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Old 05-07-2010, 07:00 PM   #16
jschiwal
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Check the linuxprinting.org site for your printer model. Point your browser to "http://localhost:631". This is the cups web interface. If a PPD file exists for your printer, then you may be able to configure printing via this interface. There may be a similar printer you could select that may be close enough. Also try network printing via ipp: on your XP host.

You have potentially 3 problems that I see. 1) Printer not supported 2) Problem due to vmware configuration 3) Contention problem with the device between your VMWare guest and the XP host.
 
Old 05-08-2010, 09:34 AM   #17
sundialsvcs
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It's important to understand that printer drivers and (kernel) device drivers are not exactly the same thing.

A device driver is a piece of software that the operating system kernel requires in order to "talk to" a locally-attached piece of hardware such as a USB port, and maybe to talk to a specific device attached to such a port.

A printer driver is a sort of "personality module" which the print-spooler (probably CUPS) uses to communicate with a particular brand of printer. CUPS is a userland program: it is not part of the kernel.

The single word, "driver," is (for better or for worse) ambiguously used in both cases.

Most distros that I know of provide "packages" for printer-drivers just like they do for other things, so that you can use the "package" mechanism consistently for everything.

When you are troubleshooting a problem with a printer, however, this distinction may become important. There are several reasons why a printer may fail to print, and you must diagnose the problem.
 
Old 05-09-2010, 08:43 PM   #18
ArthurSittler
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CUPS = Common Unix Printing System

CUPS is an acronym for Common Unix System. This is software that will probably make your printer work on a Linux or Unix computer. Your distribution probably includes CUPS, or it may provide a method for installing it, such as apt-get or aptitude.

You must be equivalent to root to install CUPS and root must have a password set. There are other good reasons that root should have a password, but CUPS will not install unless root has a password.
 
Old 05-10-2010, 07:36 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArthurSittler View Post
CUPS is an acronym for Common Unix System. This is software that will probably make your printer work on a Linux or Unix computer. Your distribution probably includes CUPS, or it may provide a method for installing it, such as apt-get or aptitude.

You must be equivalent to root to install CUPS and root must have a password set. There are other good reasons that root should have a password, but CUPS will not install unless root has a password.
You could instead use "sudo lppasswd -a <username>". I don't know how Ubuntu does it please don't recommend enabling the root account unnecessarily. Using the systems gui cups/printer configuration may involve policy-kit as well for some distros.

Last edited by jschiwal; 05-10-2010 at 07:38 AM.
 
Old 05-23-2010, 06:17 PM   #20
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I have used http://localhost:631 option to add printer. And after all steps done at the end I have configured printer at last. Now when I want to print any document I write it in for example OpenOffice and send it for printing. Now I can really see the printer available. But after I press the button "Print" the green light on the printer blinks once but nothing gets printed. What should I do? The printer seems to be installed but prints nothing at the same time.
 
Old 05-29-2010, 01:24 PM   #21
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Hello, anybody?
 
Old 05-29-2010, 04:12 PM   #22
baig
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see log in /var/log/messages

Last edited by baig; 05-29-2010 at 04:16 PM.
 
Old 05-30-2010, 04:17 PM   #23
ovod88
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Sorry, baig but what precisely I have to look at? I'm not familiar with var/log/messages. what should I change in this file?
 
Old 05-30-2010, 04:19 PM   #24
jamescondron
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Send something to print, then look at the bottom of that file, see what it says
 
Old 06-01-2010, 02:36 PM   #25
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I made a lot attempts to print one A4 page but the printer only blinks and no messages are sent to notify about success or failure of printing the page. So it is like my printer receives my request but it doesn't khow what to do with it.
 
Old 07-07-2010, 06:17 PM   #26
ovod88
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No suggestions?
 
Old 07-15-2010, 07:41 AM   #27
baig
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open a terminal and type

sudo tail -f /var/log/messages

keep it open and now from open office or some editor print something and see what message comes in /var/log/messages

that may help to understand what's going on there
 
Old 07-16-2010, 05:02 PM   #28
ovod88
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Thaks. I'll try it...
 
  


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