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Old 08-06-2013, 11:15 AM   #1
bigrockcandymtn
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I ned to buy a fedoria 19 iso


I am not new to linux, however I have been away for a long while. I now live in the mountians and have only 3G conection. Where can I buy a fedoria 19 iso? cheep lol
 
Old 08-06-2013, 11:22 AM   #2
MCMLXXIII
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https://www.osdisc.com/products/linux/fedora
 
Old 08-06-2013, 01:07 PM   #3
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigrockcandymtn View Post
I am not new to linux, however I have been away for a long while. I now live in the mountians and have only 3G conection. Where can I buy a fedoria 19 iso? cheep lol
One suggestion would be downloading the ISO at your local library for free. You can bring your laptop and connect to WiFi, or download it onto your own thumb drive on one of their computers.

I know the libraries around here have VERY fast connections, and an ISO image won't take too long to download.
 
Old 08-06-2013, 05:56 PM   #4
jpollard
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Well... one of the problems with Fedora is that the iso download doesn't necessarily include everything anymore. Not even the DVD iso. A complete Fedora 19 will not fit on a DVD anymore. Even when you install, there are still a TON of updates that have to be applied after that.

Be sure you identify the iso containing the software you want.
 
Old 08-06-2013, 06:21 PM   #5
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpollard View Post
Well... one of the problems with Fedora is that the iso download doesn't necessarily include everything anymore. Not even the DVD iso. A complete Fedora 19 will not fit on a DVD anymore. Even when you install, there are still a TON of updates that have to be applied after that.

Be sure you identify the iso containing the software you want.
Good point...and another good reason to do it at the library. Download/burn the network installation image to a USB drive and reboot. Get the latest versions of everything right then.
 
Old 08-06-2013, 06:34 PM   #6
jpollard
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TB0ne View Post
Good point...and another good reason to do it at the library. Download/burn the network installation image to a USB drive and reboot. Get the latest versions of everything right then.
Calls for doing the installation at the library
 
Old 08-06-2013, 06:40 PM   #7
sycamorex
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One more thing to consider is that Fedora is a distro with a very short life cycle. After half a year or so without massive upgrades your system will be out of date. Why don't you go for one of the long term support distros that will keep pushing much fewer (but more critical) updates over a longer period of time?
 
Old 08-06-2013, 10:40 PM   #8
Ztcoracat
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Hi everyone

About 3 to four months ago I did a fresh install of Fedora 18 XFCE x86_64 bit-
Here it is about the same amount of time and I just downloaded a Live iso of Fedora 19-
Code:
Fedora-Live_XFCE-x86_64-19-1.iso
I'm not complaining just explaining so bigrockcandymtn can see what I am talking about.

jpollard:
You are so right! After I complete a fresh install of Fedora I find myself waiting for an exceedly long update to complete.
And along with having to go and get flash and install that so my video's work. VLC, rpm-fusion and so on.
Various tweaking to the applications menu icon's, the clock and etc.

sycamorex:
I agree with you. A short life cycle indeed.
CentOS could be another consideration; you agree?

Fedora does not work right out of the box because Fedora is the R&D testbed for Red Hat.

Aside from that Fedora is cutting edge and a lot of folks like it!



Flash:
http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Flash
Download iso-
http://fedoraproject.org/en/get-fedora-options#desktops
https://fedoraproject.org/en/verify
http://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/index.html
 
Old 08-06-2013, 11:41 PM   #9
lleb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sycamorex View Post
One more thing to consider is that Fedora is a distro with a very short life cycle. After half a year or so without massive upgrades your system will be out of date. Why don't you go for one of the long term support distros that will keep pushing much fewer (but more critical) updates over a longer period of time?
you must be thinking about Ubuntu with the 9mo life cycle. Fedora has a 18mo life cycle and they support up to 2 versions back. As 19 just went live a month ago or so that means that Fedora 17 is the oldest vs that is still getting updates. F17 went live July of 2012 and will remain supported until Fedora 20 goes live.

With the new FedUp project it is much simpler and easier to update then ever before. A trip to the library, as suggested above, will allow for the hour or so update that will be required. hour or so depending on the bandwidth at his local library.

also keep in mind that Fedora 16 went live in 2011. That is the version of Fedora that is no longer supported with updates, thus the 18mo supported life cycle of Fedora.
 
