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Old 01-10-2013, 07:48 PM   #16
rilesac
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I'm using Linux Mint 14 Nadia, I think is based on ubuntu.

Which one better or no one is better, just different?
 
Old 01-10-2013, 08:07 PM   #17
m.a.l.'s pa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rilesac View Post
I'm using Linux Mint 14 Nadia, I think is based on ubuntu.

Which one better or no one is better, just different?
It's a matter of opinion. I spent some years running both Mint and Ubuntu, side-by-side, but now I prefer to run Ubuntu and not Mint. The next guy will prefer Mint. Just because someone else thinks one is better than the other doesn't mean you would feel the same way.
 
Old 01-10-2013, 08:29 PM   #18
haertig
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For my servers (both at home and at work), that have to be rock solid stable and just work, work, work, I use either Slackware or Debian. For my desktop, just surfing the web, reading emails, and otherwise playing around, I am currently running LinuxMint 13 Xfce.

Unlike Windows, where you turn your security over to some unknown programmer writing some application that you then pay for, in Linux YOU are the security. A basic install of any Linux distro will be much more secure than Windows could ever be, right out of the box (except Linux doesn't usually come in a box). But with knowledge you can enhance that even further. But it requires you to know something about security yourself, rather than trusting that unknown programmer who now has your money.

Programming languages? I dare say ANY language is supported on Linux. You can type any code you want, in any language, using vi or emacs. If you are looking for a "development environment", something that holds your hand through all the steps of writing, compiling, linking, debugging, running executables, etc. - I don't know about that. I do everything from the commandline using standard software (vi, make, etc.) myself.

If you really want to learn Linux, and not be a slave to some specific distro of Linux, some GUI, or some desktop environment, go for Slackware. If you are good enough to run a Slackware system at the guru level, then you are at the top of the heap of Linux users. People will seek you out for your knowledge, no matter what distro their question pertains to. Actually, "Linux From Scratch" users are probably at the top of the heap too, but Linux From Scratch is not really a distro.

Last edited by haertig; 01-10-2013 at 08:33 PM.
 
Old 01-10-2013, 08:40 PM   #19
rilesac
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Is Linux Mint 14 Nadia, I think is based in Ubuntu.

Is that good, bad or just different?
 
Old 01-10-2013, 08:40 PM   #20
m.a.l.'s pa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haertig View Post
If you really want to learn Linux, and not be a slave to some specific distro of Linux, some GUI, or some desktop environment, go for Slackware. If you are good enough to run a Slackware system at the guru level, then you are at the top of the heap of Linux users. People will seek you out for your knowledge, no matter what distro their question pertains to.
Or if you don't want to go that route, you can always multi-boot various distros. Then, you certainly won't be "a slave to some specific distro of Linux," and you'll learn quite a few things, too (although you still might not learn as much as you would by becoming a Slackware guru!).
 
Old 01-10-2013, 09:36 PM   #21
m.a.l.'s pa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rilesac View Post
Is Linux Mint 14 Nadia, I think is based in Ubuntu.

Is that good, bad or just different?
Hoo, boy. Can't wait to see some of the replies to that one!

I'd say it can be both good and bad, I guess. Seems that there are benefits and there are drawbacks.

One cool thing, for me, was that most of the time I could refer to Ubuntu's documentation when I ran into an issue with Mint. But a lot of times Debian's documentation is excellent for Ubuntu, too!
 
Old 01-10-2013, 11:20 PM   #22
jmc1987
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Based on their website performace wise Linux Mint LDE is better but for easier usablility Linux Nadia would be your pick.

They state that Mint LDE will have some rough edges that you will need to smooth out. If you ever used debian on a install well thats the basics of debian. Installing it and clean it up. I can't say for first person experience because I haven't tried LDE yet but I will soon.
 
Old 01-11-2013, 04:03 PM   #23
rilesac
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Thanks!

Last edited by rilesac; 01-11-2013 at 07:34 PM.
 
Old 01-11-2013, 07:40 PM   #24
rilesac
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LOL I just realize my answers was posted in the second page LOL hahaah sorry.

Thanks about the answers.

What you guys mean with being an slave of a linux distro?
And why if I learn slackware is like different from the other specific distros?

Thanks again (:
 
Old 01-11-2013, 08:09 PM   #25
haertig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rilesac View Post
What you guys mean with being an slave of a linux distro?
And why if I learn slackware is like different from the other specific distros?
Specific distros, and specific desktop environments (Gnome, KDE, etc.) may each have their own little app to do things. For example, RedHat uses RPM for package management. Debian uses APT. And even within, say, a package management system like APT, you really are using dpkg. Possibly through apt-get, possibly through synaptic, possibly through some other front end (like you find on LinuxMint - but I forget what they call their package manager - "Software Center" or something non-descript like that). But these all boil down to frontends for apt and/or dpkg. So when you learn the lower level stuff, you do not "become a slave" to something like LinuxMint's custom software manager. You can learn and use apt/dpkg and be distro-independent, at least among the Debian-based distros.

Other things like user management - adding a new user, changing their password, etc. - you will find little distro-specific tools to do that. Or you can just learn how to use "useradd" which all those little distro-specific apps operate as a front-end for.

