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Old 01-07-2013, 04:40 AM   #16
markush
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Well, it is not true that "the internet is slower on Linux" in general. But there are (possibly) settings within a Windows-network which Linux doesn't recognize.

As someone mentioned above, one thing are the proxy.pac scripts which only the Windowscomputers can handle. On a Linuxmachine you'll have to take a look at the script and find out which proxyserver(s) are used for which protocols. I had for example a situation where only one of the proxyservers allowed access to the internet via FTP protokoll.

So you would have to analyze the proxy.pac scripts which are configured on the Windowsmachines. You can find them when you look in any browser (on Windows). With Firefox in the networksettings -> Proxy, simply open the URL of the proxy.pac script and store it to your computer. Those scripts are relatively easy to understand.

But at first (as suggested by johnsfine) compare the networksettings of the Windowsmachine with those of your Linux machine as there is "ipconfig /all" on Windows and "ifconfig" and the /etc/resolv.conf file on Linux.

If you don't find the cause of your problem, I'd recommend to use tcpdump and check the networktraffic. I would recommend to take a look at the ARP packages. If you've any questions, post the networksettings here and parts of the proxy.pac file.

BTW: you should ask your IT-people if they know that most routers and DNS servers in the internet run with Linux. If they were right, the internet would be slower in general

Markus
 
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Old 01-07-2013, 04:52 AM   #17
austinium
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I faced a similar issue once, extremely slow internet on my computer running Debian, while another computer running Windows 7 worked just fine. I managed to zero it down to a DNS issue with help from the friendly folks over at Debian's IRC Channel. I moved to using Google's Public DNS on my Debian machine and its been working fine eversince.
 
Old 01-07-2013, 05:10 AM   #18
Ser Olmy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markush View Post
As someone mentioned above, one thing are the proxy.pac scripts which only the Windowscomputers can handle.
That is not correct.

The Web Proxy Auto-Discovery Protocol (WPAD) is an old (some would say ancient) CERN standard for web browsers. It is the web browser that fetches and parses the proxy.pac file, not the Operating System.

WPAD works equally well on all operating systems, provided the web browser application supports the standard (which all of them do, AFAIK).
 
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Old 01-07-2013, 05:20 AM   #19
markush
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ser Olmy View Post
That is not correct.

The Web Proxy Auto-Discovery Protocol (WPAD) is an old (some would say ancient) CERN standard for web browsers. It is the web browser that fetches and parses the proxy.pac file, not the Operating System.

WPAD works equally well on all operating systems, provided the web browser application supports the standard (which all of them do, AFAIK).
Well, I'll have to check this. With Linux I have always configured the browser for the proxyservers manually (but in the same way as the proxy-script would have done).

Otherwise, if you want to use the proxy.pac script you'll have to configure this for your browser in the network settings. The Windows-AD-domain clientcomputers get this settings via a policy.

If you want to set the proxyservers as an environmentvariable (in order to make wget working) you can use
Code:
export http_proxy=xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
export ftp_proxy=xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
export https_proxy=xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
where of course you'll have to use the correct IP address of the proxyserver.

@Anisha Kaul: gmail uses https, you should check if you've configured the correct proxy for the https protocol!

Markus
 
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Old 01-11-2013, 02:15 AM   #20
TheIndependentAquarius
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I am thankful to all the people here who have bothered to help.
I will now summarize the questions you asked me and try to get
their answers from the IT people (not sure if they'll be cooperative?)
, or even myself.

Will follow up with the information some time later.
 
Old 01-11-2013, 09:11 AM   #21
johnsfine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
I will now summarize the questions you asked me and try to get
their answers from the IT people (not sure if they'll be cooperative?)
, or even myself.
What I asked can be checked yourself easily. The same is probably true of some of what others asked.

I think it is better to have more information before making an IT request and to do what you can yourself before making a request.

If you ask a question that you could have checked yourself, they may give the answer which would mean no additional work for them, rather than checking for the correct answer. If you later check it yourself and discover they gave you a wrong answer, they are more likely to be defensive and uncooperative.
 
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Old 01-11-2013, 10:19 AM   #22
TheIndependentAquarius
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Indeed, I will try to find out the answers myself first of all.
Thanks for following up.
 
Old 01-11-2013, 10:44 AM   #23
theNbomr
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I find that Mozilla browsers (I used mostly Seamonkey, Firefox sometimes) are possibly the worst Linux applications I have ever used. I have witnessed your symptoms countless times, along with other significant misbehaviors including spontaneous crashes, incorrect rendering of web pages, failing to launch plug-ins correctly, general unresponsiveness, and memory hogging. I assume it originates with some plug-in(s) that I use. I've pretty much switched to Chrome and the problem has mostly gone away. Is is possible that this is the entire basis for your problem?

Other networking and networking applications that I commonly use have no problem in Linux & I use and write Linux networking applications occupationally.

--- rod.
 
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Old 01-11-2013, 07:40 PM   #24
tailinlinux
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Did you try to check your network adapter specifications. Or try to
clear all browser data's.
 
Old 01-11-2013, 09:38 PM   #25
TheIndependentAquarius
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theNbomr View Post
Is is possible that this is the entire basis for your problem?
This time I'll switch to Chrome and see if that helps. Thanks.

