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Old 05-24-2009, 01:47 PM   #1
ConnorMarc
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Registered: May 2009
Location: Atlanta, GA
Distribution: Ubuntu 9.04
Posts: 21

Rep: Reputation: 15
I Don't Know How To Do Basic Stuff w/Linux(Ubuntu 9.04)


I just installed yesterday (cold-turkey from Vista)and spent most of the day after installation trying in vain to get my wireless to work. I ended up running to WalMart at 10:30PM to purchase an ethernet cord. So I'm not worried about wireless connecting for now.

My problem now is that I can't even get the Enhanced Graphics to work, clearly due to Graphic Card issues. So I did some searching and found out that I have to install some new drivers. My particuar driver is ATI Radeon 3100, which I found out from doing a search and running a substititue for Belarc where I saw it in my system info from the output on the HTML page. Phew.

I find out that before I can install this new driver I have uninstall any previous drivers, which I don't even know if or what I have installed already, or pre-installed as the case may be.

Here's what I found out about my minimum system requirements:


Minimum System Requirements

Before attempting to install the ATI Proprietary Linux driver, the following software

must be installed:

XOrg 6.8, 6.9, 7.0, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3 or 7.4

Linux kernel 2.6 or above

glibc version 2.2 or 2.3

POSIX Shared Memory (/dev/shm) support is required for 3D applications



I'm pretty sure my Laptop can handel it, but I don't know what kernel I have, what XOrg I have (if any) what glibc version I have (if any) ...same for POSIX.

Then I found out the system recomendations:


System Recommendations

For best performance and ease of use, ATI recommends the following:

Kernel module build environment

o Kernel source code include either the Kernel Source or Kernel Headers packages

The RPM utility should be installed and configured correctly on your system, if you

intend to install via RPM packages

The following packages must be installed in order for the CatalystTM Linux driver to

install and work properly:

XFree86-Mesa-libGL

libstdc++

libgcc

XFree86-libs

fontconfig

freetype

zlib

gcc



Again...I dunno anything about thtat stuff and what I have from what I don't have.

So I guess I need to be able to know how to look up what I do have, then be able to know how to install them (which I don't) or uninstall them. (same thing) before I can do anything else.

I guess my post seems a bit disjointed, but hopefully somebody can understand and help me make sense of what I need to do, because clearly I need help.

Thanks,
Marc

PS - My Laptop TOSHIBA, Satellite L305D-S5934, AMD Turion X2 (64) Dual-Core Mobile Processor RM-70, ATI Radeon Graphics, 3GB SDRAM, 250GB HDD, Ubuntu 9.04
 
Old 05-24-2009, 02:11 PM   #2
jamescondron
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Woah, you'll give yourself a heart attack with so many questions- lets see if we can help:

1 - I'll take a guess (an informed one) and say you're on 'kernel 2.6 or higher' - open a terminal (Applications -> Accessories -> Terminal) and type in 'uname -r' to get the exact version.

2 - XOrg make 'X' which is (to put it as simply as I can) the windows and GUI in front of you. It is called X because it comes after W, which was the original name for the Windows Manager.

3 - POSIX is the collection of standards for UNIX systems, wikipedia has an informative article on it.

4 - glibc is another question. You may not have it, you see. At the terminal type in
Code:
sudo apt-get install glibc
and it'll update it anyway

5 - The packages listed, most come together under 'build-essential' so install that package (See if you can guess how from the above command)

6 - You say clearly down to graphics cards issues. Why clearly? You need to be more specific if you've taken steps to suss this out


Good luck with linux
 
Old 05-24-2009, 02:26 PM   #3
ConnorMarc
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2009
Location: Atlanta, GA
Distribution: Ubuntu 9.04
Posts: 21

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamescondron View Post
Woah, you'll give yourself a heart attack with so many questions- lets see if we can help:
lol...perhaps ur right.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jamescondron View Post
1 - I'll take a guess (an informed one) and say you're on 'kernel 2.6 or higher' - open a terminal (Applications -> Accessories -> Terminal) and type in 'uname -r' to get the exact version.
I got:
2.6.28-11-generic

