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Old 08-12-2006, 12:31 PM   #1
flatstan
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Help please for, setting up/understanding Partitions


I have looked at other similar threads but none really give me an answer.I have Apress book "Beginning SUSE Linux, novice to professional" but that is not much help either.
I have installed Linux SuSe 10.1 on a spare 8G HDD as a trial as an alternative to Windows, I have played for a while. I like it & now wish to install it on to a 80G HDD and learn to use it properly as my main system.
On the 8G, fdisk reports that the HD is split into 3 partitions, hda1 12%,hda2 39%,hda3 48%.
My understanding is -
hda1 contains the swap file,
hda2 contains the system files & boots from this partition.
hda3 contains what ?
In which partitions are all the various folders listed in the file system ie home, usr, bin, etc etc housed.
When additional programs are installed, in which partitions are they installed to.
I like to use a file sharing program ie eDonkey. On my new
80 HDD I would like to install & use this on a separate partition, I would also like to have a separate partition to use as storage for items, that I do not plan to use for a while, or until I decide what to do with them.
I presume that if I install SuSe on the 80G, accepting the default options, which as a newbie is the surest way of not making mistakes, I will get 3 Partitions as I did (or similar) on my 8G.
How do I make and size the 2 extra partitions that I would like, when installing SuSe on the 80G. I am comfortable with partitioning etc with fdisk on DOS.
Please correct me if my assumptions/understanding is wrong.
Regards.
 
Old 08-12-2006, 01:13 PM   #2
soggycornflake
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Quote:
hda3 contains what ?
df or mount will tell you what is mounted there (I'd guess /home).

Quote:
In which partitions are all the various folders listed in the file system ie home, usr, bin, etc etc housed.
Most directories are not on a seperate partition. Again, df will tell you what is mounted. Any directory that isn't a seperate mount point is just a normal directory, which will be on whatever partition it's topmost mount point is at. So, if /home is on hda3, then /home/flatstan will also be on hda3. If / is on hda2, then all directories under / that are not themselves mounted partitions will also be on hda2.

For example, my df output is (this is an 80GB drive):

Code:
/dev/hda6               192736    135712     57024  71% /
/dev/hda7               256996    103180    153816  41% /var
/dev/hda8               132206     36346     89034  29% /tmp
/dev/hda9              7823376   3197876   4625500  41% /usr
/dev/hda10            61719808  14347688  47372120  24% /data
So, /var, /tmp, /usr and /data have their own partition (note that I have combined /home and /usr/local onto /data). Thus, all other directories under / (except for the virtual filesystems /proc, /sys, /dev/pts etc), are on the / partition, hda6.

Quote:
When additional programs are installed, in which partitions are they installed to.
It's important to understand that on unix the actual hardware is abstracted away. Unlike other operating systems, which view different drives/partitions as different devices, unix combines all physical drives into a single logical tree starting at / (call "root", and not to be confused with /root, the super user's home directory).

When you install programs, the various parts will go into the relevant directories. So, binaries might go in /usr/bin, libraries in /usr/lib, configuration files in /etc, documentation under /usr/share/doc/<package name> and so on. The fact the /usr, /var etc might be on different partitions is totally irrelevant as far as normal usage is concerned.

Quote:
I like to use a file sharing program ie eDonkey. On my new
80 HDD I would like to install & use this on a separate partition, I would also like to have a separate partition to use as storage for items, that I do not plan to use for a while, or until I decide what to do with them.
I presume that if I install SuSe on the 80G, accepting the default options, which as a newbie is the surest way of not making mistakes, I will get 3 Partitions as I did (or similar) on my 8G.
I don't know much about SUSE but most auto partitioning utils will use the whole drive by default. You can change the number of partitions and sizes during installation (there is usually an "advanced" or "expert" mode to do this). Alternatively, you could switch to another console and run fdisk/cfdisk, then tell yast to leave the partitions alone.

Last edited by soggycornflake; 08-12-2006 at 01:22 PM.
 
Old 08-12-2006, 01:19 PM   #3
weibullguy
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You can issue this command from a console
Code:
clark@clark:~$ mount -l
/dev/hda3 on / type ext3 (rw,errors=remount-ro) [/]
/dev/hda1 on /boot type ext3 (rw) [/boot]
/dev/hda5 on /home type ext3 (rw) [/home]
/dev/hdc on /media/cdrom0 type iso9660 (ro,noexec,nosuid,nodev)
This will tell you where /dev/hda3 is mounted (note this is only a partial output). You can also look at /etc/fstab to see which partition is mounted where. Now that you know the hda3 mount point you can
Code:
clark@clark:~$ ls -l /home
total 52
drwxrwxrwx 27 clark clark  4096 2006-08-08 21:24 clark
drwxr-xr-x  2 root  root  49152 2006-07-16 12:07 lost+found
Which will show you what is on that partition.

Why don't you use the 80GB to install SuSE and accept it's default partitioning then split the 8GB drive into two partitions? One for the eDonkey stuff and one for the storage of little used stuff. Otherwise you'll need to manually partition the 80GB drive when installing SuSE. I assume SuSE gives you the option during the installation program? I'm sure it will be self-evident from the installation program how to do it.

There are several programs that you could use to partition the 80GB drive before you begin. I'm partial to fdisk. Open a console and
Code:
clark@clark:~$ fdisk /dev/hda
Once you're in the program, type m for help.
 
Old 08-13-2006, 07:02 AM   #4
flatstan
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Location: London UK.
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Partitions

Great, thanks very much for a very usefull/clear answer, I have a better idea of what to do now. thanks for your time. Regards John.
 
  


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