LinuxQuestions.org
Help answer threads with 0 replies.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 06-21-2015, 10:22 PM   #1
punchy71
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Posts: 160

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
How and where does an IP address originate from?


Hello,
Just a simple, quick question (I hope)...
How and where does the "ip address" originate from? Is it self-creating or self-assigning somehow?... or possibly tied to hardware or software or both? Does your Internet Service Provider tag it to your location or what?
Thanks
 
Old 06-22-2015, 12:01 AM   #2
mralk3
Member
 
Registered: May 2015
Distribution: Slackware, Debian, CentOS, FreeBSD
Posts: 902

Rep: Reputation: 309Reputation: 309Reputation: 309Reputation: 309
Quote:
Originally Posted by punchy71 View Post
Hello,
Just a simple, quick question (I hope)...
How and where does the "ip address" originate from? Is it self-creating or self-assigning somehow?... or possibly tied to hardware or software or both? Does your Internet Service Provider tag it to your location or what?
Thanks
I will first say that this question could easily have been answered by a quick google search.

I googled, "what is an ip address" and received: https://www.google.com/search?q=what...utf-8&oe=utf-8

With that said, your question is very vague, can be answered in a number of different ways, and includes the broad subject of computer networking. I will try to answer it as simply and concisely as possible.

IP addresses can be assigned as static or dynamic. Static addresses are usually set during installation. Static addresses are usually reserved for servers, routers and other network devices. Dynamic addresses are assigned by a DHCP service on a router or by server running a DHCP service.

Your ISP (Internet Service Provider) has it's own officially assigned address space on the internet, which is assigned by IANA. Within this address space, your ISP has DHCP servers that provide an IP address to each gateway. The gateway your ISP provides is just a router with a built in modem that sometimes has proprietary software authenticating it on the network. This gateway in turn provides it's own DHCP service that assigns an IP address to each networked device on your Local Area Network, or LAN for short. Your computer gets it's IP address from the gateway on your network. How this gateway works, is dependent on if your ISP provides DSL, cable or some other type of internet access technology.

For general information on Linux networking, see: http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/HOWTO-INDEX/networking.html

Wikipedia also has an extensive article covering IP Addresses, here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IP_address
 
Old 06-22-2015, 12:24 AM   #3
Tim Abracadabra
Member
 
Registered: May 2014
Location: USA, Wherever I may Roam
Distribution: Debian w/Xfce, LFS 7.9, ++
Posts: 117

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Hi punchy71,

Basically,
An IP address can be self assigned for private networks, typically from the assigned private address ranges that are not routable on the public internet space. Public IP addresses are managed and delegated out by IANA/ICANN to other entities like ISP's.

More here: http://bfy.tw/S7I

I'd suggest after a bit of reading, post back with any questions you need clarified.

Hope that helps
Tim

Last edited by Tim Abracadabra; 06-22-2015 at 12:28 AM. Reason: Change link and fix typo
 
Old 06-22-2015, 12:39 AM   #4
Tim Abracadabra
Member
 
Registered: May 2014
Location: USA, Wherever I may Roam
Distribution: Debian w/Xfce, LFS 7.9, ++
Posts: 117

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Oops, you beat me to it, mralk3
And actually, adding the DHCP and Gateway explanation makes it a more complete answer!

Last edited by Tim Abracadabra; 06-22-2015 at 01:03 PM. Reason: Typo
 
Old 06-22-2015, 04:08 AM   #5
JeremyBoden
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2011
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 1,187

Rep: Reputation: 243Reputation: 243Reputation: 243
Just to make it a bit more complicated...

Your local devices communicate with your local router at the hardware level by using ARP (Address Resolution Protocol).
This allows your unique burned-in ethernet address to be associated with a software-allocated TCP/IP address.
 
Old 06-22-2015, 03:57 PM   #6
punchy71
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Posts: 160

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeremyBoden View Post
Just to make it a bit more complicated...
No, that doesn't complicate things. Every little bit helps. Thanks.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Which country did Debian/GNU Linux originate in? punchy71 Debian 1 01-31-2014 11:08 AM
[SOLVED] Where does /proc/cpuinfo model name data originate? astrogeek Slackware 3 12-10-2013 01:00 AM
Program to assign globa lIPv6 address and bind() to the previously assigned address. mwnn Linux - Networking 2 10-07-2010 03:29 AM
LXer: Most Computer Attacks Originate in U.S. LXer Syndicated Linux News 2 03-19-2007 07:57 PM
how to get ip address, broadcast address, mac address of a machine sumeshstar Programming 2 03-12-2005 05:33 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:29 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration