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Old 09-01-2010, 06:55 AM   #1
DeesSqueeze
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I don't speak Linux . I need the 'For Dummies' version! And I can't find it!


Dear Linux-ites:
I am much older than most of you, so old I have programmed an IBM 50-something using punch cards, and a PSP-8 using little switches. Unfortunately, I forgot everything I learned about programming fifteen seconds after passing the course. And now, when I am desperately trying to escape Bill Gates and The Evil Empire and live in a Linux world, I find I can't even understand the most basic jargon.
Distro? Took a while, gang.
I have crashed one computer, not recently, losing a couple YEARS work in the process, and I am NOT comfortable with command line entries. I have read most of the way through the reviews section, and found the abbreviations, argot, and assumptions totally confusing. And I still have no idea whether there is an answer for this question...
"Is there an iteration of Linux that installs quickly and quietly and automatically, that will run one vital program - Screenwriter 2000 for XP - and do so without any decisions or locations or information that would require me to enter/alter the registry or system information on my computer?"
Laugh at me if you will. How many of you can use a stick shift or control a team of horses hauling a hay wagon uphill?
(I take my triumphs when, and where, I can.)
Thank you in advance...
Roy
 
Old 09-01-2010, 07:03 AM   #2
MTK358
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Quote:
"Is there an iteration of Linux that installs quickly and quietly and automatically, that will run one vital program - Screenwriter 2000 for XP - and do so without any decisions or locations or information that would require me to enter/alter the registry or system information on my computer?"
Use Wine (if it can even run in wine). BTW Linux does not have a "Registry", each program has its own human-editable text config file.
 
Old 09-01-2010, 07:05 AM   #3
AlucardZero
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Looks like Screenwriter 2000 runs, at least, in wine, though it might not all work.

I'd try Ubuntu, install wine (via the Add/Remove Programs GUI, don't worry), then try installing and running your program.
 
Old 09-01-2010, 07:09 AM   #4
repo
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Welcome to LQ

Quote:
"Is there an iteration of Linux that installs quickly and quietly and automatically, that will run one vital program - Screenwriter 2000 for XP - and do so without any decisions or locations or information that would require me to enter/alter the registry or system information on my computer?"
No, since Screenwriter 2000 for XP is a windows program, it will not run on linux, unless you use wine http://www.winehq.org/ or install XP in a virtual machine in linux.
Another option is to look for an alternative in linux.

Quote:
Is there an iteration of Linux that installs quickly and quietly and quietly
Take a look at ubuntu
http://www.ubuntu.com/

Kind regards
 
Old 09-01-2010, 07:23 AM   #5
i92guboj
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeesSqueeze View Post
Dear Linux-ites:
I am much older than most of you, so old I have programmed an IBM 50-something using punch cards, and a PSP-8 using little switches. Unfortunately, I forgot everything I learned about programming fifteen seconds after passing the course. And now, when I am desperately trying to escape Bill Gates and The Evil Empire and live in a Linux world, I find I can't even understand the most basic jargon.
Distro? Took a while, gang.
The first and most important thing you need to understand and learn is that Linux is not Windows. So, forget about any assumption you might have in your mind about how the OS from Redmond/MS works and be prepared to learn.

Ubuntu is the de-facto standard for newcomers. That doesn't mean that it will fit every newcomer. But for the sound of your post, it should fit you. It might also worth to check Fedora or OpenSuSE.

Quote:
I have crashed one computer, not recently, losing a couple YEARS work in the process, and I am NOT comfortable with command line entries.
If in these many decades of computing you haven't yet learned that you must do backups then I think that no OS can protect you from yourself, truly. This has nothing to do with Linux or any other OS.

I can't see either how the command line is a problem for a person who has programmed in the past using punch cards, you shouldn't really be that scared about that. But most modern distros don't ask from you that kind of knowledge. Occasionally, though, you might need to operate on command line to fix some problem, install software or do some administrative tasks.

Quote:
"Is there an iteration of Linux that installs quickly and quietly and automatically,
Most of them will do that. Most mainstream distros do have a graphical installer that will do everything for you. Even setup a dual boot if another OS is found in the hard disk. This is valid for the distros (distrubutions, compilations) I named above.

