LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 12-27-2013, 01:55 AM   #1
Arjun
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2011
Posts: 120
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 0
from where to start


I am a beginner in linux. Currently i run linux through my usb. But i am thinking to remove windows & install linux onto my harddisk. So, i want your suggestion which linux distro to select.

I want all the things can be done easily as in windows like internet without drivers, cam, bluetooth,wifi,etc.

There mucst be all the software in linux as i use in windows like ms office, notepad++,etc.

Some friends suggested me of following distros

- Redhat
- Fedora
- Slackware
- Backtrack
- Ubuntu

So, as for a beginner, which one to select ?

Thanks
 
Old 12-27-2013, 02:16 AM   #2
divyashree
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Location: bbsr,orissa,India
Distribution: RHEL5 ,RHEL4,CENT OS5,FEDORA,UBUNTU
Posts: 1,363

Rep: Reputation: 135Reputation: 135
Hi Arjun,Welcome to LQ.

As a new user you can start with any linux, but better install the latest version.

In Ubuntu,fedora there are a lot of prebuilt tools available.

Redhat is also fine, but as its meant for enterprise use only,you have to struggle a lot initially to use all kind tools.

In any of the linux in the list, you can use internet.

The drivers are builtin the linux kernel. So you dont have to worry about the dirvers.

There are a lot of popular opensource alternatives available for those MS products.

You can use Libreoffice instead of ms office, bluefish instead of notepad++.

Last edited by divyashree; 12-27-2013 at 02:20 AM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-27-2013, 02:21 AM   #3
Arjun
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2011
Posts: 120
Blog Entries: 2

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thanks for the reply. So, in the above list can you suggest the distro ?

Any image burn software for linux?
 
Old 12-27-2013, 02:30 AM   #4
divyashree
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Location: bbsr,orissa,India
Distribution: RHEL5 ,RHEL4,CENT OS5,FEDORA,UBUNTU
Posts: 1,363

Rep: Reputation: 135Reputation: 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjun View Post
Thanks for the reply. So, in the above list can you suggest the distro ?

Any image burn software for linux?
I am using Ubuntu 12 in my laptop and work with it on daily basis, but its a debian variant. You can also use Fedora also which is a rpm variant. Its not stable but you can do a lot of research in it as you will get a lots of tools in it.

So you may use anyone. But if you are having dual graphics card, you have to struggle with the graphics driver with any of the distro if you use laptop.

yes k3b is a popular tool. You can use it for image burning or any kind of cd/dvd operation. It is opensource can be installed in any distro.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-27-2013, 04:55 AM   #5
Germany_chris
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2011
Location: Stuttgart, Germany
Distribution: Arch
Posts: 1,027

Rep: Reputation: 482Reputation: 482Reputation: 482Reputation: 482Reputation: 482
I prefer yum to apt so I voted Fedora but really the distro will choose you.
 
Old 12-27-2013, 08:18 PM   #6
Knightron
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2011
Location: Australia
Distribution: OpenSUSE
Posts: 1,396
Blog Entries: 7

Rep: Reputation: 166Reputation: 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjun View Post
I am a beginner in linux. Currently i run linux through my usb. But i am thinking to remove windows & install linux onto my harddisk. So, i want your suggestion which linux distro to select.

I want all the things can be done easily as in windows like internet without drivers, cam, bluetooth,wifi,etc.

There mucst be all the software in linux as i use in windows like ms office, notepad++,etc.

Some friends suggested me of following distros

- Redhat
- Fedora
- Slackware
- Backtrack
- Ubuntu

So, as for a beginner, which one to select ?

Thanks
First of all, backtrack which is now known as kali Linux is a terrible choice for a noob. If you're friends have recommended that, then i wouldn't take what they say too seriously, they're noobs too, whom likely want to appear more knowledgeable than they really are - boost their egos.

All the things you listed you'd like to be able to do on Gnu/Linux, are you able to do them off your distro you booted off the usb? If you are, then you'll likely be able to do them on a hard drive install too. The things you listed all looked like things that are simple to do.
You listed you'd like to use a few programs which are native to Windows, "ms office, notepad++,etc". These programs are not available natively to Gnu/Linux. I highly suggest you use a Gnu/Linux alternative, such as LibreOffice instead of Microsoft Office, and Kwrite instead of Notepad (in fact there is so many notepad alternatives which are very good, it would be silly to use Notepad.).
If you insist on running Microsoft Office, you can install a program called 'Wine' which is a compatibility layer that gives a user the ability to run many Windows programs within Gnu/Linux.

As for which distro.
I've already said Backtrack is a terrible choice.
Redhat Enterprise Linux is a distribution designed for workplace use. It is rock solid, but a user will have to add third party repos to get many multimedia applications that usually users want. Redhat Enterprise Linux is also not free as in price. You need to pay money to run Redhat Enterprise Linux, so it wouldn't be a great option for you either.
Slackware is a great distro (my favorite), but it will not hold your hand. You need to read the documentation if you want to run this distro. It has a great philosophy behind it, but the philosophy makes some things a little harder to do than on other distros. Slackware gets a reputation for being hard to use, but i think that, that reputation is exaggerated. It is a fine choice and some noobs can handle it at first, but typically i don't suggest it to noobs.
Fedora is the distribution which is the core of Redhat Enterprise Linux. In other words, programs are tested in Fedora before they are deemed worthy of Redhats enterprise distribution. Fedora delivers a much more up to date experience than Redhat, and Slackware, but that means it will have bugs occasionally. While Fedora is a Enterprise supported and funded distro (i think funded), it is very community built and orientated; the community is also very helpful. Fedora does deliver better multimedia support than Redhat; but their focus on Free software is very strict and you will still need to add some third party (but often used) repos to get it to work the way you likely want it to.
Ubuntu is a nooby focused distro. They put special effort to deliver an up to date experience, and are comparable to Fedora in that way. Ubuntu often has bugs too. Ubuntu is a distro created and managed by a company named Canonical. Many new uses are very happy with Ubuntu; of the distros you mentioned, i would recommend this one.

As an additional note, there are certain pieces of software, that simply can not be shipped with any distro because it is illegal to possess them in certain states/countries. You will have to use a third party repo or grab the necessary packages from somewhere else if you desire to use these pieces of software.
Don't worry though, this is usually very easy.


Anyway, that's all the distros you mentioned covered. Personally i don't recommend any of them to you though. Try Opensuse, it's very stable, offers very new software, but not so new, it's full of bugs. It has a very good package manager, and a great system management tool, which is unique and not available in any other community distro.
The community is very helpful, and with it's system management tool, Yast, a nooby should find it a breeze to use.

If you have any other questions, feel free to ask, a good idea is to read up on all the desktop environments before you install, so you can work out which one you'd like to try first. Gnu/Linux has many desktop environments available, unlike Windows, and it can be difficult for a noob to decide which one to go with first, when they haven't tried any. It's a very personal thing, and you'll have to try each one before you can decide which one really suites your taste. Since you can only do one at a time, i suggest trying Xfce or Kde on your first install, since these two desktop environments offer a more conventional approach, while still offering many features. Kde is my fav DE by the way.

Good luck.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-27-2013, 08:51 PM   #7
frankbell
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Virginia, USA
Distribution: Slackware, Debian, Mageia, and whatever VMs I happen to be playing with
Posts: 12,885
Blog Entries: 18

Rep: Reputation: 3346Reputation: 3346Reputation: 3346Reputation: 3346Reputation: 3346Reputation: 3346Reputation: 3346Reputation: 3346Reputation: 3346Reputation: 3346Reputation: 3346
Most Linux distro come with CD/DVD burning programs installed. If one is not there, you can easily install one; my particular favorite is K3B, which is part of the KDE desktop environment, but there are others, as well as command-line burning tools also.

Most of them also include LibreOffice, a powerful and full-featured office suite. There are other office suites, but LibreOffice is the predominant one. Again, if it's not there after the initial installation, it can be easily obtained.

The major Linux GUI text editors (kate, gnome-editor, kwrite) offer features similar or superior to notepad++. Command text editors are also very powerful, far moreso than any command line editors available in the DOS/Windows world.

What you won't be able to do is run Windows software directly in Linux--the operating environments are quite different. You can make some Windows software work in Linux using Wine, but I recommend learning and using native Linux tools rather instead of spending time doing that.

For starts, any mainline desktop distro should work fine. I'd recommend you burn Live CDs of the ones you are interested in, boot to them, then choose the one that feels best to you. Note that a Live CD, which runs entirely in RAM, will be inherently slower than an OS installed to the HDD.

I would recommend against RHEL or CentOS. Though they can be used as desktop operating systems, they are designed primarily as server software. You might take a look at Mint, Mageia, and OpenSuse. If you really want to learn how Linux works, also look at Slackware.

Last edited by frankbell; 12-27-2013 at 08:54 PM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-27-2013, 08:57 PM   #8
Ztcoracat
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 7,965
Blog Entries: 13

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Hi:

Quote:
So, as for a beginner, which one to select ?
I suggest Debian or Opensuse:-

http://www.debian.org/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sA6dR_feBws

http://www.opensuse.org/en/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YzUlniBucjk

Fedora is nice and cutting edge but Fedora does not work right out of the box.
You will have to install "Flash" and learn 'Yum' (commandline utility)

Red Hat: RHEL is a paid subscription. Like Knightron said mostly used for workplace or running a business.

When I was new to Linux 4 years ago even Ubuntu was hard for me until I read the "Ubuntu Linux Bible"
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyT...470038993.html

Which ever distribution that you decide to install it will help if you read the documentation that pertains to it.

Good luck to you; Arjun!
Cheers
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-28-2013, 08:00 AM   #9
Arjun
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2011
Posts: 120
Blog Entries: 2

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thanks @Knightron for very detailed & nice information. I really enjoyed while reading your post.

Ok, i am thinking to try ubuntu for now. Nobody till now suggest me of Opensuse. Well, i will first try this too through my USB drive.

Thank you very much for your time.

Thanks @frankbell for the reply & nice information. I am not asking windows software here. I was asking for the linux softwares similar to windows. As far as wine is considered, many friends tells that its full of bugs. Not all windows softwares runs on wine.

I was asking for notepad++, since i do programming & notepad++ provides good features to programmers. So, any similar software for linux will good.

Its too bad to search for dependencies in linux like flash or media. So, are RHEL or CentOS good ?

Thanks @Ztcoracat for suggestion & for your time.I tried to use Debian or Opensuse via my USB drive to check if they contains all the features i want through unetbootin but both didnt ran through my USB. So, i dont want to install them directly to my hard drive.
 
Old 12-28-2013, 09:22 AM   #10
lemon09
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2009
Location: kolkata,India
Distribution: Mandriva,openSuse,Mint,Debian
Posts: 285
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 37
Firstly, such questions have been answered a lot of times before in LQ previously. My suggestions would be to read those topics first. It will always help you.

Next, the most important thing is that Linux and Windows are two different operating systems, different in all respects. They differ in principles, proprietorship and many more. So you can't expect Linux to be same as windows. Though there exist many Distro that is specifically geared towards users planning to switch to Linux from Windows.

I must admit that in order to understand Linux you have to think in terms of Linux - about how it works and what all are its philosophies which I think most of the users will admit. Microsoft office, the package that you mentioned belongs to Microsoft and you cannot expect it to be ported to Linux. You can however use the wine application to run those office applications on your Linux machine but there are some visual problems which you might face (at least that is what I feel).

Now, about the distros. For Backtrack Linux which you mentioned is not at all for the beginners and for that one I would completely agree with Knightron. It is specifically geared towards hacking purpose. Debian is a nice distribution and is very stable. Fedora is fine for developers but then it is not so stable compared to its parent, the Red Hat and also Debian. For beginners I would suggest Linux Mint or Ubuntu. Ubuntu however has lost many of its fans recently since the introduction of unity. openSuse is also a good distribution but some times it might get slower.

For your programming part I would suggest kwrite which is far better than notepad++. You might want to try it out yourself and find it out. For the internet, well you might have some problem. Again, if things turn out fine you will find it easier than windows but if it isn't you might have to work hard on it. Now configuring the internet is the major thing you need to do because if that it is right you might probably never get back to windows. Generally wired connections are installed without any hassle.

Finally, you will definitely have problem with any linux distro in the beginning however user friendly that claim to be.

So my advice would be to make a dual boot and go around Linux for some time. Then decide on it.

