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Old 07-30-2007, 07:17 AM   #1
vande012
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iso image burn


How do you take a linux iso image and burn it with nero so that it will boot up upon start up. I know there is a way, when i burn it the data goes to the disc but it wont start on boot up even if i tell it to boot from cd rom. I have seen it done taking an iso image and putting it in nero so that it will burn a diff way, or something im not sure can someone help me i hope you guys understand my problem
 
Old 07-30-2007, 07:34 AM   #2
lord-fu
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With Nero you have to select the option of "burn Image to disk".
 
Old 07-30-2007, 07:44 AM   #3
vande012
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i did this

I did this and it created a .nrg image actually it created an file on the computer with the extension ????.nrg do i burn this file ????.nrg to disc as data or something?
 
Old 07-30-2007, 07:46 AM   #4
b0uncer
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Instead of Nero, just download this simple, little free program called Imgburn which works on Windows and is meant just for that: burn image files onto disks. Handles CD and DVD discs, and can easily even burn (if you need it to..) CD image onto a DVD without complaining (Nero probably won't do this heh). It's usage is as simple as this: start program, click Open, find the ISO, click burn. No need to use that heavy giant Nero to do this simple task.
 
Old 07-30-2007, 01:24 PM   #5
vande012
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this program worked

This program worked but now it has me wondering, how do you get nero to burn an image so it boots off start-up? What does this program do different then just burn the files to the disc ?
 
Old 07-30-2007, 01:25 PM   #6
Nylex
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I don't know what you've done, but I've used the "Burn image" option in Nero without problems :/.
 
Old 07-30-2007, 03:17 PM   #7
masterclassic
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Nero does it by choosing
Files > Burn Image.
You select the ISO file.

But take care: you must select the recording drive, *not the image recorder* in the Ctrl-R option, before the "burn image" command.

Otherwise, I love me too the open source and free solutions
 
Old 07-30-2007, 10:07 PM   #8
decompiled
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If you're burning an ISO file, then the CD should simply boot if:

1) You have a bootable ISO. Are you sure this disk/ISO is bootable (sometimes the second, third, OS disks, etc. are NOT bootable, only the first in the series.)

AND

2) Your system BIOS is set to boot from the CD-ROM before your hard drive. Check this first.

-Matt
 
Old 07-31-2007, 07:26 AM   #9
vande012
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Another question

Just to be specific what does this do different that makes it bootable? Does it put the files on a certain way? Does it put an extra file on the disc that tells DOS to boot off it? Im just wondering what it does different to make it a bootable disc
 
Old 07-31-2007, 08:03 AM   #10
b0uncer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vande012
Just to be specific what does this do different that makes it bootable? Does it put the files on a certain way? Does it put an extra file on the disc that tells DOS to boot off it? Im just wondering what it does different to make it a bootable disc
When an image file is created (say .iso), all the "settings" of the disk-to-be-created are saved to the file: disc label, files and directories to be burned to the disc, bootable flags (is it bootable or not) and so on. This is the idea of having image files: they contain the complete contents of a disc (or other data) stored into a single file. Then, when a program uses that image file to create something out of it (like a cd for example), it reads the contents of the file, including the "settings" like "this is bootable", and obeys them while creating the output (a cd, for example).

If you burn the image file as normal data burn, your recorder just thinks it's a regular file, writes it to a disk (as a single file) and that's it. Instead, to create a bootable disc out of it, you want to have the program open the image file, check it's contents, write the files from the image to the disk and create the disk following the exact way of the image. For this programs have a special way of burning image files; you don't just drag them and burn, but specially tell the program "this is an image file, so treat it as one, and not regular data file".

The difference is that either the program handles the image as data, or it doesn't but instead reads what's inside. Imgburn handles the job nicely because it's created specifically for that. Nero is (tried to be) created for doing pretty much anything you can do with DVDs or CDs; normally people burn data or audio, and that's the basic functionality of it. When you want Nero to handle something as an image and not data, you'll have to use the menu option for that, to distinct the .iso file from normal data.

If you now think "why can't it do that when I double-click on the image file", the answer is this: some might want to burn the image file as data. For example if they had images of smaller mediums, they maybe wanted to burn several of those images onto one large media for something. They could later just mount the images on-the-fly without burning them, or something, but the important part is they wouldn't then want any of the images to be burned as images (it could make the disk bootable, it spreaded the files from inside the image file onto the disk forming a chaos, maybe overwriting files if every one of the images were "exploded"...). They just maybe wanted to have several image files on the medium. That's why images are not automatically handled as images, but the user is left with an option to burn them as images, effectively "extracting the contents" rather than burning the single file.

In addition to burning, you can transfer the whole image file where ever you want, and mount it (without burning it), to see it's contents. On Linux this happens like this:
Code:
mkdir /mount/place
mount -o loop /path/to/image.img /mount/place
after which the contents of the image file were visible in /mount/place. Works just like a cdrom, except that you need the option "loop" and use the image file as the "device". On Windows you usually need somekind of extra software that creates a "virtual drive" through which you access the image file.

Image files are also a great way of copying stuff; dd is handy tool in this. For example to create an image out of your USB disk (/dev/sda1) you could
Code:
dd if=/dev/sda1 of=/home/me/usbdisk.img
and then live your life and one day copy the image's contents back to the disk:
Code:
dd if=/home/me/usbdisk.img of=/dev/sda1
The operation is done to the (umounted) device (file). You can do this with CDs and pretty much anything too. Or copy directly from a stick (sda1) to another (sdb1):
Code:
dd if=/dev/sda1 of=/dev/sdb1
Note that when doing this, the target device must be exactly as big (or bigger than) as the image file is (or the device it was created out of). In case the target is smaller, it doesn't work, and if it's larger, the rest of the space is left unused (which usually means you can't use it before formatting and partitioning).

That went a little over this thread's topic..but I hope it helps. Image files are like archives, except that extra information can be stored in them, such as bootable flags etc. It is then the responsability of a program that handles the image file to acknowledge the "extra information" and deal with it.
 
Old 07-31-2007, 08:27 AM   #11
michaelk
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A bootable CD does have some special boot code. There are two methods for booting a CD. The 1st is disk emulation where the computer thinks the CD is a floppy or hard drive and the second is no emulation. Check out isolinux or syslinux for more information on a CD bootloader.

The ISO image is a byte for byte copy of the CD. If the bootloader code was added during the process of creating the CD then it will be bootable. If you do not select "burn from image" then Nero will just create a CD with just one file (i.e. the iso image) instead of many files and directories. One command line tool that creates a filesystem image for burning to a CD is called mkisofs.

BTW a data CD filesystem is known as iso9660, ISO stands for International Organization for Standardization and 9660 is the standard that provides the information on how to create a data CD. The extension to the standard to create a bootable CD is called El Torito.
 
Old 07-31-2007, 10:46 AM   #12
vande012
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Bootloader code

Ok so in order to be bootable the bootloader code needs to be edited or added? Also can i manually add the bootloader code if thats te case. Its just so many programs take care of the real brain work thats needs to be done so often now and days i want to know whats really going on behind the scenes

Thank you everyone for replying by the way i guess its true "The only dumb questions are the ones never asked"
 
  


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