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-   -   GUI for altering monitor gamma/grey tones/colour temp? (https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/gui-for-altering-monitor-gamma-grey-tones-colour-temp-4175590605/)

EssCee 10-02-2016 10:55 AM

GUI for altering monitor gamma/grey tones/colour temp?
 
Hi folks.

I edit photos. To help with this, I alter settings on my screen - in Windows 7 I used a display calibration wizard that allowed adjustment of gamma settings and RGB colour mix. I also used the freeware program QuickGamma.
Both of these were exactly the right program I needed, and GUI-based.
I do not have a hardware colourimeter 8and it'll be a while before I get one).

I am trying to find the same sort of program for Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon.
In Preferences -> Colour, the 'calibrate' button is always greyed out.
research has turned up references to 'lprof' and 'monica' - however, both of these appear to be outdated - no new updates to either since 2013, I think.

Can anyone recommend an appropriate application?

Cheers.

EDIT: I'm using a laptop - not the best for photography editing I know, but my only option at the mo'...

John VV 10-02-2016 04:33 PM

if you really need to calibrate the screen
you need a separate tool that attaches to the screen

then you can use a standard sRGB.icm or AdobeRGB1998.icc for gimp your printer and the screen

i use KDE and the Nvidia driver software

if you can not buy the tool you can use a trial and error approach
you will NEED!!!! a photographic color chart ( very common in photo studios and labs )
something like this
-- this is ONLY the very FIRST google hit and i KNOW they are cheaper
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/con...C&A=details&Q=

scan it to a ppm image
use the chart in your hand and match the screen
-- in the desktop and in gimp
also MAKE sure the color profiles are installed and being used

then the printer also needs correcting to get a print to match the real card in your hand

AwesomeMachine 10-02-2016 07:19 PM

ArgyllCMS allows the use of color profiles for color tuning monitors and printers. kgamma in KDE system settings is a GUI gamma control.

ondoho 10-03-2016 01:38 AM

tricky, getting it right.
if you get it right for your monitor, it might look completely wrong on another monitor.
if you publish your photos digitally, the amount of different monitors is uncountable.
if you print them out, you have to get it right again for the printer, the paper it's printed on and so on.

i understand there are attempts at generalized software solutions.
iirc, gnome/gtk3 is using something by default, so:
Quote:

Originally Posted by EssCee (Post 5612761)
In Preferences -> Colour, the 'calibrate' button is always greyed out.

maybe you have to
a) install the software that is "behind" that button
b) use a different DE
?

EssCee 10-03-2016 03:53 PM

Hi, and thanks.

John VV and Awesome Machine: My Linux is Cinnamon, which is GTK+ 3, and as I understand it, this means KDE apps will not run, or at least not run properly. And Argyll seems to need a hardware device, which I don't have and wont be getting anytime soon, sadly. No money being spent at the moment.

Ondoho: Yep tricky, I know. The way I look at it is, I have no control over other monitors, just my own. So I want to make my own calibrated and consistent, so I know that the edit is right. This is why I seek a simple GUI-based app, like the one in Win7, and like QuickGamma, and those two I mentioned which existed for earlier versions of Linux. Any suggestions as to what should be behind the button, and what's 'DE'?

Cheers, folks.

EssCee 10-03-2016 03:53 PM

abc

John VV 10-03-2016 05:17 PM

see if "xcalib" is in your repos

but if you really need to calibrate

look at spyder5
http://spyder.datacolor.com/display-calibration/

frankbell 10-03-2016 08:56 PM

Most of my monitors have had their own settings accessed by a menu button in the monitor controls. I've found that to very useful.

This applies to stand-alone monitors, not to laptop/tablet screens.

keefaz 10-04-2016 03:45 AM

You can try find a profile here
http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/articles/icc_profiles.htm
Then use xcalib to load it

ondoho 10-05-2016 01:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EssCee (Post 5613370)
, and what's 'DE'?

sorry about that.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deskto..._Window_System

also, i had a quick look at what gnome is using for color management, i'm pretty sure it's this:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux_...agement#Colord
(and maybe an interesting article overall)

dave@burn-it.co.uk 10-05-2016 10:12 AM

Are these not a function of your graphics drivers? I would expect them to have a utility to do this as well as the OS ones.

ondoho 10-06-2016 01:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dave@burn-it.co.uk (Post 5614217)
Are these not a function of your graphics drivers? I would expect them to have a utility to do this as well as the OS ones.

you're missing the point.
from the wikipedia article i linked:
Quote:

Linux color management has the same goal as the color management systems (CMS) for other operating systems: to achieve the best possible color reproduction throughout an imaging workflow from its source (camera, video, scanner, etc.), through imaging software (CinePaint, Digikam, GIMP, Krita, Scribus, etc.), and finally onto an output medium (monitor, video projector, printer, etc.). In particular, color management attempts to support WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) on-screen previewing (soft-proofing) ability for color work such as retouching prior to printing. Note that in practice, best is determined according to some algorithm and may not correspond well to what a human eye would consider best.

dave@burn-it.co.uk 10-06-2016 02:59 PM

No I am not.
It is called the colour profile of devices and one of the functions of graphics drivers is to help you match your monitor's display and card to what is considered the standard.

You can also do the same with colour printers, but it takes a lot more effort and uses a lot of colour ink.
Anyone using a high quality printer to print photographs should really do this so what they see on the screen is what gets printed.

EssCee 10-07-2016 06:33 AM

Hi Folks,


Thanks for your answers.

All good information, for when I will dig into the subject in detail.
However, at this moment, all I am seeking is a GUI-based application, similar to QuickGamma on Windows, or to the older apps 'Monica' and 'LPROF', if anyone knows of a current equivalent.
I simply wish to do a quick adjustment by eye of colour balance and gamma using an application specifically for that purpose.
It's a laptop, so the only hardware control is a brightness control.

Cheers,
Stuart

keefaz 10-07-2016 10:08 AM

Could you post output with /sbin/lspci | grep -i vga ?


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