Quote:
that will run one vital program - Screenwriter 2000 for XP
Just to make this clear, and in case you don't know, in general windows programs will NOT run under Linux, just like games for a playstation won't work on an xbox or a gamecube, or just like programs for Mac will not run on Windows.

Having that in mind, you can try Wine, which is a compatibility layer that aims to run *some* windows programs on Linux, according to the Wine web site that program will work ok, but you can always expect a few glitches here and there, regressions on future versions of wine, etc. etc.

Another option is to use a virtual machine and install Windows inside that VM. There's virtualbox, vmware, qemu, and a few others.

But, truly, you should be looking for a native alternative if there's one. I haven't ever used Screenwriter so I can't make any suggestions on that regard, but you can almost always find native alternatives that will work on Linux without needing any voodoo magic.

Quote:
- and do so without any decisions or locations or information that would require me to enter/alter the registry or system information on my computer?"
There's no registry in Linux. The programs running under wine will write to an emulated registry file that lives inside ~/.wine/ though.

I don't think anyone's going to laugh at you around here, but you need to be prepared to learn. Linux has very little to do with Windows, they are different animals just like being able to handle horses doesn't imply that you are also able to handle whales or elephants.
 
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Old 09-01-2010, 07:30 AM   #6
MTK358
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I'd recommend Linux Mint over Ubuntu. I think it's just nicer and it has proprietary software like Flash and proprietary codecs pre-installed, which you probably want anyway and would be a pain to install manually.

And this is a good read: http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm
 
Old 09-01-2010, 09:14 AM   #7
jdkaye
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Hi DS,
You should bear in mind that most windows programs have linux equivalents that or similar or even superior in functionality. Just a quick browse turned up Celtx which you can check out here. Celtx is free (as in beer and speech) and runs natively on linux. I'm sure there are plenty of other possibilities out there.

As for age, how does 1942 sound? I did my first programming on ticker tape and only later moved to the more advanced punch cards.
Cheers,
jdk
 
Old 09-01-2010, 09:16 AM   #8
onebuck
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Hi,

Welcome to LQ! (2009)

Been lurking quite awhile?

Quote:
Laugh at me if you will. How many of you can use a stick shift or control a team of horses hauling a hay wagon uphill?
(I take my triumphs when, and where, I can.)
Thank you in advance...
Roy
I'm not going to laugh at you! But I can relate to where you are coming from. I can and still do drive a stick and can handle horses either driven or ride. Well, not ride now as the doctors have kept me off for 3 years because of several spinal operations. I'll be back on!

You need to get on! Pick a distribution from Download Linux here on LQ. You can find all kinds of online assistance here on LQ:'Slackware-Links'. More than just Slackware® links! Is a resource that I maintain that has useful links that can help you to learn & discern. You need to start gaining the knowledge to excel your GNU/Linux experience. If you must have Xp then either a Dual boot option or as already suggested then a Virtual Machine. Look at 'The LiveCD List' to test drive a GNU/Linux.

As you can see, I prefer Slackware. You seem to be from my generation or least we probably overlap. I started out with Unit Records and programming in BAL, COBOL, RPG and those same punch cards (circa late 60's). Wired program boards and those damn punch machines. Moved from IBM 1103 & Mod360/20/xx to DEC series but jumped into the micro field early(70/71:4004). So I can relate to the blocks you seem to be having. M$ was just a doorway and not necessarily a good path of introduction for people with a micro-system OS(early 81). Before that I used the Intel 8008 then Intel 808X). Progressed to the Zilog Z-80. Storied past? BTW, I still use M$ but for clients and when I need the work. Does pay for toys!

You will find that most people here on LQ are more than willing to provide aid or assistance to someone who is willing to work to get on board with GNU/Linux. If all you want is to have a working Desktop environment then pick a hold your hand distribution: *buntus, SUSE or the like. If you want to learn GNU/Linux then Slackware would be the way to go. More effort and work on your part but not impossible for old gray matter like ours.

Just a few useful links;
Slackware® Essentials
Slackware® Basics
Linux Documentation Project
Rute Tutorial & Exposition
Linux Command Guide
Bash Reference Manual
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Linux Newbie Admin Guide
LinuxSelfHelp
Getting Started with Linux
Virtualiation- Top 10

The above links and others can be found at 'Slackware-Links'. More than just Slackware® links!
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 09-01-2010, 09:23 AM   #9
BirdRacer
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There is an open source screenplay writing software available for linux on sourceforge called ... wait for it ... "screenplay"

http://screenplay.sourceforge.net/

I don't know if this is what you need, nor anything about it, but something for you to look into.
 
