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Old 01-15-2007, 09:12 PM   #1
khhome06
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How linux develop?


Hi, this is my first post, and my first step toward using linux.

i do like to ask some question to understand linux better, hope the question dont sound too stupid.

first, i've heard linux is build by thousands of people, anyone can contribute isit? If anyone can code, wouldnt it be a mess?

Second, those contribute in developing linux, do they get anything in return, like salary etc?

Thanks!
 
Old 01-15-2007, 09:20 PM   #2
frob23
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Anyone can contribute... but the code is discussed and reviewed before making it into the kernel or a major distribution.

Typically, many people who develop full time for Linux do get paid to do it. Usually as their employer uses Linux and benefits from their efforts. But, officially, no. You contribute because you want to... not for a return.
 
Old 01-15-2007, 09:20 PM   #3
PatrickNew
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Yep, anyone can contribute code. "Linux" properly refers to one specific part of the operating system known as the kernel, but it is often used to refer to entire OS's which use Linux. Anyone can contribute code, but most programs have someone managing them. So, if your patch is really ugly or awful, it can be rejected. This helps things from becoming a mess. Also, many programs try to achieve modularity, so that you can work on a part of a program without seeing the rest of it. Some programs are a mess though.

As far as compensation - not really. Some people are lucky enough to be hired by someone like Red Hat or Canonical who will pay them to develop, but for the most part software is done on a volunteer basis.
 
Old 01-15-2007, 09:26 PM   #4
pixellany
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Not stupid....

Perhaps one reason that Linux and Open Source have not caught on more is that people have a hard time visualizing how it can all possibly work.

You questions apply to all Open Source SW--not just Linux. Each project has a management hierarchy which control what modifications get accepted. I would imagine that the selection process for the leaders varies widely. If, for example, anyone is paying the developers, then that would have a big influence on who the leader is.

The reward? Some, I am sure, are simply altruistic and donate their time while still holding down a "day job". Others are paid by companies who will at least indirectly benefit from their work.

Do some Googling using "open source" and you will find a lot more stuff.
 
Old 01-15-2007, 10:19 PM   #5
khhome06
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Thank for all the help.

True, the reason why (at least me) dont dare to use linux is because it is confusing.

For windows, i know there's a company developing it, call microsoft. when i wan to buy, i go into a shop, ask the sale person and he/she will advice me on which OS best suite me, easy. If i face a problem, i can just ask friends around me.

For linux, i need to do my own research, and linux got alot of brand, i dont known which best suite me, and worst none of my friend use linux.

That's the reason why i wait till now, when i finally have enough courage to try linux.
 
Old 01-15-2007, 10:59 PM   #6
PatrickNew
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Maybe none of your friends use linux now, but make a bunch of friends here and you'll have a bunch of friends who use linux. :-) But seriously, Linux tends to be much better supported than Windows, because a large portion (relatively) of the developers and users are very community oriented. I've never sought help here and not found it.
 
Old 01-15-2007, 11:32 PM   #7
indienick
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Just so you don't get scared off of Linux too easily (which is quite easy to have happen), I suggest starting out with a distribution like Mandriva - it has alot of easy-to-use configuration tools all located in a program called "MCC" - Mandriva Control Centre.

I've also heard of Mepis and Ubuntu being very newbie-friendly.

EDIT: To further add to what PatrickNew is saying:
Linux has amazing support (compared to Microsoft, which - last I heard - asks for $40 USD per hour for support). There are some issues that may arise where you may not get an answer, but those issues are very few, and far between.

Last edited by indienick; 01-15-2007 at 11:34 PM.
 
Old 01-16-2007, 12:46 AM   #8
khhome06
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PatrickNew
Yep, anyone can contribute code. "Linux" properly refers to one specific part of the operating system known as the kernel, but it is often used to refer to entire OS's which use Linux. Anyone can contribute code, but most programs have someone managing them. So, if your patch is really ugly or awful, it can be rejected. This helps things from becoming a mess. Also, many programs try to achieve modularity, so that you can work on a part of a program without seeing the rest of it. Some programs are a mess though.

As far as compensation - not really. Some people are lucky enough to be hired by someone like Red Hat or Canonical who will pay them to develop, but for the most part software is done on a volunteer basis.
Can anyone advice me on where i can read more about this linux governing community, for example which community is in charge of accepting/rejecting code. If a developer edit some code, where do he/she send the edited code to?

Thank!
 
Old 01-16-2007, 03:26 AM   #9
Zmyrgel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by khhome06
Can anyone advice me on where i can read more about this linux governing community, for example which community is in charge of accepting/rejecting code. If a developer edit some code, where do he/she send the edited code to?

Thank!
Check out
http://www.kernel.org/ and
http://kernelnewbies.org/
 
Old 01-16-2007, 04:05 AM   #10
khhome06
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Originally Posted by Zmyrgel

Thank for your help.!
 
Old 01-16-2007, 06:30 AM   #11
V!NCENT
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I suggest you take a look at this website first: makethemove.net
 
Old 01-16-2007, 10:55 AM   #12
PatrickNew
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I think it's pretty important to make the distinction between wanting to code on Linux, and wanting to code on software for Gnu/Linux. If you want to code for the kernel, then try the kernel.org and kernelnewbies.org. If you don't know what a kernel is, you probably want to code for programs that run on linux. The structure here varies from program to program. Just look until you find one you like and email the developers to offer help.
 
Old 01-16-2007, 10:29 PM   #13
sundialsvcs
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Here's my take on it ...

Surf to places like http://www.kerneltrap.org and you will begin to get a sense of what Linux kernel-development is all about.

Really, the idea of Linux isn't "business illegitimate." Some very big players, including the Ultimate Kahuna, IBM, are behind it and for perfectly-sensible reasons.

(Bear in mind that "open source" does not necessarily equate to "all is free.")

As we all know, one viable strategy is the one that companies like Microsoft use: you want to buy an operating system, and you don't want to develop it. You want us to develop it, and to maintain it, and in exchange we "own" it.

That, of course, is "legitimate." It made Bill a very rich man and deservedly so. But it is not the only one...

Another strategy is the one used by Linux. Here, cooperative development of the operating-system kernel (and related software) puts everyone on equal footing in exchange for everyone's professional contribution. No one can make a proprietary, "this is mine" claim on it, so everyone can share the benefits of it.

From this "thus so nobly advanced" vantage-point, all of the contributors can take advantage of "the rising tide that lifts all boats." They make their money in other ways.

And .. it works.

Last edited by sundialsvcs; 01-16-2007 at 10:30 PM.
 
Old 01-17-2007, 08:54 AM   #14
ecuas
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Quote:
I've never sought help here and not found it.
Thats an understatement...
 
  


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