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Old 08-07-2013, 01:49 AM   #10
sycamorex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lleb View Post
you must be thinking about Ubuntu with the 9mo life cycle. Fedora has a 18mo life cycle and they support up to 2 versions back. As 19 just went live a month ago or so that means that Fedora 17 is the oldest vs that is still getting updates. F17 went live July of 2012 and will remain supported until Fedora 20 goes live.

With the new FedUp project it is much simpler and easier to update then ever before. A trip to the library, as suggested above, will allow for the hour or so update that will be required. hour or so depending on the bandwidth at his local library.

also keep in mind that Fedora 16 went live in 2011. That is the version of Fedora that is no longer supported with updates, thus the 18mo supported life cycle of Fedora.

Code:
The Fedora Project releases a new version of Fedora approximately every 6 months and provides updated packages (maintenance) to these releases for approximately 13 months.
https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Fedor...e?rd=LifeCycle

Regardless if that's 6, 13 or 18 months, a cutting-edge distro with constant updates that are likely to break things with a limited access to the internet is not my idea of good Linux experience.
 
Old 08-07-2013, 03:00 AM   #11
AwesomeMachine
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Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by lleb View Post
With the new FedUp project it is much simpler and easier to update then ever before. A trip to the library, as suggested above, will allow for the hour or so update that will be required. hour or so depending on the bandwidth at his local library.
The idea of public library Internet access is to prevent anonymous users from doing anything but browsing the web. Hasn't anyone noticed that it is nearly impossible to legally make electronic communication anonymous in the USA?

For that reason and others, libraries, in my experience, do not allow anything to be inserted into the computer. Use of email on library computers is also restricted, because of the potential abuses of anonymous activity requiring the ability to communicate by email.

Libraries are not wifi hotspots. A public library may provide access to certain online resources, but not uncensored, interactive, anonymous Internet access.

If I'm wrong, please let me know. But I use public library resources, and my experience is you can't do anything with a library PC but browse the web and print, for a fee.

I mean, you can download stuff, but then you have to just leave it, because users are not permitted to insert disks or drives into the library's machines.
 
Old 08-07-2013, 03:59 AM   #12
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Hi I got fedora 18 on a cover magazine dvd.

"Linux User&Developer, Issue 123"

www.linuxuser.co.uk

Maybe you can source a copy through the news agent?
Cheapest option.

I aggree with lleb's post about life cycles.

I hope this helps.

By the way, I have had previous experience with limited bandwidth.
My experience is with Mageia/Mandriva/Mandrake rpm (RedHat Package Manager)file systems.

My best effort was to save every package downloaded by the system and create a local rpm database.

If that occurs to you , let me know here.

Regards Glenn

Last edited by GlennsPref; 08-07-2013 at 04:04 AM.
 
Old 08-07-2013, 04:10 AM   #13
GlennsPref
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I should add, Fedora18 worked out of the box from this mag cd, no downloads required to run(?).

It's stable!
 
Old 08-07-2013, 05:43 AM   #14
EDDY1
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If you're using laptop you can go to almost any local coffee shop which has free wifi & download
 
Old 08-07-2013, 09:30 AM   #15
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AwesomeMachine View Post
The idea of public library Internet access is to prevent anonymous users from doing anything but browsing the web. Hasn't anyone noticed that it is nearly impossible to legally make electronic communication anonymous in the USA?

For that reason and others, libraries, in my experience, do not allow anything to be inserted into the computer. Use of email on library computers is also restricted, because of the potential abuses of anonymous activity requiring the ability to communicate by email. Libraries are not wifi hotspots. A public library may provide access to certain online resources, but not uncensored, interactive, anonymous Internet access.

If I'm wrong, please let me know. But I use public library resources, and my experience is you can't do anything with a library PC but browse the web and print, for a fee.

I mean, you can download stuff, but then you have to just leave it, because users are not permitted to insert disks or drives into the library's machines.
Don't know about where you live, but all Birmingham public libraries have free WiFi, and you can download whatever you'd like. You can't save it to their hard drive, though, but you CAN put in USB sticks, providing having them virus-scanned upon insertion isn't a problem.

I can only go by the libraries I've been in.
 
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