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-   -   Installing packages/using './configure' Please help I am confused... (https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/installing-packages-using-configure-please-help-i-am-confused-4175620403/)

LouCFur 12-27-2017 04:32 PM

Installing packages/using './configure' Please help I am confused...
 
Hello all,

I am using Slackware 14.2 and I am trying to take a tarball and make a package that can be installed. I am trying to take 'tor-browser-linux64-7.0.11_en-US.tar.xz' and install it. I was able to extract all the files into one directory called 'tor-browser_en-US'.

Here's where I have a problem, most of the guides for installing new packages say that you should run (as root, once you're in the directory) './configure' then 'make, then 'make install'.

Well, this is where it gets frustrating... when I go to the 'tor-browser_en-US' directory and run ./configure, I get the message 'bash: ./configure: No such file or directory'

I just don't understand how to do this... Can anyone please offer some help, I'm stuck

-L

TheEzekielProject 12-27-2017 04:43 PM

You don't need to install Tor in the traditional sense! In the directory tor-browser_en-US you should have a start-tor-browser.desktop file. Just run that!
Code:

./start-tor-browser.desktop

Ztcoracat 12-27-2017 04:47 PM

Try typing in the entire path to the tor browser.

For example let's say I have the tor-browser_en-US in my Downloads directory. I would cd to the directory that the browser is in.

Code:

cd /home/username/Downloads/tor-browser_en-us/
Than type ls and the konsole should return all of the files in the tor-browser's folder.
Than type ./configure.

-:::-Once you un-tarred the tor browser it should of placed a folder in the directory that you downloaded it to. Make sure your in that directory before typing ./configure.-:::-

LouCFur 12-28-2017 11:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheEzekielProject (Post 5798552)
You don't need to install Tor in the traditional sense! In the directory tor-browser_en-US you should have a start-tor-browser.desktop file. Just run that!
Code:

./start-tor-browser.desktop

Thank you, that did it

-L

TheEzekielProject 12-28-2017 11:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LouCFur (Post 5798858)
Thank you, that did it

-L


Awesome! Enjoy!

Ztcoracat 12-28-2017 12:30 PM

Don't forget to mark your thread Solved.

sundialsvcs 12-28-2017 12:48 PM

Also, let me add a few unrelated comments for the curious ... "what does ./configure really do?"

(P.S. I'm not quite sure why the OP got "no such file or directory." The nomenclature "./" simply means, "in the current directory.")

The configure-file is generated by the autoconf system, which is designed to simplify the process of configuring an application – that is going to be compiled or built "from source" – enabling the process to be customized whatever environment in which it finds itself situated.

First, the application developer uses "autoconf" to create the "configure" script, which is shipped along with the rest of the application source.

When you execute the configure script, a series of tests as specified by the application developer will be performed on your system, resulting in the creation of a custom Makefile which drives the subsequent make command.

Finally, when you then execute "make," the customized build-process thus created is carried out.

Q.E.D.

Ztcoracat 12-28-2017 01:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sundialsvcs (Post 5798891)
Also, let me add a few unrelated comments for the curious ... "what does ./configure really do?"

(P.S. I'm not quite sure why the OP got "no such file or directory." The nomenclature "./" simply means, "in the current directory.")

The configure-file is generated by the autoconf system, which is designed to simplify the process of configuring an application that is going to be compiled or built "from source" enabling the process to be customized whatever environment in which it finds itself situated.

First, the application developer uses "autoconf" to create the "configure" script, which is shipped along with the rest of the application source.

When you execute the configure script, a series of tests as specified by the application developer will be performed on your system, resulting in the creation of a custom Makefile which drives the subsequent make command.

Finally, when you then execute "make," the customized build-process thus created is carried out.

Q.E.D.

Thanks for the details:-


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