro. Kubuntu sounds fine. Ubuntu MATE is also nice.

There's no need for you to pay for a distro or support for it.

Take your time. Listen to less gossip on the internet about distro maintainers etc. That includes tinfoil hat security "experts" (e.g. those who say you shouldn't connect to your system while updating it because of potential system compromise). Common sense will usually see you good.
 
3 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-18-2018, 01:15 PM   #4
rtmistler
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Location: USA
Distribution: MINT Debian, Angstrom, SUSE, Ubuntu, Debian
Posts: 9,885
Blog Entries: 13

Rep: Reputation: 4931Reputation: 4931Reputation: 4931Reputation: 4931Reputation: 4931Reputation: 4931Reputation: 4931Reputation: 4931Reputation: 4931Reputation: 4931Reputation: 4931
Welcome Asios,

Well I did read and you "mentioned" a ton of concerns that you've heard or read about, however you offered no reference material.

Things are fine under the category of "word of mouth", however please consider the source. And then the source is either reliable or not.

You mentioned three distributions, Lubuntu, Zorin, and Slackware.

Have you actually tried any of them? There are various ways to try: (1) old computer, just install it (2) live boot media such as USB or DVD, or (3) virtual machine.

Please "try" something and tell us more about what you think, and not about what you've heard or read, unless you actually cite a link.

By not having taken any apparent forward moving actions and instead citing various concerns about things like bad development, systemd, security risks, and actually use the word conspiracy in your written thoughts, then this is precisely what you say it was not intended to be. It is exactly "yet another new person asking for an entire handout recommendation about what distribution to try".
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-18-2018, 01:24 PM   #5
brianL
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Oldham, Lancs, England
Distribution: Slackware64 15; SlackwareARM-current (aarch64); Debian 12
Posts: 8,302
Blog Entries: 61

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asios View Post
TL;DR - Secure, stable, update fequency low, window-ish, moderate learning curve. Is slackware a good starting point?
Yes. If you're of average intelligence, can read and follow instructions, and don't mind putting a little effort into learning, then Slackware might suit you. If you're prepared to try a few distros for yourself and not depend on the opinions of others, all the better.
 
Old 07-18-2018, 01:29 PM   #6
Turbocapitalist
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Distribution: Linux Mint, Devuan, OpenBSD
Posts: 7,379
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772
The main thing is to try a few. If you are interested in Kubuntu, then you might also try Xubuntu. There are also several Linux Mint variants to look at too. The main thing you'll notice would be the default desktop environment and hidden underneath that the window manager. However, whatever the default settings and applications, you can add, remove, or reconfigure packages until one distro is just like another. The idea is to adjust it to your needs. When you've tried a few via USB stick then you can try out the finalist(s) as a full installation.

As to systemd, as a regular user it won't bit you on the ass too often. Though it can happen, it got me earlier this month while people were watching during a demo built from a default setup. Instead you are more likely to get trouble from it if you start to move into serious system administration. So don't worry there ... yet ... much.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-18-2018, 01:34 PM   #7
Asios
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2018
Posts: 4

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Thanks!

Yeah i kinda figured i'll be distro hopping in the beginning.

For now i'll start with Kubuntu. I read booting from usb is good to start out with when distro hopping? I just dont want to keep formating my m2.

Thanks again!
 
Old 07-18-2018, 01:37 PM   #8
jsbjsb001
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: Earth, unfortunately...
Distribution: Currently: OpenMandriva. Previously: openSUSE, PCLinuxOS, CentOS, among others over the years.
Posts: 3,881

