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Old 08-29-2018, 03:17 AM   #1
hmsnaveen95
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Registered: Aug 2018
Location: Chennai, India
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First time linux user


Hey everyone!

I must admit, this is my first time getting into Linux. Although I've known it existed for many years, I never really had the drive to learn it. I have a new laptop and I want a fresh start. I have been mucking around with Ubuntu in a virtual drive, just getting a feel for the basics, and have watched a few different videos online explaining different important points of the software and why it's a good place to start for someone looking to practice coding etc.

I want to move to Ubuntu as my main OS, but have already had a few moments just installing from the USB boot where I think hmm, maybe I'm not ready.

So what would ya'll do?

I'm of a mind to just dive in and learn along the way, but then there is the option of having a dual boot of windows AND Linux so that if I get really stuck at least I still have a functioning OS for daily tasks.

Unfortunately I'm finding booting Ubuntu in virtualbox is taking far too much power for when I'm out and about..

Cheers
 
Old 08-29-2018, 10:14 AM   #2
hazel
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Dual-booting is how most of us oldies got started, but nowadays most people advise using Linux on a virtual machine at first. Trouble is, that takes a lot of power.

I say dual-boot. You'll need to defrag your Windows drive to make the necessary space. Most installers (certainly those on popular distros like Ubuntu) will detect your Windows system and ask you if you want to keep it. If you say yes, the free space on the drive will be turned into new partitions for Linux. But make sure you back everything up first!
 
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Old 08-29-2018, 11:26 AM   #3
BW-userx
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not ready? that is what she said. just close your eyes and jump in, you already know how to use LQ, the basic of it anyways.
 
Old 08-29-2018, 11:35 AM   #4
paracoder
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Try not to focus too much on the complexities of the Linux installation as distributions have eliminated a great deal of that for you (Ubuntu being one of the first in fact.)..

As you haven't gotten into it before, the better question to ask is: Once it's installed - what are you doing with it?

Learning an OS such as Linux or *NIX isn't about the install and everyday tasks - the reason so many distributions exist is that each one (ideally) targets a specific use-case! Analyze what should be done with a working Linux install once you're in it, otherwise it will just take up space on your drive while you stay in Windows with a dualboot you don't need.

If you work in IT, it is easier: setup the platforms you need inside the OS and see how well you can duplicate your development or IT related processes inside the Linux system.

Also be aware that UEFI and Legacy boots are likely to be a frustration if you don't look into it first. Figure out if you're using Secure Boot and UEFI, and go from there. Messing with the settings may (temporarily) break a windows install, but if you're changing settings in the BIOS and it prevents the boot - just load default values and reboot before you freak

Good luck! And welcome!
 
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Old 08-29-2018, 11:40 AM   #5
Turbocapitalist
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I'd also say to just go for it. There's nothing like learning by doing. There are several Ubuntu variants with different defaults. Any of them can be modified by adding, removing, or re-configuring programs, until it is exactly like one of the others. Trying the different Ubuntus will give you an idea of what you have available and how flexible and configurable an OS it is.

If you want to work up to things in phases, try some Live images first and boot from either USB stick or DVD. The Live images won't install anything on the hard disk and run from the USB stick or DVD instead. On the former, you can use extra space on the stick for persistent storage with only a little extra work.

After you've tried some Live images and decided on a distro to spend a lot more time with, then you can try dual booting. Again, if you've decided on one flavor of Ubuntu but remember things you'd like to have seen in another, they can be added with a few clicks.

Then the next to last step, you might backup your legacy OS, install your selected distro on bare metal, and then restore the legacy OS in to a VM on the GNU/Linux host. That way it will still be there if you feel a need for it but you can use the VM for snapshots so that when it curdles you can roll back to a last known good version with just a click or three.

However, take your time. Read. Ask questions.
 
Old 08-29-2018, 11:59 AM   #6
rtmistler
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What I'd recommend would be for you to post your system specifications and current state of affairs.

Because if it happens to be some obtuse system where there are problems getting it to boot correctly, you'd rather know that.

I'm more of a proponent of live booting using a USB stick or a DVD. This way you can tell if your system likes the distribution without the interference of the virtual machine software.

It is still worth determining if you wish to dual boot, if there might be a few things to work through, such as BIOS boot settings.

My other more simpler suggests involve cheap or throw-away systems. I know that's a matter of perspective, but purchasing one of the SBCs like a Hummingboard or Pi, you can get running Linux entirely on those systems, get to a desktop, and use them enough to get the experience going very well. The other alternative is if you have a throw-away system that you don't use much anyway, commission it for Linux permanently. This way you may not have to worry about dual boot issues.
 
Old 08-29-2018, 12:04 PM   #7
individual
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turbocapitalist View Post
...
If you want to work up to things in phases, try some Live images first and boot from either USB stick or DVD. The Live images won't install anything on the hard disk and run from the USB stick or DVD instead. On the former, you can use extra space on the stick for persistent storage with only a little extra work.
The Live OS route would be a good way for a beginner to go. I like antiX because it's easy to enable persistence. There's also MX Linux for users who want to use systemd.
 
Old 08-29-2018, 01:10 PM   #8
DennyY
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Smile First Time Linux User

Hello,

I just started Linux almost 2 years ago. I also started with CentOS 7 virtual box.

But after I got a new laptop, I installed CentOS 7 GUI and got rid of Windows completely.
So my advise to you (as the same advise from my mentor), get rid of Windows and force yourself to get familiar with Linux. And I have been using it ever since.
There are a lot of tutorials online, and nice people out here willing to help you out.

Good luck,
Denny


Quote:
Originally Posted by hmsnaveen95 View Post
Hey everyone!

I must admit, this is my first time getting into Linux. Although I've known it existed for many years, I never really had the drive to learn it. I have a new laptop and I want a fresh start. I have been mucking around with Ubuntu in a virtual drive, just getting a feel for the basics, and have watched a few different videos online explaining different important points of the software and why it's a good place to start for someone looking to practice coding etc.

I want to move to Ubuntu as my main OS, but have already had a few moments just installing from the USB boot where I think hmm, maybe I'm not ready.

So what would ya'll do?

I'm of a mind to just dive in and learn along the way, but then there is the option of having a dual boot of windows AND Linux so that if I get really stuck at least I still have a functioning OS for daily tasks.

Unfortunately I'm finding booting Ubuntu in virtualbox is taking far too much power for when I'm out and about..

Cheers
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-29-2018, 01:15 PM   #9
hydrurga
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It took me several months of dual booting Windows 7 and Linux Mint before I eventually used Mint full-time, progressively adding more and more software to Mint to achieve what I had previously done in Windows, until I no longer needed to boot up into Windows at all.
 
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