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Old 10-27-2004, 11:02 PM   #1
primortial_k0s
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Angry is it possible to install w/o ISO?


I downloaded the SUSE 9.1 folder 64 bit from the SUSE FTP server. I have made a boot CD, and can boot from it but how to i complete the install. I have 6 gigs worth of SUSE and dont know what to do with it, PLEASE HELP!!!!

Thanks

--Brett

Last edited by primortial_k0s; 10-28-2004 at 12:57 AM.
 
Old 10-28-2004, 01:03 AM   #2
bigrigdriver
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You might find your answer here.
 
Old 10-28-2004, 05:25 AM   #3
jschiwal
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Since SuSE released the 9.1 Amd64 version on a DVD you may try simply creating the boot floppy images.
 
Old 10-28-2004, 12:05 PM   #4
gd2shoe
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Is this SuSE's boot CD (available from ftp), or just some live linux? I haven't tried the option, but the boot CD at i386/9.1/boot/boot.iso gives the option to install from a hard drive partition. Does your CD (x86_64/9.1/boot/boot.iso) even give you the option? If it does, why doesn't it work? What does it say?

Last edited by gd2shoe; 10-28-2004 at 12:08 PM.
 
Old 10-29-2004, 12:19 PM   #5
primortial_k0s
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i tried installing from hard drive... I have two drives 40g-master Win XP and a 120-slave contains Linux and misc files.
I tried installing from hard drive and i navigated to the 2nd drive (120 gig w/linux files) and it asked for a directory so i navigated to d:\linux\9.1 (where all the files are) and i get a file or directory not found. I've tried several directories inside the 9.1 and still get a file or directory not found error. Would there be a problem in that I have my drive partitioined into two sections D/X? Or what should i type in the path if my linux files are in D:\linux\9.1?
 
Old 10-29-2004, 03:38 PM   #6
gd2shoe
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C: and D: are for DOS and Windows systems only. You will first need to refer to the partition holding the information, and then refer to /linux/9.1
notice also the forward slashes, instead of backslashes. I'm going to power up another machine here and take a look at how SuSE has it setup...
 
Old 10-29-2004, 04:02 PM   #7
gd2shoe
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OK. When it asks for "harddisk partition." hda refers to your primary master drive and hdb is the slave. The numbers trailing the drive are to designate different partitions on the drive. If I understand your setup, you will see hda1 and hdb1. If you choose hdb1 and then direct it to linux/9.1 (no first slash) it should be able to find the files.

I do see another potential problem though... What format is your slave drive? If you are trying to install linux onto a partition formated by Windows (FAT16, FAT32, NTFS) it will not only probably fail to install, but you will have a broken installation when it finishes. Linux must be installed on a partition formated with Unix like file system (ext2, ext3, reiserfs - SuSE recommended, jfs, xfs, etc. etc.). Linux can read and write to FAT32 partitions (used by Windows 95, 98, ME, still supported in 2000 and XP). Linux can also read NTFS (2000, XP) just fine, but it is generally advisable to not attempt to write to it (Microsoft hasn't released the full specification, there are horror stories of NTFS dying after Linux has tried to write to it...).

Bottom line: Install Linux to a Linux compatible file system. I would recommend temporarily copying the information over to your NTFS partition, and planning to repartition and reformat the slave drive. You can do that when installing SuSE. I'd make at least one partition to keep Linux in, and one FAT32 partition that you can stick stuff in to send back to Windows XP (that way you're never tempted to try to write to your NTFS partition.)

Good luck!
 
Old 10-29-2004, 08:32 PM   #8
primortial_k0s
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thanks a lot for the advice...believe it or not my school offered to buy SuSE 9.1 64 bit for their own 64 bit machine and they're letting me us the disks. As of right now, I'm writing this message in linux :-P I'm lovin' it so far. One question though. How in the hell do I find out if I installed 64 bit or 32? I did the DVD install and one side is 32, the other 64... I'm not sure if the label saying 64 facing up would be the 64 bit or the other way around. Hehe, I'm now trying to find out how to figure out the information about my OS so I can figure this out. 64 bit OS is the only reason i wanted linux :-P. Also, how would I get drivers for my ATi Radeon 9700 Pro and my Creative Audigy Gamer 2? ATi has a "program" check.sh on their website that they say to run to figure out your version to tell which drivers to download...but to tell ya the truth. I have no freakin clue how to access the console and use it and such. Haha, I'll learn eventually; any help w/the drivers as well as OS information would be great though, THANKS!!
 
Old 10-29-2004, 09:52 PM   #9
btmiller
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uname -m will tell you which architecture the kernel was compiled for. If the kernel was compiled for a particular architecture, then the rest of the system probably would have been too.
 
Old 10-30-2004, 06:28 PM   #10
gd2shoe
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In case you haven't found it yet, the Konsole is on the bottom and looks like a monitor and a shell (many programs are spelled with K and G in the name standing for KDE or Gnome)

To get to a true console (not that you need to) you can hold the ctrl+alt keys and push F2-F6. ctrl+alt+F7 will give you your graphical interface back. Have fun, and good luck learning!
 
  


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