I think this kind of question can be used by some interviewer
to judge the problem solving skills of the interviewee!
The answers given here seem to be quite helpful.
 
Old 01-11-2013, 10:56 PM   #26
jefro
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What was said was a proxy pac may have a statement in it that authenticates against some other rule. Almost any modern linux/browser can run .pac files or wpad. One may not be able to get any other network access to work but most browers made in the last 20 years would connect. No linux has ever fixed the global proxy pac for all tools.

proxy.pac files are not extinct and they still work. Very little to be gained with wpad.

If one can get access to the pac file one can see what is going on. Not all users can view a good file is they can't authenticate to the proxy url.
 
Old 01-14-2013, 12:33 AM   #27
sag47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ser Olmy View Post
That is not correct.

The Web Proxy Auto-Discovery Protocol (WPAD) is an old (some would say ancient) CERN standard for web browsers. It is the web browser that fetches and parses the proxy.pac file, not the Operating System.

WPAD works equally well on all operating systems, provided the web browser application supports the standard (which all of them do, AFAIK).
While I agree that Linux and its browsers can handle obtaining the WPAD file (DHCP or DNS) there is always a possibility that the company relies on obtaining the WPAD file using DNS which requires the user to be added to the domain on a Windows computer. In the case of DNS on Linux, /etc/resolv.conf would need to be correctly configured so that the domain searched is the proper path where the WPAD file would be expected to be found. If DNS isn't correctly set up, which it rarely is automatically when mixing Linux with a Windows environment, then it is possible that the WPAD file can't be found due to the misconfiguration of /etc/resolv.conf. I just don't want the point of a WPAD being the problem to be ruled out because it's still a possibility. Of course, asking if the company uses a WPAD for their internet would be a useful question to ask IT if all else appears to be failing. Once they provide you with a URL one could then manually configure the browser or fix the DNS settings in /etc/resolv.conf.

SAM

Last edited by sag47; 01-14-2013 at 12:40 AM.
 
Old 01-14-2013, 02:08 AM   #28
haertig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btmiller View Post
...it sounds to me like your IT people are just trying to avoid having to do work to figure out what is wrong.
If your company hires IT people to support Windows computers, trust me, you don't want those same people trying to support your Linux system. If you get anything out of them at all other than delaying and buck-passing, it will probably be wrong. From your description, it sounds like your company is expecting employees to use Windows desktops. That is not unreasonable - it gets expensive to hire qualified people if employees just run anything they choose and expect IT to come and support whatever they have installed.

Chances are, your IT department is composed of engineers, and a HelpDesk. The HelpDesk folks might know a little bit about Windows and a lot about reading aloud pre-written conversation scripts. And anything beyond the "standard corporate load" on your Windows computer is probably alien to them as well. If you know any of the engineering folks, they probably know Linux inside and out and would be a good resource (but this depends on the size of your company and the OS mindset of management). If your company is small, the entire IT department may be nothing more than a HelpDesk. Which is fine, if that's all your company requires. Bottom line - how much help you can get from IT for a Linux issue will vary wildly from company to company (and I doubt you are having a Linux issue per se, probably DNS or one of the other things already mentioned here). If you are the lone wolf using a Linux desktop within your company, it's fairly certain that you will get much better support here at LQ.org than from your IT organization (excepting the engineers, at some companies).
 
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Old 01-14-2013, 01:57 PM   #29
rtmistler
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Did you tell them in advance that your computer was Linux? Likely though a first question was "what system?" meaning what your hostname was, and so forth and it's not in their database because it's not a supported system.

I think it really depends what you're trying to do with it and it depends on how their network is configured. One thing to try is to get the full mapping of gateways and name servers by looking at the detailed Windows network interface information from a Windows system. I don't think WINS servers are relevant to Linux at all, but knowing the address of the gateway and DNS will go a long way to avoiding problems.

As others have suggested, finding out if the slowdown problems are more related to corporate wide events versus just at your Linux system will help.

I'm in a small company so our IT is outsourced to the service provider, simple DHCP where DNS is set up by that, but it works for Windows, Linux, or any other device that needs network presence. In short, Linux is no worse or better than Windows for network throughput performance, it's the programs that affect it instead.

Further, if it's email and that email is either personal email or an alternate path to corporate email not intended for on-site use, but instead remote use, that could explain why it works, but doesn't work well. For instance, a lot of companies have Outlook and also support POP, but for remote users. Yes it works internally but it wasn't intended too because everyone physically inside the network is supposed to have Outlook to talk to their servers, not be trying to use POP.
 
Old 01-15-2013, 04:35 AM   #30
AnanthaP
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The basic problem is the off-the-cuff reply given by your service and support team. You can't open the eyes of those microserfs and also don't want to make too many changes. The problem lies only in your client machine (and it's setup). Just go through a neighbour's client machine and note ALL the settings - including any information loaded off the AD and also the browser settings. The aim will be to replicate it in your linux box.

Quote:
This time I'll switch to Chrome and see if that helps. Thanks.
Please give feedback after changing over.
Quote:
I think this kind of question can be used by some interviewer
to judge the problem solving skills of the interviewee!
The answers given here seem to be quite helpful.
I doubt that. More likely one would get into a slanging match.

OK
 
  


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