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Old 07-07-2019, 04:53 PM   #1
ehsan_0
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How to see all drives available on the computer like windows ( c:drive , d:drive , E:drive etc..)


i am new to linux and i just cant understand where the drivers are i have made 4 when i installed linux zorin os and i cant find any thing in the file manger just the file system and /home/*my username* and i think they are the same
 
Old 07-07-2019, 05:13 PM   #2
linus72
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Welcome to LQ!
OK, in your ZorinOS terminal, become root with sudo su plus your user password then issue command lsblk or fdisk -l

Some systems dont let regular users "see" or manipulate drives.
You may have to configure your users permissions.
Quick work arouns is as above in terminal or log out of user desktop and into root desktop then file manager probably sees drives.
What file manager are you using?
 
Old 07-07-2019, 05:19 PM   #3
linus72
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For reference here is mine with 16gb usb plugged in and booting off hard drive via Porteus frugal install
sda is hard drive sdc is usb

lsblk output

Code:
root@porteus:/home/guest# lsblk
NAME   MAJ:MIN RM   SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
sda      8:0    0 149.1G  0 disk 
├─sda1   8:1    0  24.4G  0 part /mnt/sda1
├─sda2   8:2    0  24.4G  0 part /mnt/sda2
├─sda3   8:3    0  25.1G  0 part /mnt/sda3
├─sda4   8:4    0     1K  0 part 
├─sda5   8:5    0  19.9G  0 part /mnt/sda5
├─sda6   8:6    0  19.8G  0 part /mnt/sda6
├─sda7   8:7    0  30.8G  0 part /mnt/sda7
└─sda8   8:8    0   4.8G  0 part [SWAP]
sdc      8:32   1  14.5G  0 disk 
└─sdc1   8:33   1  14.5G  0 part /mnt/sdc1
sr0     11:0    1  1024M  0 rom
and fdisk -l

Code:
root@porteus:/home/guest# fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 149.1 GiB, 160041885696 bytes, 312581808 sectors
Disk model: Hitachi HTS54321
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x92cd386f

Device     Boot     Start       End   Sectors  Size Id Type
/dev/sda1            2048  51202047  51200000 24.4G 83 Linux
/dev/sda2  *     51202048 102402047  51200000 24.4G 83 Linux
/dev/sda3       102402048 154947583  52545536 25.1G 83 Linux
/dev/sda4       154949630 312580095 157630466 75.2G  5 Extended
/dev/sda5       154949632 196564991  41615360 19.9G 83 Linux
/dev/sda6       196567040 238100243  41533204 19.8G 83 Linux
/dev/sda7       238102528 302602239  64499712 30.8G 83 Linux
/dev/sda8       302604288 312580095   9975808  4.8G 82 Linux swap




Disk /dev/sdc: 14.5 GiB, 15527313408 bytes, 30326784 sectors
Disk model: USB DISK 2.0    
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x60594f4f

Device     Boot Start      End  Sectors  Size Id Type
/dev/sdc1  *     2048 30326783 30324736 14.5G  b W95 FAT32
 
Old 07-07-2019, 05:47 PM   #4
jamison20000e
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There's graphical user interfaces (GUI) as well... search in your package manager for maybe something like disk space?
 
Old 07-07-2019, 06:30 PM   #5
ehsan_0
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linus72 View Post
Welcome to LQ!
OK, in your ZorinOS terminal, become root with sudo su plus your user password then issue command lsblk or fdisk -l

Some systems dont let regular users "see" or manipulate drives.
You may have to configure your users permissions.
Quick work arouns is as above in terminal or log out of user desktop and into root desktop then file manager probably sees drives.
What file manager are you using?
Zorin default file manger
 
Old 07-07-2019, 06:41 PM   #6
michaelk
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Welcome to LinuxQuestions.

Code:
 lsblk
NAME   MAJ:MIN RM   SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
sda      8:0    0  24.3G  0 disk 
├─sda1   8:1    0  23.3G  0 part /
├─sda2   8:2    0     1K  0 part 
└─sda5   8:5    0  1022M  0 part [SWAP]
sdb      8:16   0  36.8G  0 disk 
└─sdb1   8:17   0  36.8G  0 part /mnt/data
linux does not have separate drives like Windows. Everything is referenced from the /(root) partition. Here is one of my virtual systems with a simple partitioning scheme. Name shows the device or drive and partition number, mount point shows where other partitions are attached or mounted to the /(root) partition. My /(root) partition is /dev/sda1 (1st drive partition 1), my data partition /dev/sdb1 (second drive/partition 1) mounted to / at /mnt/data which is nothing more then a directory.


It can be a bit confusing for the newcomer. If you have a separate home partition then it show up as another mount point from / as /home. [SWAP] is a special partition and is not mounted like a regular filesystem.
 
