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Old 01-03-2007, 04:22 PM   #1
r_sherman
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going back to windows after trying out linux..


would like to know some things bfore i try linux.

I am running windows xp on my C: partition. with ntfs file system.

Now if i install linux on D: partition, i believe it will be formatted into linux file system which is ext3(if im not wrong)

Then, after using linux and windows for some time by dual booting, i choose not to use linux anymore.

then i would need to make the D: partition into NTFS so that i can continue using that partition as a part of windows, just like old times. but without losing the data on it.

i see two options here
1. login to windows, copy all the data in D: to any other parition which is in NTFS. then format the D partition to ntfs.
2. convert the D partition to NTFS without losing data.

are any or both of the two options possible? if yes, can u please tell me what programs are to be used.

any help will be really appreciated.
just trying to know these things bfore giving linux a shot

thank u
 
Old 01-03-2007, 04:36 PM   #2
farslayer
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you cannot convert from ext3 to ntfs without removing and recreating the partition. so option 2 is definitely out.

if you wish to install linux on your existing hard drive you will need to delete the partition that is d: drive and leave it as free space.

You would then boot from your Linux install CD and install to that free space. During install there will be at least 2 new partitions created one for the Linux Operating system and one for SWAP (Virtual memory in MS Speak)

Linux can mount and write to NTFS, so you could copy data from the Linux drive to the NTFS drive if you wish (see ntfs-3g) or alternately you could create an additional partition on the Hard drive as FAT32 which can be mounted in both windows and linux, making it rather convenient to shuffle data back and forth between the two operating systems on the PC no matter which OS you are running at the time.. That would be my recommendation.

Hard Drive 1 - 80 GB
35 GB NTFS partition for Windows (known as the C: drive)
10 GB FAT32 for data storage in windows and Linux
34 GB EXT3 Partition for Linux (known as mount point /)
1 GB Partition for SWAP space (512MB would be fine as well..)

if you decide to remove Linux at a later date you can simply delete the partitions it was installed on and if you installed the Linux bootloader to the MBR of the Hard Drive (recommended) you can boot from the Windows XP CD enter the recovery console and use fixmbr to allow windows to boot directly again without using the Linux boot loader.
 
Old 01-03-2007, 04:53 PM   #3
camorri
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Quote:
Now if i install linux on D: partition, i believe it will be formatted into linux file system which is ext3(if im not wrong)
Linux uses different ways of identifying partitions. C in windows would be 'hda1' in linux speak. D would be hda2, if you make it a primary partition with what ever partitioning tool you use. If you make it extended, it would be hda5. So, to understand the linux language, the hd stands for harddrive, no surprise there. The 'a' part is the first physical ( primary) hard drive installed on an IDE controller. The '1' part is the partition number.

File systems, ext3 is a linux supported file system, there are many more that linux supports. As the system administrator you can select and format a new partition to any supported linux file system.

Quote:
then i would need to make the D: partition into NTFS so that i can continue using that partition as a part of windows, just like old times. but without losing the data on it.
Windoze doesn't have the ability to do this to an ext3 file system. The only file system that both linux and windbloze can use is FAT32 FAT16 and FAT12. Both can read and write to them. I have never tried to install linux to a fat32 system, although I would bet it could be done. I would not recommend it at all. FAT32 is not stable enough, and can not recover form various disk errors that any system can experience.

Quote:
1. login to windows, copy all the data in D: to any other parition which is in NTFS. then format the D partition to ntfs..
This can only work if the partition is fat. Will not work for ext3. If it is a ext3 partition, you would have to delete the partition, re-create the partition and format to NTFS, all data would be destroyed.

Quote:
2. convert the D partition to NTFS without losing data.
Nope, won't work. Forget it.

If you are determined to do this, you would need to copy the user data to another partition readable by both systems, or to a CD or DVD. Then restore the user data using windoze after you format this area to NTFS.
 
Old 01-03-2007, 09:56 PM   #4
rbees
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I have a utillity installed in xp that allows me to write to my linux drives and so if you were to decide to stop using linux you can still access that drive space to copy files out of it befor reformating it. As I recall deleting file created for root only write access can't be deleted from whithin windows. I don't recall what the name of this utillity is and I can't tell from in linux. But it should be easy enough to fine via google.

Hope this helps.
 
Old 01-04-2007, 02:30 AM   #5
PatrickNew
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ext2ifs is the name of the utility. Works like a charm.
 
Old 01-04-2007, 03:27 PM   #6
r_sherman
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thanks a lot friends
i got it

will try out linux some time soon.
thanks for the help
 
  


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