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Old 03-12-2012, 09:35 PM   #1
fnguy4545
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How can I tell if I'm an admin in Linux


I looked in /etc/group and don't see an admin group-- or maybe i don't know what to look for.

I can find myself joeuser:x:7:... and my group reallycoolpeople:x:3:Joe..., and others.

Basically I'm trying to understand if I can run commands of an admin, like root.
 
Old 03-12-2012, 09:39 PM   #2
MS3FGX
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Only the root account has root-level permissions. Giving root-level permissions to other accounts would defeat the purpose.
 
Old 03-12-2012, 10:03 PM   #3
Tinkster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fnguy4545 View Post
I looked in /etc/group and don't see an admin group-- or maybe i don't know what to look for.

I can find myself joeuser:x:7:... and my group reallycoolpeople:x:3:Joe..., and others.

Basically I'm trying to understand if I can run commands of an admin, like root.
Philosophical response:
Quote:
If you have to ask the question you're not an admin.
Realistic approach:
Quote:
That will depend on your distribution.

Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 03-12-2012, 10:36 PM   #4
Satyaveer Arya
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Quote:
Basically I'm trying to understand if I can run commands of an admin, like root.
No you cannot. Only the root i.e., the superuser have the permission to do administrative tasks.
 
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Old 03-13-2012, 12:15 AM   #5
mark_alfred
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Some regular users can be given some root (aka administrative) powers via sudo. Ubuntu is an example of a distribution that gives such powers to regular users.

Anyway, in answer to your original question, to check if you're a member of the group adm, just run the "groups" command at the terminal. Also, to see how sudo is set up on your system, run the "visudo" command (of course, only root can run that command, so if you can run it, then you've got a lot of power).

The other thing you can do is see if you can install a program on your system. If you can, then you've got some administrative power.

Last edited by mark_alfred; 03-13-2012 at 12:23 AM.
 
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Old 03-13-2012, 08:35 AM   #6
fnguy4545
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I think what I'm reading is that sudo is really what I'm looking for. I want joe, mary and fred to be able to edit cron as an example but no one else... I'll look that up. Thanks.
 
Old 03-13-2012, 05:09 PM   #7
Tinkster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fnguy4545 View Post
I think what I'm reading is that sudo is really what I'm looking for. I want joe, mary and fred to be able to edit cron as an example but no one else... I'll look that up. Thanks.
Again: it depends; do you want them to be able to edit system-cronjobs, or
their own, user specific ones?



Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 03-13-2012, 06:27 PM   #8
jmc1987
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Normally if sudo is setup and anybody in the group %wheel have full admin privileges.

Like if you are running CentOS or possible other RHET based Distros.

# yum -y install sudo
# visudo
Edit the file and uncomment the wheel near the bottom of the page.

Add users to wheel group

# usermod username -a -G wheel

then you can use sudo like this
# sudo command
example: # sudo reboot

Like other said distros like ubuntu have sudo preset up. If you wanted to give a user full root privileges you can change all the system file permissions but I highly advise you not to as this will impose a huge security risk.
 
  


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