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Old 12-26-2003, 03:09 AM   #1
shemjaza
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Registered: Dec 2003
Location: uk
Distribution: redhat
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how to do a non-destructive repartitioning ?


I am confused and lost.I'm willing to get linux redhat 9.0 installed without formatting any of my disks.Here is the needed information:
drives available:2(c,d)
space in total:20 gigabyte
c drive space: 6 gigabyte
d drive space:14 gigabyte
c drive free space:1.2 gigabyte ( running winxp)
d drive free space : 6.1 gigabyte
name of cd drive: e
name of floppy drive: a


I bought the full 3 cd version of redhat but I just want a minimal install and to learn the text commands,using the mouse etc...

Everywhere I see people deleting existing partitions and then installing.That's not what I want to do.I want to install linux on my d drive's 6gigabyte freespace without formatting or deleting anything.Wll it work if I manually copy all the files from cd1 ( 690 mb approximately) into my d drive and then run setup.exe from dos mode ? I tried to learn about non-destructive partioning or partition resizing.but no effect.If someone can tell me what to do step my step that will be most helpful.a list of basic commands will be gratefully accepted.
all the files in my c an d drives are in fat32.will that cause a problem ?tia

Last edited by shemjaza; 12-26-2003 at 03:24 AM.
 
Old 12-26-2003, 12:29 PM   #2
benjithegreat98
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You will have to repartition your harddrive, namely your 2nd and larger drive. You will need to get a copy of Partition Magic or some other non-destructive partitoning tool. Just resize the larger drive. Leave about 4 - 5 gigs of empty space at the end of the drive. Then you can boot from the RH disk 1. You may need to set you mainboard to boot from cd.

here are some basic commands
http://www.justlinux.com/nhf/Command_Reference

You can see your fat32 parts from Linux. When the partitioning section of RH comes up you need to give those partitions labels. The label would be something like /mnt/winxp and /mnt/datadrive or something like that. You can also do it later, but you'll have to figure that out. There's pletty of online documentation about that.

One note: If you install on the 6 gig's free space you will have to resize that drive (no choice on that matter) You'd pretty much have to leave windows with no free space on that drive. You wouldn't be happy with that setup.
 
Old 12-26-2003, 02:25 PM   #3
Berhanie
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Registered: Dec 2003
Location: phnom penh
Distribution: Fedora
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shemjara,

There is no need for you to reformat or delete anything or to buy
any paritionion tools, as everything you need is on your installation
CDs. You could even make a full rather than a minimal installation, provided you're willing to use a few gigs of the unused space in your D drive. Here's the outline of what needs to be done (hopefully, someone that's currently running Redhat/Fedora will provide more detail):

1. Defragment drive D.

2. Insert the installation disk and go through the steps. Pay particular
attention to the "disk partitioning" step. Your drive C and D will most
likely appear as /dev/hda1 and /dev/hda2, respectively, on the partitioning tool (Disk Druid?) screen. What you need to do now is shrink /dev/hda2 to make room for a Linux partition. You can either
choose to do this manually (thereby having full control over how much
room to allocate for Linux), or choose to use to have the installation made
automatically to the entire free space in your /dev/hda2 partition.

The point is that what you want to do is possible.

Last edited by Berhanie; 12-26-2003 at 02:27 PM.
 
Old 12-27-2003, 12:51 AM   #4
shemjaza
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Registered: Dec 2003
Location: uk
Distribution: redhat
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shrink /dev/hda2 is a command?
will I really need partitioning magic if I wish not to delte the other things in my d drive?or is that possible by using disk druid
 
Old 12-27-2003, 01:27 AM   #5
Berhanie
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no, "shrink" is not a command.

and, as long as your partitions are fat32, as you say they are,
you don't need to use partition magic.

please read the installation guide. it will answer all of your questions:
Quote:
https://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/linux/RHL-9-Manual/install-guide/

Last edited by Berhanie; 12-27-2003 at 01:35 AM.
 
Old 12-27-2003, 04:19 AM   #6
shemjaza
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Location: uk
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http://www.nondos.com/frames/download_knoppix.html


how can I download knoppix from here.I don't know how to burn.Are there single knoppix cd's in the market?
 
Old 12-27-2003, 04:31 AM   #7
whansard
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Location: Mosquitoville
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download the iso cdrom image, and burn it to a cdr with your cdburning
software. knoppix is cool.
 
