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Old 09-30-2007, 09:11 AM   #1
drango9801
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I am new to Linux and I need some help. Could someone tell me about Linux Multi User Support and Device Management. What they are and how are they used in Linux?
 
Old 09-30-2007, 09:17 AM   #2
dafunks
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Posting the same question in multiple forums possibly isn't the quickest way to get help :/
 
Old 09-30-2007, 01:51 PM   #3
pixellany
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Homework, n'est-ce pas?
Tell us about about your course of study, what books they have assigned, etc.
"Multi-user support" means support of multiple users
"Device management" means management of devices

You may want to make your questions more specific...
 
Old 10-01-2007, 05:35 AM   #4
drango9801
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Well we are doing an oral presentation and I have been researching it online to get a summary of both but could not find it, especially multi user support for Linux. If you could give me a website that might give me a good summary on it, I would appreciat it. Thanks for your help.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany View Post
Homework, n'est-ce pas?
Tell us about about your course of study, what books they have assigned, etc.
"Multi-user support" means support of multiple users
"Device management" means management of devices

You may want to make your questions more specific...
 
Old 10-01-2007, 02:05 PM   #5
pixellany
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Linux builds on the Unix tradition of being a true multi-user system. If you have set up a Linux system, then you know how this works.

One thing to search for would be the Posix standard. I'm sure there is something there on what "multi-user" is supposed to mean.

You didn't say what text you are using in the course.
 
Old 10-03-2007, 03:15 AM   #6
b0uncer
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Another thing worth taking a look at is probably how UNIX was developed (there are several different kinds of operating systems of those, but pick one of them), what ideas it was based on etc. After all Linux was "made out of it", and resembles it a lot - Posix standard has a lot to do with this. If you can't seem to find any documentation about those things and Linux, you could try to search for what there is about Unix, and then think how much it's the same, or how it differs, in Linux -- it's not much.
 
  


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