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Old 04-19-2006, 01:03 AM   #1
sujee
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I am newbie linux, want to help


How to check,
1.What drivers are loaded?
2.How many hours has the system been running?
3.Which filesystems are known by your system?
4.How long does the system keep the log file in which user logins are monitored?
5.What services be runing?
 
Old 04-19-2006, 01:09 AM   #2
reddazz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sujee
How to check,
1.What drivers are loaded?
2.How many hours has the system been running?
3.Which filesystems are known by your system?
4.How long does the system keep the log file in which user logins are monitored?
5.What services be runing?
  1. lsmod
  2. uptime
  3. cat /proc/filesystems
  4. not sure of that one
  5. ps aux
 
Old 04-19-2006, 01:12 AM   #3
Poetics
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This sounds like homework ...
 
Old 04-19-2006, 01:21 AM   #4
sujee
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Thank you, for your answer. Reddazz
 
Old 04-19-2006, 02:03 AM   #5
reddazz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Poetics
This sounds like homework ...
I thought of that, but I had already posted.
 
Old 04-19-2006, 02:46 AM   #6
timmeke
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4. Login log files like the wtmp log are sometimes rotated by a program called logrotate. Check out /etc/logrotate.conf to know the rotation details. The wtmp log is used by the "last" program to show you the last logins on the system, so it can be considered as a log of login attempts. See also "man last".
 
Old 04-19-2006, 11:57 AM   #7
carambar
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Heh, I agree that this sounds like somebody's homework assignment C'mon sujee, have we busted you?
 
Old 04-19-2006, 01:09 PM   #8
robbbert
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Is there an FAQ / HowTo / Wiki on utilities like that. I mean, somewhere there must be a documentation, containing all shell commands, that was searchable, browsable, and tagged...

Thanks!
 
Old 04-19-2006, 01:51 PM   #9
Poetics
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Actually, most 'shell commands' are not commands linked with the sh or bash shell, persay, but are additional programs piled on top of it -- I know there exist some websites that may be what you're looking for, but they leave out quite a bit due to the sheer complexity of the setup.
 
Old 04-19-2006, 02:22 PM   #10
robbbert
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That's true - everytime you install a new package, there are new shell commands available.

However, there surely must be a comprehensive reference (more than a pure reference: it should be searchable, browsable and tagged) for those commands that are available for most Linux systems?

Thanks
 
Old 04-19-2006, 02:57 PM   #11
reddazz
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There are so many Unix tools available, so I don't think there is central resource somewhere that contains them all. I bought several Linux and Unix admin books and they help when I need to find out how to do something.
 
Old 04-20-2006, 12:21 PM   #12
slamster
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are you looking for something like this

http://www.linuxdevcenter.com/linux/cmd/
 
Old 04-20-2006, 06:24 PM   #13
robbbert
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@reddaz:
Quote:
I don't think there is central resource
Maybe a "somewhat" central one? I mean, there would be a "common denominator" of commands? (I see that it's difficult as, i.e., even "Debian Sarge" can be installed in different ways.)

@slamster:
Thanks, that is helpful in a way. Nevertheless, the commands listed are not self-explaining by their names, and are neither searchable nor tagged. I.e., recently I was searching for a tool that returns the character encoding of a text file (whether that tool may exist or not). I found hints in web articles and news group postings.

I really think there should be a browsable, searchable, and tagged, listing of common Linux commands -- learning them "by mouth" or by happening to find them in a book isn't satisfactory to me.
If the commands were organized in namespaces at least (like "system.text.encoding.GetEncoding()" or "system.remoting.client.ppp.pppoe.Configure()")! Or - in other words - why would I look into / learn the command "setmetamode"?!

Thanks
 
Old 04-21-2006, 03:27 AM   #14
Emmanuel_uk
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How about LQ bookmark and searching for
rute, newbie, admin, guide

That should give you good linux fundations
 
Old 04-24-2006, 04:10 AM   #15
timmeke
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To know what a command does, try it's man page or info page.
Code:
info coreutils
can help you too.
For shell built-in commands, consult the shell's man page (ie "man bash").

If that doesn't cut it for you, try out some sites with Unix/Linux tutorials or docs.
LQ forums are of course a nice start, but maybe you can add sites like
http://linux.about.com/
http://www.tldp.org/

For the rest, I recommend using Google as usual. A quick search turned up the following site:
http://www.ss64.com/bash/ with plenty of Bash commands...
 
  


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