Good Luck buddy.....
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-28-2013, 11:48 PM   #11
Knightron
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2011
Location: Australia
Distribution: OpenSUSE
Posts: 1,396
Blog Entries: 7

Rep: Reputation: 166Reputation: 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjun View Post
Thanks @Knightron for very detailed & nice information. I really enjoyed while reading your post.
Glad you enjoyed it, i hope it was informative.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjun View Post
As far as wine is considered, many friends tells that its full of bugs. Not all windows softwares runs on wine.
Wine does have many bugs, however, many programs, especially games run very well as well. Some of the bugs are trivial things, for example, i enjoy the game Diable 1. I have it installed through wine. The menus do not show up at the start. If i press 'enter' blindly continuously, it will load into my saved game and once loaded, the actual game runs flawlessly. Little bugs like this are the things you can expect from wine occasionally.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjun View Post
Its too bad to search for dependencies in linux like flash or media. So, are RHEL or CentOS good ?
You should not have to find dependencies manually like that in most distros. Installing flash is easy on most distros. On Debian, it's a matter of adding 'non-free' to the end of the Main repo in the /etc/apt/sources.list.
In Opensuse i think it's in the Main repo, but if it's not, adding the pacman repo will fix you up easily.
And other distros are much the same.
The third party repos are built to work with the main repos of foo distro, so you normally do not have to search for the dependencies because apt/yum/zypper all have the abilities to work with multiple repos and pull in dependencies from one or the other.
apt is Debians and Ubuntus package manager; yum is Redhat's, CentOS's and Fedora's package manager, and Zypper is Opensuse's.
Redhat and CentOS are basically the same thing, except you have to pay money for Redhat. They are both very good distros, but they focus on stability and reliability, so they can be used in a workplace, for office stuff or server stuff.
There focus on stability means it takes a long time to make a release, because every peice of software goes through immense testing. While this makes a rock solid experience, a lot of the software becomes very old during this period. For example, the current version of CentOS has kde 4.3.4 in their repos, but the most recent version of kde is 4.12.0. There is a huge difference between those releases.
That is the main reason they're not used often on home computers. As a side note though, i will add that despite the old kernel, i have found that the hardware support delivered by CentOS and Redhat is very good.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjun View Post
Thanks @Ztcoracat for suggestion & for your time.I tried to use Debian or Opensuse via my USB drive to check if they contains all the features i want through unetbootin but both didnt ran through my USB. So, i dont want to install them directly to my hard drive.
Unetbootin is a way of making a iso boot off a usb rather than a dvd, so someone can install a disto on a computer without a cdrom. I don't know if the live function of some isos is supported, but i'm going to assume they are.
Debian does not come as a live addition by default, so it would not have booted like a live Cd, which is what you're attempting to do.
If you used the Opensuse dvd iso instead of one of the live desktop environment additions, then you're going to have the same problem as above.
That is likely why Debian and Opensuse didn't work.

Debian Live may be of interest to you.
From here:
http://live.debian.net/cdimage/relea...64/iso-hybrid/
Below is the download link to 64 bit version of Debian with the Gnome desktop. I provided the Gnome desktop link because that's Debians default, but i still recommend kde or xfce, which there is a version in the web address above.
Debian Live 64bit - Gnome

I would like to also provide a download link for the live cds of Opensuse, but Opensuse has some fancy complecated crap going on, on their website, and i can't find the web address to the actual download.
Here is where you can and likely already have downloaded Opensuse http://software.opensuse.org/131/en If you scroll down, there are live versions instead of the dvd, you might like to try one of them, if you previously used the dvd version.


Quote:
Originally Posted by lemon09 View Post
openSuse is also a good distribution but some times it might get slower.
Slower?? Slower than what?
Ignoring malware, and addware, Windows gets slow over time due to the design of fat32 and ntfs. Any Gnu/Linux distro should be formatted differently such as with ext3 which will not give you these issues unless you begin to fill up your hard drive.
I have experience equal performance from Opensuse to what i have with Debian and Slackware. I have no idea what you're talking about.

Last edited by Knightron; 12-29-2013 at 12:03 AM. Reason: made a paragraph easier to understand.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-30-2013, 12:53 AM   #12
chrism01
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Location: Sydney
Distribution: Centos 6.9, Centos 7.3
Posts: 17,417

Rep: Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397
Here's a useful list of MS Equiv SW for Linux http://wiki.linuxquestions.org/wiki/...ndows_software
I would strongly recommend using them and not going the Wine route if possible.

One thing you will discover is that on Linux there are usually many alternative tools for the same job; its all about personal choice.
Most distros are free, so try as many as you want.

