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Old 04-15-2012, 11:23 PM   #1
gongsheng
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how to begin my linux learning?


as a newbie,i almost know nothing about linux, where should i begin?
 
Old 04-15-2012, 11:55 PM   #2
tollingalong
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Experience is the best teacher.
Take an old PC, install say Fedora and use it on a day to day basis. You'll run into problems. As you do you'll solve them and you'll learn.

How do I play DVDs?
How do I open M$ Excel files?
How do I share with my Windoze machine?
How do I hide my collectibles from my wife?

As you solve problems you'll grow, just like everything thing else in your life.
 
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Old 04-16-2012, 01:06 AM   #3
gongsheng
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thank you very much。
 
Old 04-16-2012, 03:31 AM   #4
tailinlinux
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gongsheng View Post
as a newbie,i almost know nothing about linux, where should i begin?
First is you have to study first all linux basic terminal commands and
terminologies on linux system for example command prompt or windows and if
you're using linux it is called terminal.


Aries
 
Old 04-16-2012, 05:48 AM   #5
Satyaveer Arya
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If you really want to learn linux, start from the beginning and abcd of linux, then I'll recommend Slackware for you. You can get so many links and websites for learning online. Search them on google, you'll come to know.
 
Old 04-16-2012, 06:17 AM   #6
k3lt01
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I am going to go against the current flow and suggest you install something stable and something that requires very little effort after installation to start using.

If you install something like Slackware as suggested above and want to install something else you are going to have to learn very quickly about dependencies. If this is what you want to do you may as well start with LFS (Linux From Scratch). As much as I dislike distros like Ubuntu now there are still some good versions available like 10.04. or even Linux Mint, and my favourite Debian 6 (Squeeze). Debian can take a little bit of setting up, nothing like Slackware will if you need to add anything, but once it is working you will have a rock solid operating system.

Apart from that, the way to learn is to do things and by asking questions and by reading. No body does anything naturally, we all learn even if it is only a minute bit we all learn. So I would suggest you install something "easy", read the documentation provided on the site for the distro you choose to use. Experiment with it and after a while you will set it up to how you want it to be set up.
 
Old 04-16-2012, 10:20 AM   #7
bteeuwen170
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Try to search a tour of linux on YouTube or read this: http://www.linuxhelp.net/newbies/
 
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Old 04-16-2012, 07:09 PM   #8
chrism01
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For the cmd line, this is a good place to start http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz
Note that if you just do basic office work & web surfing you may not need to know the cli, but its very useful if you go further or want to really understand Linux, in which case its indispensable.
 
Old 04-16-2012, 11:53 PM   #9
GregJetter
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The answer depends on what you plan to do with Linux , If you want to learn the internals of how it works , hack on it that kind of stuff , then Start with Slackware as it contains a basic linux without a lot of wizards to configure services , you will be creating your configurations for most things without a lot of built in help , this makes you learn what and why quickly . When I started out Linux came on a series of 5 inch floppies , and if all went well at the end of the install you were greeted with a login prompt , no graphical user interface , just the command line , I was forced to learn how x- windows worked so i could install it with my video card and display. , how my sound card worked and how to mount file systems , I soon progressed into learning how to set up services like a web server , mail , ftp or how to talk to windows machines with samba . I learned how to read all the different configuration files for all the different services one after the other... It sure made me thankfully for the wizards in the other distros as time went by , now I very seldom use the command line but I know what's going on under the hood so if need be I can diagnose and fix any problem that comes up.

If you just want to know enough to use the system productively then go with something like fedora or ubuntu , they have lots of wizards to help you configure things without you having to know what and why things are done.

Also consider running linux from a CD or usb thumb drive , so you don't have to worry about how to install onto your current machine.
that will go a long way in stopping the frustration . Also join or start a Linux users group , as when learning there's nothing better than having access to peers that have gone through or are having the same problems your going to encounter as you learn.
 
Old 04-17-2012, 03:00 PM   #10
kb2tfa
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very good answers, depends on what you want to do. I learned from installing on an old pc, and fixing things as they came up. usually getting things like dvd and printers to work. then I bought a book on command line and learned the system. I also purchased a centos sever, and began learning how to setup a webserver by googleing and reading up on things.
 
Old 04-17-2012, 04:17 PM   #11
jola66
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RE: linux learning

I also am a newbie but have learned that making CDs/DVDs or using USB drives allows me to check-out many distros, so try that.
Also, the Mint & Ubuntu versions are user friendly. I am using Lubuntu for an old thinkpad & it works great.

You have to consider the hardware of you machine, some older machines have trouble with the newer linux's-just depends.

Good luck & enjoy, -jola66
 
Old 04-18-2012, 03:45 AM   #12
Satyaveer Arya
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Quote:
I am going to go against the current flow and suggest you install something stable and something that requires very little effort after installation to start using.
Isn't the Slackware stable and requires little effort to install? Isn't it easy to use?
 
Old 04-18-2012, 02:55 PM   #13
k3lt01
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Satyaveer Arya View Post
Isn't the Slackware stable and requires little effort to install? Isn't it easy to use?
Doesn't it leave you the user to work out dependencies? What happens if you miss something you need for your new program to work? Does it remain stable? Slackware is good but it's not something I would rush a new user into.
 
Old 04-18-2012, 03:06 PM   #14
kyrunner
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I started with my feet to the fire. I installed Centos no GUI and built a website.
 
  


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