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Old 07-07-2019, 06:45 PM   #7
ehsan_0
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i want to see them like this and use them https://media.askvg.com/articles/ima...e_Sections.png
now i only can use the file system and its only 100gb i have other 400gb that i cant see or use
 
Old 07-07-2019, 06:49 PM   #8
ehsan_0
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Original Poster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelk View Post
Welcome to LinuxQuestions.

Code:
 lsblk
NAME   MAJ:MIN RM   SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
sda      8:0    0  24.3G  0 disk 
├─sda1   8:1    0  23.3G  0 part /
├─sda2   8:2    0     1K  0 part 
└─sda5   8:5    0  1022M  0 part [SWAP]
sdb      8:16   0  36.8G  0 disk 
└─sdb1   8:17   0  36.8G  0 part /mnt/data
linux does not have separate drives like Windows. Everything is referenced from the /(root) partition. Here is one of my virtual systems with a simple partitioning scheme. Name shows the device or drive and partition number, mount point shows where other partitions are attached or mounted to the /(root) partition. My /(root) partition is /dev/sda1 (1st drive partition 1), my data partition /dev/sdb1 (second drive/partition 1) mounted to / at /mnt/data which is nothing more then a directory.


It can be a bit confusing for the newcomer. If you have a separate home partition then it show up as another mount point from / as /home. [SWAP] is a special partition and is not mounted like a regular filesystem.
thanks a lot ..i am not using windows any more just asking coz 400gb is lost from my hdd and only file system is working so i have to re partition and give all the space to the file system ?
 
Old 07-07-2019, 11:28 PM   #9
New World Man
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ehsan_0 View Post
i want to see them like this and use them https://media.askvg.com/articles/ima...e_Sections.png
now i only can use the file system and its only 100gb i have other 400gb that i cant see or use
The closest I know of to that is GParted. But that's sort of graphic, not the same though, but it will show mount points of mounted partitions. But you need to keep in mind that Linux looks at partitions differently than Windows, even if it is a NTFS, FAT16/32, or exFAT partition.
Dolphin ( KDEs file manager ) might come close too if it's configured right - it's been a long time since I used it ( as soon as it no longer allowed launching it as root, I stopped using it, but used to love it )
 
Old 07-08-2019, 12:43 AM   #10
FlinchX
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I am going to be the proverbial grumpy guy who makes Linux communities look scary and unfriendly for newcomers

Pay attention to what you type and check for accidental typos, because sometimes they change the meaning of words. Example: "drive" in your topic name, "driver" in your actual question. These are totally different things.

Linux will gently push you towards better understanding of what's going on behind the curtain.

The hard disk drive is the physical device that stores data. You can run commands like 'dmesg | grep sda', 'dmesg | grep sdb' etc as root to get some info about the size of your devices. Here sda/sdb/and so on are generic names for this kind of devices in Linux.

The next step after using an empty hard drive is to partition it: as in split it to a couple of parts. You do that in Windows too when installing the system, but please don't think by analogy, because partitioning a hard drive isn't exactly creating those c:, d:, e: drives that you see in Windows. More details about it below.

To see the partitioning of your hard drive you can do 'fdisk -l /dev/sda' - this is a read-only operation that only displays the layout, but again, you need to run it as root. Or you can do 'gdisk -l /dev/sda' instead, if you use GPT instead of legacy MBR. More details about it here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_boot_record , https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GUID_Partition_Table but don't get too stressed if you encounter things you don't understand there. Learning is a process where you often need to know over a thing multiple times to be able to understand it. You can also use an interactive tool instead, like cfdisk/cgdisk (but since it is interactive, the risk of messing up things increases!). Just run the tool (as root as well) with the device name as argument 'cfdisk /dev/sda' or 'cgdisk /dev/sda', have a look at the info it displays then use the arrows on your keyboard to navigate to the [Quit] button. You can also use a GUI tool like gparted, but it might not be available by default, you may need to install it first.

Once you have a hard drive partitioned, you still can't make files and directories on it. For that, you need to add another layer on top of your partitions that is called filesystem. As usual, wikipedia is a good starting point: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File_system . In Linux, filesystems are made with mkfs. You can type 'man mkfs' and have a look, even if most likely it's not too newbie friendly.

If you go back to what I said above, Windows (and if I remember correctly, gparted too) actually does these things at the same time.

There are more advanced setups than static size partitions, feel free to have a look at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logica...Manager_(Linux), but as a new user you are unlikely to need this from the start.

Once you get past this, the next step would be to learn that Linux uses a different naming scheme, so it doesn't have those c:, d:, e: names that are common to you. 'man hier' is a good starting point for this.
 
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