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Old 09-10-2016, 09:42 AM   #1
droid.c3p0
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How to use a SSD for installation of 2 Linuxes ?


I have a 240 GB SSD and would like to install:
1. BlackArch Linux;
2. openSUSE Linux;
How many partitions needed ?
What to be the size of every partition ?
What to be the file system of every partition ?

Last edited by droid.c3p0; 09-10-2016 at 09:44 AM.
 
Old 09-10-2016, 09:51 AM   #2
wpeckham
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Quote:
Originally Posted by droid.c3p0 View Post
I have a 240 GB SSD and would like to install:
1. BlackArch Linux;
2. openSUSE Linux;
How many partitions needed ?
What to be the size of every partition ?
What to be the file system of every partition ?
The quick answer is: exactly the same as if this were a rotational drive.
The slightly longer answer is: why, what do you plan on using the system for?

Seriously, the answer depends, and MUST depend, on how you plan to use the system and what kinds of load and stress should be expected.

Can you feed us a little more detail so we can get a start?

BTW: there are posts and guides here about asking intelligent questions well. I remember reading them back when I first joined. I suggest you go looking for them when you have time. There is a LOT of excellent and useful concepts to be found, and it will help you in more than this site alone!
 
Old 09-10-2016, 10:17 AM   #3
droid.c3p0
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wpeckham View Post
The quick answer is: exactly the same as if this were a rotational drive.
The slightly longer answer is: why, what do you plan on using the system for?

Seriously, the answer depends, and MUST depend, on how you plan to use the system and what kinds of load and stress should be expected.

Can you feed us a little more detail so we can get a start?

BTW: there are posts and guides here about asking intelligent questions well. I remember reading them back when I first joined. I suggest you go looking for them when you have time. There is a LOT of excellent and useful concepts to be found, and it will help you in more than this site alone!
This is a Home PC, so I will start to explore BlackArch or openSUSE depending on which of them I will like more.
In the future may be I will change one of them with a new Linux ....
I have not special plans - this is just a Home PC.
 
Old 09-10-2016, 12:27 PM   #4
IsaacKuo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by droid.c3p0 View Post
I have a 240 GB SSD and would like to install:
1. BlackArch Linux;
2. openSUSE Linux;
How many partitions needed ?
What to be the size of every partition ?
What to be the file system of every partition ?
You need at least 2 partitions. To keep things simple, I suggest using 2 partitions. One ext4 primary partition for BlackArch. Another ext4 primary partition for openSUSE. No swap partition, although both installers will likely give you a warning about that. No worries, though. You can create a swap partition or a swap file (within an existing partition) later if you want. I usually run without swap.

The end result will have this on the SSD:

1) The partition table and GRUB in the MBR pointed to either sda1 or sda2

2) sda1 ext4 partition (BlackArch root partition) ~120GB

3) sda2 ext4 partition (OpenSUSE root partition) ~120GB

After you decide which one you wish to keep, boot to a bootable USB or LiveCD and run gparted to modify the partitions. You'll delete the undesired partition and resize/move the other partition to fill up the whole space. Or you could shrink/move the undesired partition and reformat it as swap. Then you modify the etc/fstab on the remaining partition to utilize the other partition as swap.

The main thing is that the GRUB bootloader in the MBR can only point to one of the two boot folders. That one will be the one "in charge" of the boot menu. So, before you delete one of the partitions, make sure the MBR grub bootloader is pointed to the one you're keeping. Do that by booting into the one you are keeping and running:

Code:
grub-install /dev/sda
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 09-10-2016, 12:35 PM   #5
droid.c3p0
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Registered: Sep 2016
Posts: 42

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Quote:
Originally Posted by IsaacKuo View Post
You need at least 2 partitions. To keep things simple, I suggest using 2 partitions. One ext4 primary partition for BlackArch. Another ext4 primary partition for openSUSE. No swap partition, although both installers will likely give you a warning about that. No worries, though. You can create a swap partition or a swap file (within an existing partition) later if you want. I usually run without swap.

The end result will have this on the SSD:

1) The partition table and GRUB in the MBR pointed to either sda1 or sda2

2) sda1 ext4 partition (BlackArch root partition) ~120GB

3) sda2 ext4 partition (OpenSUSE root partition) ~120GB

After you decide which one you wish to keep, boot to a bootable USB or LiveCD and run gparted to modify the partitions. You'll delete the undesired partition and resize/move the other partition to fill up the whole space. Or you could shrink/move the undesired partition and reformat it as swap. Then you modify the etc/fstab on the remaining partition to utilize the other partition as swap.

The main thing is that the GRUB bootloader in the MBR can only point to one of the two boot folders. That one will be the one "in charge" of the boot menu. So, before you delete one of the partitions, make sure the MBR grub bootloader is pointed to the one you're keeping. Do that by booting into the one you are keeping and running:

Code:
grub-install /dev/sda
@IsaacKuo,
thank you very much !
 
  


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