I recommended Slackware because it is known NOT to hold your hand. And you don't want your hand held if you really want to learn Linux. Many of the hand-holding distros try to make Linux more like Windows, doing everything from a GUI. With Slackware you don't always have those little GUI apps to front-end basic things like user management. You can add them, but "the Slackware way" is more to know your system from the low level. Many people call Slackware an "advanced user distro". Not really, but it is truthful to say that "Slackware doesn't hold your hand". On the other hand, if you are good with Slackware and know it in-and-out, you are indeed an advanced user. If you know Slackware at this level, you can walk up to any distro and be 100% productive with it right from the start. The opposite is not necessarily true though. A good Ubuntu user is not necessarily going to be able to run a Slackware system at a high level. That's not knocking Ubuntu - I use it myself - but it is definitely an hand-holding distro.

Not everybody needs to, or wants to, attain a high level of Linux expertise though. My parents run Linux and do very well with it. But I put Ubuntu on their computer, not Slackware.

Last edited by haertig; 01-11-2013 at 08:11 PM.
 
Old 01-11-2013, 11:20 PM   #26
m.a.l.'s pa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haertig View Post
Not everybody needs to, or wants to, attain a high level of Linux expertise though.
Very true. But whether you learn to use Slackware, or take a different approach and simply become comfortable with various distros, you end up feeling a certain amount of freedom that you probably won't get by sticking with only Ubuntu or Linux Mint, for example. Perhaps "slave to a distro" isn't the best way to put it, but you might not want to be tied down to any one distro. I like to say, "Be a Linux user, not just a Mint or an Ubuntu (or whatever) user."

Last edited by m.a.l.'s pa; 01-11-2013 at 11:22 PM.
 
Old 01-12-2013, 12:48 AM   #27
TobiSGD
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Just a few clarifications:
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmc1987
Running the system as the root user on a daily bases like a typical windows user will find your self with a very big security whole.
The typical Windows user is not running as root user on a daily basis. Since Windows Vista the default user is unprivileged, with the UAC system acting somewhat similar to sudo on Ubuntu like distros.

Quote:
Originally Posted by haertig
A basic install of any Linux distro will be much more secure than Windows could ever be, right out of the box (except Linux doesn't usually come in a box).
This is simply not true. The default Windows installation comes with the same security system as the default Linux install, file permissions. But the Windows security system is by default much more sophisticated than the standard Linux security system, you need to use applications like AppArmor or SELinux to come to the same level. The problem is that Microsoft has not activated that security system by default and makes it difficult to do that in the consumer versions of Windows.
In short, that Windows can not be as secure as Linux is remnant knowledge from the past that is not true anymore.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rilesac
I'm using Linux Mint 14 Nadia, I think is based on ubuntu.

Which one better or no one is better, just different?
There is no better Linux distribution. Ubuntu can be a good distribution, Debian is a good distribution, both have different aims and handle things differently. Which one suits you more can only be answered by you. If you feel comfortable with the standard Mint installation then there is nothing wrong with that, just use it. Sooner or later you will feel the need to try other distributions anyway, there is no need to rush, there are literally hundreds of distributions just waiting for a test ride. In the first place you should learn the basics of working with a Linux system, then you can judge better what you want from a Linux distribution and what you like in specific distributions.
 
Old 01-12-2013, 03:22 AM   #28
m.a.l.'s pa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
The typical Windows user is not running as root user on a daily basis. Since Windows Vista the default user is unprivileged, with the UAC system acting somewhat similar to sudo on Ubuntu like distros.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
The default Windows installation comes with the same security system as the default Linux install, file permissions. But the Windows security system is by default much more sophisticated than the standard Linux security system, you need to use applications like AppArmor or SELinux to come to the same level. The problem is that Microsoft has not activated that security system by default and makes it difficult to do that in the consumer versions of Windows.
In short, that Windows can not be as secure as Linux is remnant knowledge from the past that is not true anymore.
Wow, I didn't know this. But I haven't used Windows at home since XP.
 
Old 01-12-2013, 06:33 AM   #29
rilesac
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
The default Windows installation comes with the same security system as the default Linux install, file permissions. But the Windows security system is by default much more sophisticated than the standard Linux security system, you need to use applications like AppArmor or SELinux to come to the same level. The problem is that Microsoft has not activated that security system by default and makes it difficult to do that in the consumer versions of Windows.
In short, that Windows can not be as secure as Linux is remnant knowledge from the past that is not true anymore.
wow, I'm amazed to read this, but I have read a lot that linux is more secure than windows, people say it like if it were a fact. So it's completely false?
 
Old 01-12-2013, 07:04 AM   #30
TobiSGD
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Most people compare the experience they had with the Windows versions they have used last before they switched to Linux, like XP or even 98/ME, with modern Linux systems, which is not really a fair comparison. In the hands of someone who is willing to learn how to setup the Windows security system correctly Windows is not less secure than a Linux system in the hands of someone who is willing to do the same with the Linux security systems. I didn't knew that either, but fellow member sundialsvc knows much about Windows security and i learned that from his answers in several threads here.

Nowadays the security of a box is mostly depended on the person administering it. Since this is in most cases the "normal user" Linux is as secure as Windows. Of course it is still the largest aim for crackers and due to its standardized nature somewhat easier compromise, but as you can see with the latest Java debacle, aims have shifted from the OS to other attack vectors, mostly browsers, browser plugins and gullible users.
 
  


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