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Old 09-05-2005, 06:09 PM   #16
JustTheFax
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Registered: Aug 2005
Location: Arizona
Distribution: Kubuntu
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Quote:
[i](And finish the line with a "Return" before saving it when editing fstab.) [/B]
i understand everything exept this. (probably important)

Edit:
ok i figured that part out,(i'm an idiot) and did the rest of the things that he said i should but when i try to enter hda5 i get:
Code:
Could not enter folder /mnt/win.
suggestions?


It is probabbly becuase i am not root. Kubuntu is wierd like that why am i not root? and why do i always have to type sudo? I don't even know how to become root.

Ok I got it to work!! but i can only do that if i am root and the only way i know to become root is by presing ALT+F2 typing KATE then options then run as a different user and type my root password. is there a way i can access my drive without having to do that the whole time?

Last edited by JustTheFax; 09-05-2005 at 06:35 PM.
 
Old 09-06-2005, 03:07 AM   #17
claudius753
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It's been a while since I needed to access ntfs, but try using this line to allow all to have access:

Code:
/dev/hda5    /mnt/win    ntfs    users,owner,ro,umask=000 0 0
I'm fairly sure this will allow all users read only access to the ntfs partition.

Last edited by claudius753; 09-06-2005 at 03:09 AM.
 
Old 09-06-2005, 05:48 PM   #18
PTrenholme
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Here's how I've got mine set up:
Code:
$ cat /etc/fstab | grep ntfs
/dev/hda1               /mnt/WinXP/c            ntfs    ro,uid=peter,gid=windows  0 0
/dev/hdb1               /mnt/WinXP/d            ntfs    ro,uid=peter,gid=windows  0 0
/dev/hdc1               /mnt/WinXP/g            ntfs    ro,uid=peter,gid=windows  0 0
Note that (as did claudius753) I've set access to ro. That's because (on Fedora, at least) the NTFS access system does not handle the hidden flags that M$ has built in to the (propitary) NTFS. If you write to a NTFS file system without using the Wondows DLL, you can distroy all files on the drive.

See Captive-NTFS (which I've never bothered to get to work for me) if you need write access to your NTFS files.

My solution is to have a FAT32 drive
Code:
/dev/hdg1               /var/share/z            vfat    uid=peter,gid=windows     0 0
that I use to move things between XP and Linux. (For example, I have my Thunderbird mailbox there so my mail is available regardless of the system into which I happen to log on.)

Note also that I've set up a "windows" group for everyone needing access to the NTFS files.

Last edited by PTrenholme; 09-06-2005 at 05:50 PM.
 
Old 09-08-2005, 10:55 PM   #19
JustTheFax
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Thank You everyone for the tremendous help that you most generously gave me. I am looking forward to future threads. (except for when I am having a problem).Thanks again.
 
Old 09-08-2005, 11:30 PM   #20
craigevil
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BTW the easiest way to open a text editor or any program as root in KDE is to type in a terminal kdesu programname, it will then popup a box asking for your password. Enter it and you are now using whatever program as root.


Wow all that just to get into a second drive running XP. When I used to dual boot( I ran ME) all I had to do was right click and choose mount and the drive mounted.

A couple of helpful links:
KUDOS Unofficial Kubuntu FAQ
UserDocumentation - Ubuntu Wiki
Unofficial Ubuntu 5.04 Starter Guide
Debian -- Documentation

Last edited by craigevil; 09-08-2005 at 11:33 PM.
 
Old 09-09-2005, 11:19 AM   #21
sundialsvcs
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One of the things that is most-different about Linux, vs. Windows, is this whole concept of a directory hierarchy and 'mount points.'

In the Windows world, there are "drive letters" like "C:" and "Q:" ... and in more modern versions there's also the concept of \\servername\path_to_file. Each of these separate file domains are independent of one another.

In Linux, however, there is one global hierarchy (my term...) of files and directories, originating at the so-called "root" (not related to the root userid!) which is identified by "/".

To use any filesystem on any disk whatsoever, you mount it, causing that entire filesystem to appear at some point in your computer's global hierarchy. You do this with the mount command. Some mounts will occur automatically at startup time as specified by the /etc/fstab file we've been seeing. Others, you do yourself, but generally only if you are root or if /etc/fstab allows you to. Once mounted, the filesystem remains available until it is unmounted with umount.

The two essential parameters to mount are: (1) the device to be mounted, and (2) the mount point, which initially is an empty-directory. Once the filesystem has been successfully mounted, files magically appear inside that directory.

Linux supports many different types of filesystem drivers. These are kernel modules (loaded on-demand to become part of the kernel), or they can be compiled into the kernel. What they do is to interpret the contents of the disk, fashioning them into "files" and "directories."

Linux drivers are a constant work-in-progress but most of them are very good. Of the various drivers available today, the NTFS driver does have problems, mostly caused by lack of information.

Modern Windows implementations, of course, implement the same concept... what they call "installable file systems" (IFS).

Last edited by sundialsvcs; 09-09-2005 at 11:27 AM.
 
Old 09-24-2005, 03:48 PM   #22
JustTheFax
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Thanks everyone for the sugestions and all the help i finally seem to have this working, still kinda uncerten about the installing but alot of that will, im hoping, come with practice and time.

Now my problems of dual screens and Video Games still exists. If you would be so kind, as you were with my other questions, help me with these two dillemas. thank you in advanced and i would just like to say again how much i appriciate the help.

thanks again.
 
Old 09-24-2005, 05:49 PM   #23
tomj88
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it might be more useful for you ad people who are searching in the future if you start a new post about that problem, just a suggestion
 
Old 09-25-2005, 01:11 AM   #24
JustTheFax
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yeah probably but i didnt want to clutter the forum with threads.

do you think i should for these problems?
 
Old 09-25-2005, 04:45 AM   #25
tomj88
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I would say it clutters the forum's less by keeping individual/unrelated problems in seperate threads as it is easier to find problems for a) people trying to help and b) people with the same problem
 
Old 09-25-2005, 12:22 PM   #26
JustTheFax
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That sounds reasonable. I will post a new thread about one of my new problems in the appropriate category.
 
  


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