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-   -   Having trouble locating file. Used FIND (file) ... should be simple (https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/having-trouble-locating-file-used-find-file-should-be-simple-881893/)

Hevithan 05-21-2011 12:16 AM

Having trouble locating file. Used FIND (file) ... should be simple
 
I feel like a total doof ... Because this is a simple question, and right in the front of my brain the answer is floating ... But I just can't catch it.

I downloaded a gaming editor called BYOND. I unzipped, did CD to it's location, I ran Make, ./config, then make install ... Now I can't seem to locate the actual file.

I tried to use FIND and I only got:

Code:

./byond
./byond/bin
./byond/bin/libext.so
./byond/bin/DreamDownload
./byond/bin/DreamDaemon
./byond/bin/DreamMaker
./byond/bin/libbyond.so
./byond/readme.txt
./byond/cfg

This doesn't tell me what comes before /byond.

I'd love some help cause I'm pretty bored :-P, Thanks guys.

corp769 05-21-2011 12:23 AM

Hello,

First and foremost, I noticed that the order of the commands you listed are out of order; They should be as follows:
Code:

./configure
make
make check  (optional)
make install  (as root)

Now besides that, find searches recursively, but not backwards. If anything, you would have to search from root ( / ) to be able to search through all directories on your system. Lastly, when you do a "make install," you should have gotten output where the files have been installed to. You should be able to look in your output history in your shell and see where exactly the files were place.

Hope that helps man!

Cheers,

Josh

Hevithan 05-21-2011 12:26 AM

Didn't even occur to me to check the output history. I'm gonna give that a shot.

EricTRA 05-21-2011 12:27 AM

Hello,

What is the actual file you're looking for? The binary that was created when you ran make install to finish the compilation process? If so and if the compilation went OK then you should be able to locate the file with
Code:

which byond
if that is the name of the editor. Or did I misunderstand you?

Kind regards,

Eric

corp769 05-21-2011 12:27 AM

Hello,

Ok cool. Let me know if you make any ground or not :p

Cheers,

Josh

Hevithan 05-21-2011 12:30 AM

usr/local/share/byond


Thanks corp

corp769 05-21-2011 12:33 AM

Hello,

No problem man, anytime! Mark your thread as solved if you can, and give rep if applicable, thanks!

Cheers,

Josh

Hevithan 05-21-2011 12:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EricTRA (Post 4362503)
Hello,

What is the actual file you're looking for? The binary that was created when you ran make install to finish the compilation process? If so and if the compilation went OK then you should be able to locate the file with
Code:

which byond
if that is the name of the editor. Or did I misunderstand you?

Kind regards,

Eric

Yes I was looking for the binary, and it is an editor named BYOND ... You understood fine. I found the directory using corp's method, But when I do which byond I get nothing, it just goes back to
Code:

me@here:$

EricTRA 05-21-2011 12:43 AM

Hi,

Glad you had it solved. The which command might fail when you don't have the path to the binary in your path statement, if you run it with sudo it might just work. Anyway, good job. Have fun with Linux.

Kind regards,

Eric

corp769 05-21-2011 12:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hevithan (Post 4362513)
Yes I was looking for the binary, and it is an editor named BYOND ... You understood fine. I found the directory using corp's method, But when I do which byond I get nothing, it just goes back to
Code:

me@here:$

To also add what Eric just said.... Could you give us the output of the following:
Code:

echo $PATH
The which command, like Eric said, looks in your path for the directories to look in. I'm just curious what all is in your path, that is all. And to think about it, also give the output when given with root privileges, that just might be the issue, like Eric said. Damn you Eric, you stole my thunder.

EricTRA 05-21-2011 12:50 AM

ThunderStruck, nana na nana

LOL

honeybadger 05-21-2011 01:08 AM

Just adding to something that has been resolved :). Did you kniw there was a 'locate <filename>' command? All you have to do is run 'updatedb' as root which will index all the files. Personally I prefer using locate to find.
Hope this helps.

corp769 05-21-2011 01:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SilverBack (Post 4362522)
Just adding to something that has been resolved :). Did you kniw there was a 'locate <filename>' command? All you have to do is run 'updatedb' as root which will index all the files. Personally I prefer using locate to find.
Hope this helps.

Yes, but with find, you can search on the fly. With locate, it is very useful, which I use myself, but you need to run updatedb if not scheduled by cron.

Hevithan 05-21-2011 01:36 AM

Here's what I get with echo:

Code:

hevithan@Lifebook:~$ echo $PATH
/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/games

and

Code:

root@Lifebook:~# echo $PATH
/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin

Was I supposed to put a directory where you wrote path (cause I just assumed that was the whole command)?

and:

Code:

root@Lifebook:~# locate byond
-su: locate: command not found

I ran locate through SU -L ... Should I login as root or should su be doing it?

corp769 05-21-2011 01:46 AM

I always switch to root by using "su -" personally. Besides that, if anything, you might have to install locate/updatedb. What distro are you running?


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