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Old 01-17-2017, 07:06 AM   #1
sunilchand
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Registered: Jan 2017
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Just Entered Into The Linux World!! Don't Know how to move ahead with Self Study and Practice !!


Hello Techie's!! Hope you all are fine and doing well ! Actually, I am thinking of learning Linux on my own without any help of expensive coaching center or training center! Is it possible to learn professional level Linux by self study and with the internet. If possible! How to get started and from where! As you all guys here seems quite professional or individual having enough knowledge about open source and Linux technology! What I want you, what suggestion you want to give me to attain my goal and learn Linux on my own, any special book or you want to recommend! It will be very helpful.

Warm Regards
Sunil
 
Old 01-17-2017, 07:23 AM   #2
Turbocapitalist
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Welcome.

It's definitely possible to learn on your own. You'll find guides and tutorials around, as well as help here, for just about any activity you could choose to pursue. Then of course you have the essential part which is trying things on your own and experimenting.

So, which activities are you interested in starting with?

About getting started in general, if you haven't already chosen a distro, you might choose a beginner-friendly one like Linux Mint. It has two variants, but the differences are all in what is pre-installed and/or preconfigured. Within certain limits (which you might never encounter yourself) you can make any distro to look, feel, and behave like any other by adding or removing programs and adjusting the configurations.
 
Old 01-17-2017, 07:58 AM   #3
dlb101010
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Welcome sunilchand!

I think you'll enjoy the journey you're about to begin. Linux has been step-wise crafted by some very clever people into a brilliant but accessible technological wonder. And people like us are free to use and tinker and experiment with it, and we're even encouraged to do so.

Getting started with Linux and putting it to good use as your computer's operating system is surprisingly easy. True, there can be glitches when installing Linux and configuring the hardware to work, but those are relatively rare, and people in forums like this one are willing to help if that should happen.

To be sure, Linux has a steep learning curve if you want to understand its many, many intricate facets. And there are challenges and frustrations when putting the power of Linux to use for a specific job, such as running a server, or crunching numbers and organizing them into a database, etc.. But that describes any worthwhile intellectual endeavor, whether taking a calculus course or studying a musical instrument.

If you're an eager learning and like sharpening your mind on a tool that'll be of use and will be available for the rest of your life, Linux won't disappoint.

All the best,
Dave
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 01-17-2017, 08:04 AM   #4
rtmistler
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Hi Sunil,

Just about the only way to learn Linux "is" to learn it on your own.

I suggest installing Linux, trying out several distributions either via Live boot, Virtual Machine, or installing and working with it. In short ... immersion.

One great book is www.google.com
Another great book is www.wikipedia.org
And as you already know, a final great book is www.linuxquestions.org

The best part is that this is all free!
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 01-17-2017, 09:43 AM   #5
rokytnji
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Think of it like learning another language. You won't master a new language in a few days. Or A few months. But will feel comfy speaking it in a year or 2. Best way to learn another language on your own is to hang out every day with the people that speak that language. Surrounding your self with folks speaking and you do not understand a durn thing coming out of their mouths.


You will also learn that your native language has no bearing on interpreting what they are talking about. So when you say in Windows I do this. It is like saying to another in different country speaking a different language. In English that is a duck.

They just look at you and shake their heads. Because they do not live in land where English language is a priority, like it is to you. In fact. Some of them may dislike people who speak English. Because they consider them not to be trusted.

For stuff to read to learn the ropes a little. Refer to members signatures in this forum when they reply. Like the links in mine.

Edit: I'll leave you this nice intro from a new member.

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...4/#post5655604

Last edited by rokytnji; 01-17-2017 at 10:06 AM.
 
Old 01-17-2017, 10:07 AM   #6
jamison20000e
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Wink

Spin that disk, unless you're lucky SSD j? ...more links:
 
Old 01-18-2017, 12:56 AM   #7
Jjanel
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Welcome sunilchand! Your enthusiasm is GREAT!
The 'answer' is to JUMP IN immediately!

*MY* way was VirtualBox on Windows, but a 'real' install is 'better' tho [a little] 'harder'.
(There's even http://LinuxZoo.net IF all you have is a web-browser, you can be IN Linux in TWO minutes )

What PC resources do you have?
What area of Linux interests you most: CLI internals or GUI applications?

Enjoy! Let us know as you progress.
(Tip: include the web-search keywords you used for question)

Last edited by Jjanel; 01-18-2017 at 01:08 AM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 01-18-2017, 04:22 AM   #8
sunilchand
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turbocapitalist View Post
Welcome.

It's definitely possible to learn on your own. You'll find guides and tutorials around, as well as help here, for just about any activity you could choose to pursue. Then of course you have the essential part which is trying things on your own and experimenting.

So, which activities are you interested in starting with?

About getting started in general, if you haven't already chosen a distro, you might choose a beginner-friendly one like Linux Mint. It has two variants, but the differences are all in what is pre-installed and/or preconfigured. Within certain limits (which you might never encounter yourself) you can make any distro to look, feel, and behave like any other by adding or removing programs and adjusting the configurations.
Thanks for being so kind and helpful to me.. Actually, I have already installed rhel 6.6 on a laptop and started working on commands and learning it slowly because finding it very hard at first as I just entered into it from the windows world. Apart from that, I am not sure about the activities which I have to perform, I am just practicing commands and reading about them, hopefully I will learn other complex thing as well , as time goes on. Hope things will improve.
 
Old 01-18-2017, 04:27 AM   #9
sunilchand
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rtmistler View Post
Hi Sunil,

Just about the only way to learn Linux "is" to learn it on your own.