Old 09-01-2010, 09:26 AM   #10
bret381
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It looks like Screenwriter was tested in Wine and for the most part works. However the information is based on an older version of Wine. So It may or may not work.

Supposedly Celtx is a linux native app that does about the same thing. I have not used either program, so I can't say for sure.

Good luck with Linux

Some easy to use distros would be as mentioned earlier, Ubuntu, Mint and to add to the list PCLinuxOS, Mandriva, and OpenSuse. I would stay away from Fedora as this distro is not really geared toward new linux users. Although it's easy to install, it is unstable and is developed to "push the code"...
 
Old 09-01-2010, 10:06 AM   #11
wsteward
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Thumbs up Remember the Commadore 64

I would try the Howtos on HowtoForge. It has very nice tutorials on setup on the "The Perfect Desktop". Go to http://www.howtoforge.com/howtos and search on 'The Perfect Desktop' you can check out all the different step by step setups for most any disto. I am kind of partial to Fedora. I used to be a hard core Windows , remember Windows 3.0??, man but seen the light when I discovered Redhat about 10 years back. Good luck!!
 
Old 09-01-2010, 12:12 PM   #12
myposts
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Here...

wrong post

Last edited by myposts; 09-01-2010 at 12:14 PM.
 
Old 09-01-2010, 12:28 PM   #13
craigevil
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Try Ubuntu
Ubuntu Manual - http://ubuntu-manual.org/
Official Ubuntu Documentation https://help.ubuntu.com/
Switching to Ubuntu from Windows - https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Sw...tu/FromWindows

Some useful docs/sites
The Linux Documentation Project http://www.tldp.org/index.html
Bash Guide for Beginners http://tldp.org/LDP/Bash-Beginners-G...tml/index.html
FTA - Free Technology Academy - http://ftacademy.org/
The Quick Reference Site - http://www.digilife.be/quickreferences/Home.html
Unix Toolbox - http://cb.vu/unixtoolbox.xhtml
Ubuntu:Lucid - http://ubuntuguide.org/wiki/Ubuntu:Lucid
The One Page Linux Manual - http://www.digilife.be/quickreferenc...x%20Manual.pdf
Grokking Debian GNU/Linux -
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...nu-linux-3073/
Ubuntu reference Cheat Sheet - http://files.fosswire.com/2008/04/ubunturef.pdf
 
Old 09-01-2010, 03:20 PM   #14
DeesSqueeze
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Wow! What an outpouring! In a couple of hours, I've gotten access to getting schooled! Thanks so much. I'll be checking links all week. Learning is always fun.
To those who mentioned Celtx, I have tried it. It is a very interesting start. The problem is that I have been using Screenwriter since it was Scriptthing, back in the last century, and it is essentially transparent in every aspect by now.
I appreciate all the comments, now please, let me get all the links followed and read, and hopefully acted on, so that I can come back and be properly grateful.

JDK and onebuck, nice to know that there's people her that know the words to the same songs. Look forward to discussing things, as soon as I adopt the Linux Lifestyle.

Roy
"Jumped to the right. Time warped."
(not mine, but good)
 
Old 09-02-2010, 07:51 AM   #15
onebuck
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Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeesSqueeze View Post
Wow! What an outpouring! In a couple of hours, I've gotten access to getting schooled! Thanks so much. I'll be checking links all week. Learning is always fun.
To those who mentioned Celtx, I have tried it. It is a very interesting start. The problem is that I have been using Screenwriter since it was Scriptthing, back in the last century, and it is essentially transparent in every aspect by now.
I appreciate all the comments, now please, let me get all the links followed and read, and hopefully acted on, so that I can come back and be properly grateful.

JDK and onebuck, nice to know that there's people her that know the words to the same songs. Look forward to discussing things, as soon as I adopt the Linux Lifestyle.

Roy
"Jumped to the right. Time warped."
(not mine, but good)
"Look forward to discussing things, as soon as I adopt the Linux Lifestyle"

Why not not continue? As you have already made the first steps. I'm sure there will be questions to problems that someone here on LQ can aid you during the journey .

I no longer sing that much!

 
  


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