Rep: Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063
You could always just install some virtual machine software and at worst, just delete the VM. We have all distro hopped before, no shame in it.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-18-2018, 01:46 PM   #9
hydrurga
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2008
Location: Pictland
Distribution: Linux Mint 21 MATE
Posts: 8,048
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925Reputation: 2925
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsbjsb001 View Post
You could always just install some virtual machine software and at worst, just delete the VM. We have all distro hopped before, no shame in it.
Indeed. It's a great way of choosing a suitable distro. The only time that I don't think distro hopping is so great is when I see folk who do it every time they encounter a single problem with a distro - "Something's not working, quick, on to the next distro!". There will always be a few things to resolve with any distro to get it just the way you want it, unless you're easily satisfied, so I feel sorry when I see folk not showing any tenacity at all before giving up on a distro.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-18-2018, 01:49 PM   #10
jsbjsb001
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: Earth, unfortunately...
Distribution: Currently: OpenMandriva. Previously: openSUSE, PCLinuxOS, CentOS, among others over the years.
Posts: 3,881

Rep: Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063Reputation: 2063
Quote:
Originally Posted by hydrurga View Post
...The only time that I don't think distro hopping is so great is when I see folk who do it every time they encounter a single problem with a distro - "Something's not working, quick, on to the next distro!". There will always be a few things to resolve with any distro to get it just the way you want it, unless you're easily satisfied, so I feel sorry when I see folk not showing any tenacity at all before giving up on a distro.
The ironic thing about that is, that's what happened when I first installed CentOS, and now it's my main system.

@Asios, I'm not suggesting CentOS, stick with Kubuntu, etc, at least until you figure stuff out.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-18-2018, 07:18 PM   #11
Asios
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2018
Posts: 4

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Sooooo, all i did was rufus Kubuntu iso, boot from usb and im in? Im typing this in Kubuntu atm. I didnt install anything lol! Now theres an install kubuntu icon, but it doesnt show the usb to install to usb, so am I assuming that just booting from usb is all i had to do? Meaning kubuntu is already installed on usb? There wasnt a ton of info on exactly how to do this and i did this for win 10 to install to ssd, but is that correct? just rufus iso to usb and boot from usb and it runs?

another surprise was my evga gtx 1080 ti ftw3 has 3 fans, which can only be run by evga precision x. nothing else will run all 3 fans. I mention this because it has a low hum, which means the fans are spinning very slowy or only 1 fan is running. Usually they run a little higher at idle and I was like, oh noes, i need precision x and found out evga doesnt support linux for that particular app. So bummed, i looked at my gpu and low and behold all 3 fans are running. *explosion* mind blown!

ok, i'll not bore you all with my 30 minute experience so far.

Quote:
whatever the default settings and applications, you can add, remove, or reconfigure packages until one distro is just like another. The idea is to adjust it to your needs
.

as of right now, theyre acting like Mac.... which i dont like. I'll figure it out though, thanks for the tip. Time to go explore!

THanks again all! Im definitely converting to linux, windows can suck it! Im wondering why this isnt the OS of choice and why it took me so long to change!

btw, my wife wants it now lol!
 
Old 07-19-2018, 02:45 AM   #12
Turbocapitalist
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Distribution: Linux Mint, Devuan, OpenBSD
Posts: 7,379
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772Reputation: 3772
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asios View Post
Meaning kubuntu is already installed on usb? There wasnt a ton of info on exactly how to do this and i did this for win 10 to install to ssd, but is that correct? just rufus iso to usb and boot from usb and it runs?
Yep. That's a "Live" version of the distro. Everything goes away at the end of the session unless you go out of the way to set up a partition for persistent settings on the unused part of the USB stick. Most Live distros have that. Play with a few and take notes about what you add or remove. Then when you are ready to move to the SSD, you'll be able to follow a plan and get up and running quickly.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-19-2018, 07:00 AM   #13
Asios
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2018
Posts: 4

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Awesome.

Thanks again!
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[SOLVED] C - why pointers? szboardstretcher Programming 26 11-07-2014 07:51 AM
[SOLVED] Freeing pointers to pointers devnull10 Programming 24 07-26-2012 04:58 AM
C++ pointers Dinithion Programming 12 04-06-2009 04:35 AM
About pointers RHLinuxGUY Programming 4 11-15-2005 04:47 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:45 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration