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Old 07-01-2012, 07:25 AM   #1
Serph
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is it possible to have a debian squeeze ISO already with a kernel 3.x.x?


how easy is it?
i have an ISO (dvd image) of debian squeezy, but it does not come with the latest stable kernel version 3.4.4
is it possible to delete de kernel 2.6 and then add the kernel 3.4.4 on the ISO?
 
Old 07-01-2012, 12:05 PM   #2
towheedm
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Read this:http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian/README.CD-manufacture

Then install the debian-cd package and build you customized cd.

Good luck.
 
Old 07-09-2012, 07:50 AM   #3
Serph
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i recently learned how to add/remove repositories on the source.list
still learning how to install programs, i mean packages, and unistall then

i cant solve this by myself
can someone here tell me what to do from now on?

http://packages.debian.org/squeeze/debian-cd
 
Old 07-09-2012, 08:11 AM   #4
TobiSGD
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The first question would be: Why do you want to replace your kernel.
The second question would be: Why do you want to have a custom install CD and don't just install a newer kernel?
 
Old 07-09-2012, 09:12 AM   #5
Serph
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well, to have a system up-to-date? i believe a newer kernel will recognize newer hardware, will have a better interaction between soft. and hard.

if we want to have a newer kernel, dont we have to compile it? what if i have to make this compilation on 50 pcs? all diferent form each other (the pcs)?

im new to this, and i thought it wouldn't hurt to have a newer kernel on an iso...
 
Old 07-09-2012, 09:20 AM   #6
TobiSGD
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Compiling a newer kernel on Debian of course will work, but kind of defeats the purpose of using Debian Stable. But of course you also can simply use the newer kernel from the backports repository.
 
Old 07-09-2012, 09:38 AM   #7
the trooper
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You could try these unofficial debian iso's here:

http://kmuto.jp/debian/d-i/

Never tried them personally,but they might be what you are looking for.
 
Old 07-09-2012, 10:20 PM   #8
towheedm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serph View Post
well, to have a system up-to-date? i believe a newer kernel will recognize newer hardware, will have a better interaction between soft. and hard.
Of course there are several ways to keep your system up to date. The recommended way of course would be to install the updates from the distros official repositories. At least with Debian, if the Squeeze repos does not have the software/version that you want, then as mentioned, you can always check the backports repository and install from there. Failing the above two recommended methods, your other choice would be to build/install from source. That is, you download the source code of the latest version (or the version you are interested in), compile and install it. This may necessitate that you build several other dependencies first. This method has the greatest possibility of breakage but does provide a excellent learning experience. As I have mentioned several times, when I first started using Squeeze just over a year ago, I did successfully build/install the latest versions of Banshee, Cairo-Dock and Compiz from source without any issues.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Serph View Post
if we want to have a newer kernel, dont we have to compile it?
Of course if you want the latest kernel you will have to build from source.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Serph View Post
what if i have to make this compilation on 50 pcs? all diferent form each other (the pcs)?
To begin with, if you are going to do this in a production environment, you will want to build the kernel for a few different architectures, then test and correct any build errors first before deploying the new kernel on all of the machines. I have not done it, but I believe yo can cross-compile the kernel for different architectures.

If this is in fact a production environment, then you will have hopefully set up a local Debian repository. A nice 'feature' of the kernel make system, is that it allows you create Debian packages of the new kernel off the bat. No need for kbuild and the sort. The newly built packages can then be deposited into your local repository and each machine updated with the newly built kernel(s).

Even if you don't have a local repository setup, you can install the new kernel(s) on each machine with dpkg.
 
Old 07-09-2012, 11:16 PM   #9
Timothy Miller
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
The first question would be: Why do you want to replace your kernel.
The second question would be: Why do you want to have a custom install CD and don't just install a newer kernel?
As to the first question, I actually JUST had this issue the other day. I used my Debian 6.04 (3 maybe,not sure) install USB to install my brand new pc. Upon booting, I found I would get 1-3 minutes of network connectivity before it would simply stop accessing the network. It would still SHOW a connection, but no amount of waiting, restarting networking, disconnecting/reconnecting, physically disconnecting/reconnecting, ifdown/ifup's would allow me access to the network again without a reboot. It was bad enough that I couldn't even complete an apt-get update successfully sometimes if I changed sources to try to get a newer kernel. After 4 hours I simply gave up and downloaded the 7.0alpha1 installer on another computer and installed. The newer kernel has MUCH better support for my network card, and it hasn't given me 1 issue since then.
 
Old 07-09-2012, 11:22 PM   #10
TobiSGD
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You could just have used a full install CD and install a newer kernel afterwards. This way you would still run Debian Stable, not an alpha version (Debian's alphas are pretty stable, but nonetheless I wouldn't put them on a production system).
 
Old 07-09-2012, 11:25 PM   #11
Timothy Miller
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That is what I did. I couldn't get a stable enough network connection with the installed kernel to install ANYTHING after booting it. As in, I couldn't even get it to stay connected long enough to do an "apt-get update", much less install a new kernel.

I hadn't intended to keep it with Squeeze anyway, while it's fine for servers, it's IMO far too moldy for daily use on anything that is anywhere near slightly modern. I had only kept the 6.x install usb because it was the KDE spin, which they don't offer for the alpha iso's, and I DESPISE Gnome.

Last edited by Timothy Miller; 07-09-2012 at 11:27 PM.
 
  


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