Quote:
Originally Posted by jamescondron View Post
2 - XOrg make 'X' which is (to put it as simply as I can) the windows and GUI in front of you. It is called X because it comes after W, which was the original name for the Windows Manager.
It was my undestanding that I have something called GNOME.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jamescondron View Post
3 - POSIX is the collection of standards for UNIX systems, wikipedia has an informative article on it.
OK, sounds like this is a non-issue then.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jamescondron View Post
4 - glibc is another question. You may not have it, you see. At the terminal type in
Code:
sudo apt-get install glibc
and it'll update it anyway
OK, this is what I did and what happened:

marc@Marc-Laptop:~$ sudo apt-get install glibc
[sudo] password for marc:
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree
Reading state information... Done
E: Couldn't find package glibc
marc@Marc-Laptop:~$


Quote:
Originally Posted by jamescondron View Post
5 - The packages listed, most come together under 'build-essential' so install that package (See if you can guess how from the above command)
I'm guessing its "sudo -build-essential?" Also, does it matter where you are as in, which directory you are in? Or can you simply run the Terminal and type if from there? I'm new and I don't want to jack anything up, especially being as how I don't have everything up and running properly as it is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jamescondron View Post
6 - You say clearly down to graphics cards issues. Why clearly? You need to be more specific if you've taken steps to suss this out
Clearly, becuase I'm not aware of any other possibilties. I could be wrong, and probably am, but that was my first guess, based on my ignorance of this system.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jamescondron View Post
Good luck with linux
Thanks for your input, hopefully you and/or others can get me to a base point where I can at least understand what I'm doing/what's going on.
 
Old 05-24-2009, 03:24 PM   #4
archShade
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Registered: Mar 2006
Location: Delft NL
Distribution: Debian; Slackware; windows 7
Posts: 218

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Quote:
I'm guessing its "sudo -build-essential?" Also, does it matter where you are as in, which directory you are in? Or can you simply run the Terminal and type if from there? I'm new and I don't want to jack anything up, especially being as how I don't have everything up and running properly as it is.
To install new aplications from configured repositorys from the terminal you need to do ( this can be done from anywhere as long as you have sudo privileges)

sudo apt-get install package_name

or

sudo aptitude install package_name

(to uninstall apps replace install with remove also availible are other commands such as update)

I use aptitude as it works better at removing orphaned packages.

You can do this under from the desktop using synaptic in System>>Administration>>synaptic

Here you can easily add repositorys by going to settings>repository.

To install the ATI driver you will need the multiverse repository. Then just serch for ATI Xorg drivers. This should set it up for you.

Quote:
It was my undestanding that I have something called GNOME.
GNOME is your desktop and supplys the "look and feel".

X is your windows manager and supplies the functionality.
 
Old 05-24-2009, 03:47 PM   #5
jamescondron
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Registered: Jul 2007
Location: Scunthorpe, UK
Distribution: Ubuntu 8.10; Gentoo; Debian Lenny
Posts: 961

Rep: Reputation: 69
You can run the command in any directory you want, its like being able to install from any directory on winblows- it all goes where it ought to, to fully understand the options, use the command
Code:
man apt-get
man is short for manual- the vast majority of commands and programmes have a man page- if you need to understand how any of them are run, just view the man page for them. There are also other 'apt' based programmes- a hint for you here, something called 'bash-completetion' (Bash is the default shell on ubuntu, so I'm guessing its still that) at the terminal type in 'apt' and hit tab (maybe a couple of times) - it'll try and complete the command for you, so you'll see the full range.

Okay, back on topic- to install this driver, what exactly do you have in front of you?
 
Old 05-24-2009, 04:01 PM   #6
ConnorMarc
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2009
Location: Atlanta, GA
Distribution: Ubuntu 9.04
Posts: 21

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by archShade View Post
To install new aplications from configured repositorys from the terminal you need to do ( this can be done from anywhere as long as you have sudo privileges)

sudo apt-get install package_name

or

sudo aptitude install package_name

(to uninstall apps replace install with remove also availible are other commands such as update)

I use aptitude as it works better at removing orphaned packages.

You can do this under from the desktop using synaptic in System>>Administration>>synaptic

Here you can easily add repositorys by going to settings>repository.

To install the ATI driver you will need the multiverse repository. Then just serch for ATI Xorg drivers. This should set it up for you.



GNOME is your desktop and supplys the "look and feel".