I suggest installing Linux, trying out several distributions either via Live boot, Virtual Machine, or installing and working with it. In short ... immersion.

One great book is www.google.com
Another great book is www.wikipedia.org
And as you already know, a final great book is www.linuxquestions.org

The best part is that this is all free!
Yeah, Well said!! Just because of these beautiful resources I am movitatvated to do it own my own.
 
Old 01-18-2017, 04:33 AM   #10
sunilchand
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Registered: Jan 2017
Posts: 12

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by dlb101010 View Post
Welcome sunilchand!

I think you'll enjoy the journey you're about to begin. Linux has been step-wise crafted by some very clever people into a brilliant but accessible technological wonder. And people like us are free to use and tinker and experiment with it, and we're even encouraged to do so.

Getting started with Linux and putting it to good use as your computer's operating system is surprisingly easy. True, there can be glitches when installing Linux and configuring the hardware to work, but those are relatively rare, and people in forums like this one are willing to help if that should happen.

To be sure, Linux has a steep learning curve if you want to understand its many, many intricate facets. And there are challenges and frustrations when putting the power of Linux to use for a specific job, such as running a server, or crunching numbers and organizing them into a database, etc.. But that describes any worthwhile intellectual endeavor, whether taking a calculus course or studying a musical instrument.

If you're an eager learning and like sharpening your mind on a tool that'll be of use and will be available for the rest of your life, Linux won't disappoint.

All the best,
Dave
Thanks Dave!! Yes, I know how hard my journey is going to be! I can sense that it's not going to be an easy ride to play with Linux or other open source distribution. But what can i do? I don't have any choice apart from staying positive and working hard to learn it.
 
Old 01-18-2017, 04:37 AM   #11
Turbocapitalist
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Great. You might look ahead to RHEL 7 or CentOS 7 if you are going that route.

Starting with the "commands" the secret to that is knowing that they are only just programs that you are invoking via a scripting language that also functions as the text interface. That interface is known as the shell and there are several variants, bash is probably what you have but if I were starting out, I'd go with zsh. For example ls is one such program and it even has its own manual page. The manual pages will be overwhelming at first but keep checking them and keep in mind that they are there to be used as a reference for lookup rather than as a tutorial.

For an introduction to the shell, I'd recommend heading to your book shop or library and getting a copy of The Linux Command Line. It's available under a Creative Commons license but the paper copy is handy when starting. In that, I'd suggest going through the entire first section. If you are interested in the advanced capabilities of the shell, then look at chapter 19 plus the fourth section.

Last edited by Turbocapitalist; 01-18-2017 at 05:11 AM. Reason: spelling
 
Old 01-18-2017, 05:09 AM   #12
Jjanel
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Great that you have Linux already! Do you use 'GUI'? (WM/DE)

InMyHumbleOpinion, one only 'needs' <0.1% of the zillion bash syntax details!
OS concepts and all the common utilities/services are even more important.

Are you 'into' Books? I like "Linux Bible" (2015). Another great recent book here

Here's exercises&labs (RHEL6!) Looks GREAT! Give it a look, *seriously*! Also

Try a web-search for like: linux exercises answers labs (Write a book with that title!)

Focus on all the EASY FUN of learning! Best wishes... Let us know.

Last edited by Jjanel; 01-18-2017 at 06:29 AM.
 
Old 01-18-2017, 08:39 AM   #13
m.a.l.'s pa
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I'll offer this recommendation: Learn about man pages. Open up a terminal and run man man.

And, as others have mentioned, expect the process to take some time. I went into it thinking of it like college (after one year of using Linux, I told myself that I'd just completed freshman year).
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 01-18-2017, 09:27 AM   #14
sundialsvcs
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I will also make one more suggestion: VirtualBox !!

This is a free virtual-machine monitor, backed by none other than Oracle Corporation. (The gigantic-database people ...) It runs on anything.

(Don't waste your time with VMWare, which not only is expensive but is a "hobbled horse." You wind up paying a lot more money than you expected to ... to get what VirtualBox provides for nothing.)

Instead of mucking around with your present system (with "dual booting" or what-have-you), install VirtualBox and then install Linux in a virtual-machine environment. Your Linux is now running in a window on the host, and the host machine is undisturbed. What Linux sees as "a hard drive," might really be a file on the host. (Or, it could be a [external ...] hard drive.)

Most web sites today run on virtual machines. Linux has specific support that allows it to recognize that it's running in a VM and to cooperate with the virtual-machine monitor ("hypervisor"). Recent versions of Windows now do the same thing. Virtualization is supported by specific hardware features of the microprocessor. So, there really isn't a performance penalty to be paid.

Now, you can "play with" Linux to your heart's content ... and, in safety. You can "snapshot" the machine, try something ... ... ... ... ... and, if you can't figure out what you did wrong, "restore from the snapshot."

You can, if you like, give the Linux machine read-only or read-write access to portions of your host file environment, which Linux will perceive as network-mounted disks. VirtualBox provides the necessary drivers and does all file access through the host's own filesystem facilities and subject to the host's security controls. (To the host, the virtual machine monitor is simply "an application that is running.")

I routinely use external disks (FireWire or USB-3) to contain virtual machines and their snapshots.

Last edited by sundialsvcs; 01-18-2017 at 09:43 AM.
 
Old 01-18-2017, 09:30 PM   #15
frankbell
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You can find lots of good tutorials (and some really poor ones) on YouTube.
 
  


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