Old 12-27-2003, 05:48 AM   #8
Berhanie
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I see that you're not planning to read the installation guide. ok, i
read through the relevant portions for you (in case you're interested,
the most relevant for you is Section 3.18: automatic partitioning). Keeping
in mind that nothing in this world is perfect, you might want
to back up any data residing on the harddrive we are about to partition.

Here's what you need to do in brief. To make things easy, we'll use
the entire free space on your D drive.

1. Defragment your drive D with your Windows tools
(and make sure afterward that indeed you have free space there).

2. Insert the first of the Redhat CDs, and follow the directions, choosing
your language, keyboard, mouse, installation type,... until you reach the
"Disk Partitioning Setup".

3. At this point, choose "automatic partitioning" and then click "next".

4. Under the "select the drive(s) to use for this installation", select the harddrive to which you'll be installing linux. If you only have one drive,
there will be only one drive to choose from and it'll most likely be called /dev/hda. What Windows calls your C and D drives are not
actually drives, but rather two partitions of the same drive. Most likely,
you bought your computer with only one hard drive.
ok, now from right above the "select the drive ..." business,
choose "keep all partitions and use existing free space". And,
on the bottom of the screen, let's leave the "Review (and modify if needed)
the partitions created" unselected -- if you select it, you'll get a final
preview of what your partitions will look like before the actual formatting
takes place. click "next".

I think that the actual partitioning takes at this point. I'm not
100% sure about that. But, regardless, we
are now past the most difficult part of the installation.

Now continue with the installation screens setting up the bootloader, and
whatever else follows.

One final note: even though it's a lot of work, it's a good idea to read
through the entire Installation Guide before proceding with your installation. I tried to give the best advice I could, but there's no
substitute to taking the time to read things carefully for oneself.

Good luck!
 
Old 12-27-2003, 10:30 AM   #9
shemjaza
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Location: uk
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What's so dangerous if there is still 3/2 gig free space left after the installation ?Assuming that I am not going to install more things...?
 
Old 12-27-2003, 11:17 AM   #10
whansard
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stuff can go wrong. when resizing partitions, programs can crash or
get errors, and then you lose part or everything on the drive.
I've seen it happen. partition it is resizing, and it hits something it doesn't
understand, then just stops, or sits in the same place all day, until you
give up.
 
Old 12-27-2003, 11:23 AM   #11
Berhanie
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Are you asking if it is possible to leave more room in your
Windows drive D partition? (If so, I hope someone would jump
in now and give you a step-by-step account on how this can be
done).
 
Old 12-27-2003, 11:51 AM   #12
shemjaza
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Registered: Dec 2003
Location: uk
Distribution: redhat
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Nah not really I was just worried about the deleting things though.

I don't know some important information.
They are:
1.The video cipset used on my video card(what is a video chipset?).
2.Horizontal sync range of my monitor.
3.Vertical sync range of my monitor.
4.I/O address of the sound card.
5.DMA address of the card.
6.IRQ'S of the card.
7.Vendor and model of the soundcard.(I have got a built-in soundcard for a gigabyte motherboard I guess I can get that in the manual.
8.Number of cylinders in my hard drive.
9.Number of heads in my hard drive.
10.Number of sectors per track.
11.Configuration of my network adaptor or lan card ( ethernet realtek something....)

The documentation I have been following asks me to find out these things before installing...and yeh..once I boot from the cd , what do I need to type...do I need to run fdsk or something ?

Last edited by shemjaza; 12-27-2003 at 01:36 PM.
 
Old 12-28-2003, 01:36 AM   #13
whansard
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that stuff is good to know, but you don't have to know.
and you can't know the heads, cylinders, sectors or your hard drive.
that's even hidden from the computer.

it's better and safer to know the monitor stuff, and you might have to
figure out the video stuff to get X working. ( the windowing environment).

if you have windows on the machine now, you can look in the device
manager to find out a bunch of that stuff.

the chipset on your video or sound card is the specific kind of chip.
usually it's the biggest chip on the card, like it will say cmi8330 or
whatever on the chip.
 
Old 12-28-2003, 02:10 AM   #14
brew1brew
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I personally would recommend a noob use mandrake for first install. The partition tool in mandrake does an excellent job at resizing windows partitions, it will even resize a ntfs partition. No flames please, just a suggestion.

Also what ever you decide to do, I would READ the install guide for the distribution that you install, Red hat, Fedora or Mandrake.
 
  


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