X is your windows manager and supplies the functionality.
Preciate It Arc, however, I'm not certain what you mean by "configured repositorys" is that similar to like SYS files in Windows, as in where things are supposed to be kinda thing?

I now understand the sudo thing and thank you for that explanation. How about stuff I download?

For instance, I figured I'd make myself feel better by trying to do something "easy" by searching for a new theme to download and install, I found a cool theme, but when I clicked and double clicked on it thinking I was installing it, I got code. It seems to be "saved" in a temp directory, because I see "~/cache" or something in the headertitle of the text editing software.

My question is, is there a way to install software with just having the code? How is that done? For instance, take themes...should they all be "saved/stored" in teh same directory? What should their extension be saved as?

Here's the code I'm talking about...


[Desktop Entry]
Name=Black-Diamond (blue glow)
Type=X-GNOME-Metatheme
Comment=

[X-GNOME-Metatheme]
GtkTheme=Black-Diamond
MetacityTheme=Humanoid-OSX-Black
IconTheme=Meliae
GtkColorScheme=fg_color:#e9e9e9e9e9e9,bg_color:#404040404040,text_color:#090909090909,base_color:#e9 e9e9e9e9e9,selected_fg_color:#e9e9e9e9e9e9,selected_bg_color:#34345a5a7575,tooltip_fg_color:#e9e9e9e 9e9e9,tooltip_bg_color:#404040404040
CursorTheme=DMZ-Black
CursorSize=24
NotificationTheme=ubuntu


Also, are "packages" equal to software/programs? If not, what is meant by "packages?"

I undestand these may be very silly and juevenile questions, but I really don't know.

Sincerely,
Marc
 
Old 05-24-2009, 04:01 PM   #7
cynicalpsycho
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Registered: Mar 2009
Location: America
Distribution: Debian/Arch
Posts: 134

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Might i suggest some light reading:
http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz (i'm just kidding, that's a SHOTTA LIT for a linux virgin to cover)....
perhaps you'll wanna start out with this:
http://www.ubuntupocketguide.com/download_main.html
or here to view online:
http://issuu.com/ubuntupocketguide/d...deandreference
Great litte guide to introduce you to linux...
 
Old 05-24-2009, 04:07 PM   #8
ConnorMarc
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2009
Location: Atlanta, GA
Distribution: Ubuntu 9.04
Posts: 21

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamescondron View Post
You can run the command in any directory you want, its like being able to install from any directory on winblows- it all goes where it ought to, to fully understand the options, use the command
Code:
man apt-get
man is short for manual- the vast majority of commands and programmes have a man page- if you need to understand how any of them are run, just view the man page for them. There are also other 'apt' based programmes- a hint for you here, something called 'bash-completetion' (Bash is the default shell on ubuntu, so I'm guessing its still that) at the terminal type in 'apt' and hit tab (maybe a couple of times) - it'll try and complete the command for you, so you'll see the full range.

Okay, back on topic- to install this driver, what exactly do you have in front of you?
Thanks James,

I'll try that man command as soon as I'm finished typing this.

lol @ "winblows." I saw that. I can't wait til I fully agree with you, that'll happen once I actually undestand this stuff I'm sure.

Anyway, so how is this possible? For instance in Windows to run any command that command has to be where you are, unless its a DOS command. like "dir" or something. You know, like if you're in DIRECTORY01 and have an executable called EXE01.exe you have have to be in DIRECTORY01 to run it. So even if you type "EXE01" in DIRECTORY02, nothing will happen because it won't know what you're talking about.

You understand what I'm trying to say/ask?
 
Old 05-24-2009, 04:08 PM   #9
jamescondron
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Registered: Jul 2007
Location: Scunthorpe, UK
Distribution: Ubuntu 8.10; Gentoo; Debian Lenny
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First of all, on ubuntu- packages are usually appended with .deb- these are like Windows Installers. These are stored online in repositories. When you go to install with apt-get/aptitude/synaptic etc., the package is downloaded from the relevant repository and installed.

If you notice on the front of the cache path you gave, you'll see a tilde at the front. This means the directory is in your home directory. This is what My Documents is to windows, really.

If you have the code, thats a complicated (and sometimes discouraged) way to install- you need to compile the source code into a binary file (an executable as it were) and run that. Problem with doing it this way is that you don't know what dependencies you'll be missing.

That code is a config file for a theme. Here is a guide to themes, I have no clue if it is what you need, but its a way of doing it: http://www.associatedcontent.com/art...on_ubuntu.html

EDIT:
Just saw the dos question. On DOS, when you type in a command it first checks a directory (forget what it calls it) usually at c:\windows\system 32\ before looking in the active directory. Same here, there are a few it searches for a command- try this command
Code:
echo $PATH
- those directories are where

Last edited by jamescondron; 05-24-2009 at 04:11 PM. Reason: response to above
 
Old 05-24-2009, 05:18 PM   #10
archShade
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If you want to run a command that is in your current diretory you need to prefix with ./

e.g. to run myprogram in the current directory you would enter ./myprogram.

Slightly off topic but it seemed worth mentioning at this point.
 
Old 05-24-2009, 07:29 PM   #11
ConnorMarc
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2009
Location: Atlanta, GA
Distribution: Ubuntu 9.04
Posts: 21

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by cynicalpsycho View Post
Might i suggest some light reading:
http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz (i'm just kidding, that's a SHOTTA LIT for a linux virgin to cover)....
perhaps you'll wanna start out with this:
http://www.ubuntupocketguide.com/download_main.html
or here to view online:
http://issuu.com/ubuntupocketguide/d...deandreference
Great litte guide to introduce you to linux...
That's a LOT of reading dude, especially for a guy that hates to read.

lol.

Thanks though, I'll try to read it all.
 
Old 05-24-2009, 07:38 PM   #12
jamescondron
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To be honest with you, just playing around and exploring is your best bet to learn; you'll never understand anything purely in theory, practice is better.

Learning the basic commands and stuff is fair enough, but those are just programmes, its better to learn about the system because then you'll have somewhere to apply this basic command knowledge. So long as you can navigate around with the terminal (I'd seriously reccommend the terminal as a way of interacting, its a lot quicker) then you're laughing, anything else you can learn as and when you need it, google is a big help

Get to understand how Linux handles devices (HINT: Why devices in /dev/ are files) or the /proc/ file system (Easily better than sex, though my girlfriend doesn't need to know I said that) or where you'd generally look first for config files.

After this, you'll be laughing really
 
Old 05-25-2009, 12:33 AM   #13
ConnorMarc
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2009
Location: Atlanta, GA
Distribution: Ubuntu 9.04
Posts: 21

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamescondron View Post
To be honest with you, just playing around and exploring is your best bet to learn; you'll never understand anything purely in theory, practice is better.

Learning the basic commands and stuff is fair enough, but those are just programmes, its better to learn about the system because then you'll have somewhere to apply this basic command knowledge. So long as you can navigate around with the terminal (I'd seriously reccommend the terminal as a way of interacting, its a lot quicker) then you're laughing, anything else you can learn as and when you need it, google is a big help

Get to understand how Linux handles devices (HINT: Why devices in /dev/ are files) or the /proc/ file system (Easily better than sex, though my girlfriend doesn't need to know I said that) or where you'd generally look first for config files.

After this, you'll be laughing really
You're probably right.

I did manage to to install a couple programs using sudo from the Terminal today.

I also managed to install one Theme (Black Diamond) succesfully from just the system, not sure how I did the latter, cause it took many tries and it seemed like I did the same thing everytime.

Still haven't touched the Graphics issue, been procrastinating due to intimidation. Now I have some wine in my system, so sleep is next. Good thing tomorrow's a holiday, so I can wake up and get cracking on getting some of this stuff up to par.

Thanks.
 
Old 05-25-2009, 07:45 AM   #14
jamescondron
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Did you ever get that wireless sorted? Because that is always a trip, getting your card working is almost a rite of passage round here; I think most people will remember the first time doing this as a real learning experience.
 
Old 05-25-2009, 02:16 PM   #15
ConnorMarc
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2009
Location: Atlanta, GA
Distribution: Ubuntu 9.04
Posts: 21

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamescondron View Post
Did you ever get that wireless sorted? Because that is always a trip, getting your card working is almost a rite of passage round here; I think most people will remember the first time doing this as a real learning experience.
No, I haven't messed with it as yet. I will keep you guys posted here though.

I'm trying to install another theme (GTK)...still haven't gotten that downpat as yet.

Yes, I'm slow.
 
  


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