This is worth a read http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm

Also this will come in handy http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-30-2013, 01:35 AM   #13
lemon09
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2009
Location: kolkata,India
Distribution: Mandriva,openSuse,Mint,Debian
Posts: 285
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 37
Quote:
Slower?? Slower than what?
Ignoring malware, and addware, Windows gets slow over time due to the design of fat32 and ntfs. Any Gnu/Linux distro should be formatted differently such as with ext3 which will not give you these issues unless you begin to fill up your hard drive.
I guess I am not talking about windows. I have used Mandriva for years and I was a big fan of it until recently when I tried installing openSuse. It was pretty good but occasionally it would have some graphical problem. And then at times dolphin would take much larger time to open. There were so many stuffs and I thought this might have slowed down the performance. It was then discovered that even commands like commands like ls and rm even take some time to perform (say about 20 secs or so) but even that is not expected in the command line mode I guess. My Mandriva machine was loaded with more stuffs but then for years it gave a decent performance.
What I have felt that process management in Linux is far better than windows. But for open Suse's recent releases I had some issues of getting slower at times. But believe that is very rare and the stuffs it ships with really outnumbers the flaws.
Few days ago I shifted to Debian and its doing pretty good.

@Arjun:
Even my friends complained my about your unnetbootin issue. You may try using the dvd and it will work fine. For ubuntu and mint I don't think you have any issue with the usb.

Let us know whatever you intend to do.
 
Old 12-30-2013, 05:25 AM   #14
Knightron
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2011
Location: Australia
Distribution: OpenSUSE
Posts: 1,396
Blog Entries: 7

Rep: Reputation: 166Reputation: 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by lemon09 View Post
I guess I am not talking about windows. I have used Mandriva for years and I was a big fan of it until recently when I tried installing openSuse. It was pretty good but occasionally it would have some graphical problem. And then at times dolphin would take much larger time to open. There were so many stuffs and I thought this might have slowed down the performance. It was then discovered that even commands like commands like ls and rm even take some time to perform (say about 20 secs or so) but even that is not expected in the command line mode I guess. My Mandriva machine was loaded with more stuffs but then for years it gave a decent performance.
What I have felt that process management in Linux is far better than windows. But for open Suse's recent releases I had some issues of getting slower at times. But believe that is very rare and the stuffs it ships with really outnumbers the flaws.
Few days ago I shifted to Debian and its doing pretty good.
That's interesting to hear. That's unusual behaviour. I haven't experienced that with any distro. Thanks for elaborating.
 
Old 12-30-2013, 06:02 AM   #15
Arjun
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2011
Posts: 120
Blog Entries: 2

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thanks @lemon09 for reply. I was not asking for MS office in Linux, but any tool like MS office in Linux. I am thinking to switch to ubuntu as well, since it provides many useful softwares builtin. Yes may be dual boot for some time is better option.

Thanks again @Knightron for reply. I got many things to learn from your post. I dont want to use wine untill i need it badly. So, softwares similar to windows for linux are the better option.

After reading your about CentOS latest version, i have tried it through my USB, its GUI is quite good than Ubuntu. Everything is placed in proper place & easily accessible. But, yes there are dependencies like flash player for video streaming which is not present in ubuntu. Cannot play video on browser.

Commands are different as well since I have also tried to install vlc player in it with this command

Code:
dpkg -i ./*.deb
which it didnt got installed. Even i cant take screen shot of the screen through printscreen button.

Thanks @chrism01 for reply. Thanks for the nice software list. Very helpful.

Last edited by Arjun; 12-30-2013 at 06:04 AM.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[SOLVED] Have to issue /etc/rc.d/rc.vboxdrv start every time I start virtual machine lihongwu Slackware 4 04-21-2013 01:04 AM
start script bash when system start,stop,reeboot, how ?? melmar Linux - General 4 12-10-2009 07:58 AM
when i try to start samba pdc's smb service nmbd failed to start . sandeepchau123 Linux - Newbie 2 10-20-2007 02:59 PM
Computer doesn't start; fans start then stop; 1 long, 1 short beep PatrickMay16 General 18 09-26-2007 08:48 PM
Can I gett KPPP to start when I start a browser on a network machine? duffboygrim Linux - Networking 0 03-25-2004 05:49 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:53 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration