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Old 07-28-2016, 11:58 AM   #1
serenety2
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I cannot provide an Administrator password to install program So?


I have tried to install programs using Linux mint 18. The op keeps asking for an administrator password. I do not nor did I know I had one. I need help please. What do I do now?
 
Old 07-28-2016, 01:46 PM   #2
hydrurga
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Quote:
Originally Posted by serenety2 View Post
I have tried to install programs using Linux mint 18. The op keeps asking for an administrator password. I do not nor did I know I had one. I need help please. What do I do now?
Use your normal user password.
 
Old 07-28-2016, 02:09 PM   #3
yancek
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During an installation of an Ubuntu derivative (such as Mint), you are required to create at least one user. That user has administrator rights. Go to the site below where you can download the Mint user manual.

https://www.linuxmint.com/documentation.php
 
Old 07-29-2016, 02:59 PM   #4
frankbell
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This will give you some background information on Ubuntu's (and its derivatives') implementation of sudo, which is what's asking you for a password https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo.

Non-*buntus will normally have you create a root (administrator) and user login at time of installation or on first reboot.

Last edited by frankbell; 07-29-2016 at 03:01 PM.
 
Old 07-29-2016, 07:35 PM   #5
Soadyheid
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As I understand it, distributions based on Redhat, eg. Centos, Fedora, Mandriva will have a root account generated on install with an associated root password.

Debian based distros such as Ubuntu and Mint don't have root accounts but allow users to gain root privilege by using sudo and their user password.

Correct me if I'm wrong.
My

Play Bonny!

 
Old 07-29-2016, 08:30 PM   #6
knudfl
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Re #5.

Debian has a root account / a root password.

The Debian clones like Ubuntu and Mint are using 'sudo'.
 
Old 07-29-2016, 09:20 PM   #7
frankbell
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Quote:
Correct me if I'm wrong
That creepy sudo fetish is a Ubuntu thing. It's not a Debian thing, not at all.
 
Old 07-30-2016, 06:04 AM   #8
hydrurga
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frankbell View Post
That creepy sudo fetish is a Ubuntu thing. It's not a Debian thing, not at all.
Ok, I'll bite Frank. I haven't installed many Linux distros (I know, weird ), but the main distros I use are Linux Mint and Manjaro, both of which I run as a normal user but use sudo to gain superuser privileges. It means putting in my password more than I did with Windows, but I like the heightened security and it suits me fine.

But "creepy" and "fetish"? I don't get that. What have you got against a subset of Linux distros deciding to do things in a way that keeps things simple while forcing/encouraging users to not run as root normally?

Isn't one of the ideas of Linux that we don't all need to sing from the same hymn sheet? I can see the merits in sometimes having a go at shady or peculiar implementations of the Linux/Unix philosophy, but I can't imagine why you've picked on this one. It suits people, it enforces security, it's harmless.

So, why?
 
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Old 07-30-2016, 06:17 AM   #9
hazel
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I first met "universal sudo" on Ubuntu Dapper That was the last Ubuntu I actually used so you can see I'm going back a bit! I really liked it so I use it now in all my distros. The default sudoers file that comes with sudo has a commented line giving universal sudo access to all members of the wheel group. I just uncomment that and add myself to wheel.
 
Old 07-30-2016, 08:59 PM   #10
Shadow_7
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For the *buntu flavours you can use the first user created credentials. Debian does things the old / normal way and has a root user and login. If you have another bootable linux option you can chroot and set the root passwd. For *buntu flavours once you're chrooted, you are root and as long as networking is a go on the host distro you can add your package then. Or change passwords as needed. Otherwise find out the defaults for a given distro on their distro page or forums. And change them.
 
Old 07-30-2016, 09:07 PM   #11
Emerson
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Since root has no business running GUI the difference really does not exist. In Gentoo I do
Code:
su -
to administer the system, in *buntu it would be
Code:
sudo -i
Three more keystrokes, is it worth to talk about?
 
Old 07-30-2016, 09:15 PM   #12
Smokey_justme
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*buntu (so Mint, too) has a 'root' user just like any other distro, it's just disabled.. You can use
Code:
sudo su -
to became root and you can even enable the account and change the password without chroot-ing...

Btw, in my oppinion, in this case, *buntu actually does things right (specially considering the targeted audiences of the distribution)...
 
Old 07-31-2016, 03:36 PM   #13
Jackpot
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Are you just trying to download software from the software center and it asks for your admin credentials?

Ive only went as far as Ubuntu and Kali briefly but you should just be able to run Sudo -s in the terminal to gain Admin rights and just put your standard password. I never tried Mint so not really sure how that would go on your end.

$ Sudo -s
$ ********** (Password)

$ Apt-get update
$ Apt-get software-pkg
 
Old 07-31-2016, 04:18 PM   #14
frankbell
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Quote:
But "creepy" and "fetish"? I don't get that
Because it's pointless and unnecessary. It's like making you use a clutch pedal with an automatic transmission. It adds no value nor security, only a comically surplus level of extra keystrokes. It's fetish-like in that it seems to cast over some persons a fascination beyond normal ken.

I get why the Ubuntu derivatives have it: it's inherited, an unfortunate family trait over which they have no control if they wish to remain within the family. I've not yet seem a persuasive defense (emphasize persuasive) of why Ubuntu decided on it in the first place.

That's just my opinion. You asked for it, you got it. Others are certainly free to disagree with it, but I'm keeping it.
 
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Old 07-31-2016, 06:04 PM   #15
hydrurga
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frankbell View Post
Because it's pointless and unnecessary. It's like making you use a clutch pedal with an automatic transmission. It adds no value nor security, only a comically surplus level of extra keystrokes. It's fetish-like in that it seems to cast over some persons a fascination beyond normal ken.

I get why the Ubuntu derivatives have it: it's inherited, an unfortunate family trait over which they have no control if they wish to remain within the family. I've not yet seem a persuasive defense (emphasize persuasive) of why Ubuntu decided on it in the first place.

That's just my opinion. You asked for it, you got it. Others are certainly free to disagree with it, but I'm keeping it.
Good. I like opinions. :-) Thanks.
 
  


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