LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Latest LQ Deals
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 03-12-2017, 12:40 PM   #1
/GNUBY
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2017
Posts: 22

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
First installation ever, need distro suggestions


Hello, everyone. I thought I'd make my first post something that all the experienced users could have a friendly debate about.

I'm looking to do my first ever install of a Linux OS and would like some suggestions that would meet the scope I'm looking to fill.

Total noob, just learning CLI but have had some experience in a virtual environment. I'd like to do a desktop install that won't be over challenging, but the idea is to still learn some basic skills about the system, directory and partition setup, drivers, etc.

This is just for fun right now, so I don't have a specific task that I want to do with this system other than getting my hands dirty. It will go on an older box that is 64 bit. (XP is on it now.)

This is a chance to mold and influence the new kid. I look forward to hearing all suggestions. Let class begin.

Last edited by /GNUBY; 03-14-2017 at 07:40 PM.
 
Old 03-12-2017, 12:54 PM   #2
Turbocapitalist
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Distribution: Linux Mint, Devuan, OpenBSD
Posts: 4,444
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211
Drivers come along with the system so there is nothing to figure out there, unless you have the skill and interest to try writing or modifying one.

You do have a choice of several distros though. The main thing to remember there is that those are just the pre-configured defaults and the pre-installed packages. By changing the settings and adding or removing packages you can turn just about any distro into any other. That said, I'd recommend starting with one in the Linux Mint series for your desktop. It is GNU/Linux distro (yes it is) with a lot pre-configured to make it convenient as a desktop.

About the partitioning, you might start out with a separate /home partition, but otherwise on the desktop I don't see big gains for having a complex partitioning scheme. Having a separate /home makes it easier to keep your data across re-installation of a new system or distro. Partitioning a server would be another matter, depending on its purpose, but not on the desktop.

Back to the desktop, in addition to Linux Mint, since you have a 64-bit machine you might consider TrueOS. It's a FreeBSD distro (yes it is) and about the only exciting difference you'll see right away would be use of ZFS by default.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-12-2017, 01:04 PM   #3
LVaivis
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2017
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by /GNUBY View Post
Hello, everyone. I thought I'd make my first post something that all the experienced users could have a friendly debate about.

I'm looking to do my first ever install of a Linux OS and would like some suggestions that would meet the scope I'm looking to fill.

Total noob, just learning CLI but have had some experience in a virtual environment. I'd like to do a desktop install that won't be over challenging, but the idea is to still learn some basic skills about the system, directory and partition setup, drivers, etc.

This is just for fun right now, so I don't have a specific task that I want to do with this system other than getting my hands dirty. It will go on an older box that is 64 bit. (XP is on it now.)

This is a chance to mold and influence the new kid. I look forward to hearing all suggestions. BTW, being graded for a CS class on this post so any help is really appreciated. Let class begin.

Soo..i am not linux pro but i know phew things. Atart with beginner friendly distro.try Ubuntu, Kubuntu or Lubuntu..they are easy. Don't take server versions becouae they are CLI based and you'll be lost in it. Just install Ubuntu with desktop and use Terminal for all CLI work and fun. Don't use some commands which younsawnon internet..they can delete all on hard drive. NEVER type in rm-rf *..it will whipe root directory clean.
Also don't use Kali or Arch..they're too difficult for u. You need to know all basics. Just google around and watch some videos on Youtube..they're helpfull
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-12-2017, 01:16 PM   #4
Rickkkk
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2014
Location: Montreal, Quebec, CANADA
Distribution: Arch
Posts: 1,234

Rep: Reputation: 451Reputation: 451Reputation: 451Reputation: 451Reputation: 451
Hi /GNUBY,

My recommendation for a linux distribution would be more based on how much you want to "have your hand held" or not. As mentioned above by Turbocapitalist, Mint and the Ubuntu series are very popular, All-In-One types of distros, that deliver a full desktop experience along with a pile of applications (useful and otherwise, depending on your needs). They come with installation programs that guide the user through the setup and leave little room for error. These types of distros tend to be the first choice for new linux users, particularly those coming from Windows, and I would recommend starting here.

If you are interested in a more manual, "do-it-yourself" or minimalist alternative, let us know and I and others will be happy to suggest candidates.

Cheers :-)
 
Old 03-12-2017, 01:19 PM   #5
DavidMcCann
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: London
Distribution: PCLinuxOS, Xubuntu
Posts: 5,438

Rep: Reputation: 1894Reputation: 1894Reputation: 1894Reputation: 1894Reputation: 1894Reputation: 1894Reputation: 1894Reputation: 1894Reputation: 1894Reputation: 1894Reputation: 1894
You can learn using any distro. As everyone always says, you can't go far wrong with Mint, but it you want to be adventurous try

1. Slackware. The advantage is its stability and clarity of structure. The disadvantage is that the best documentation is provided by third parties and has to be searched for, the package management hasn't changed since the 90s, and there's very little software ready to run. Slackers would think it cheating, but my answer is to use Salix: 100% compatible but with twice the ready to run programs and a few useful graphical configuration tools.

2. Arch. The great thing about that is the documentation. The problem is installation, for there's no installer: you just spend an afternoon typing in a series of commands! But if you want to cheat, ArchBang will install it for you.


For information about partitioning (perhaps more than you'll want to know!)
http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/gparted.html
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-12-2017, 01:37 PM   #6
Timothy Miller
Moderator
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Location: Arizona, USA
Distribution: Debian, KDE Neon, Arch, Void
Posts: 3,300

Rep: Reputation: 1066Reputation: 1066Reputation: 1066Reputation: 1066Reputation: 1066Reputation: 1066Reputation: 1066Reputation: 1066
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidMcCann View Post
2. Arch. The great thing about that is the documentation. The problem is installation, for there's no installer: you just spend an afternoon typing in a series of commands! But if you want to cheat, ArchBang will install it for you.
Or Antergos, which is my personal favorite Arch installer. Just thought I'd throw that in.

Overall, I'd be more likely to suggest some form of Mint like everyone, as Slack and Arch do have a somewhat steep learning curve (even if you use an installer), and can easily frustrate someone that doesn't know what they're doing yet.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-12-2017, 02:15 PM   #7
/GNUBY
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2017
Posts: 22

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Thanks for all these suggestions. I think that if I want to learn, really learn, I'll need to get a little bloody doing this, but I don't think I want to build it from scratch. Is there a happy medium? I'm not losing anything but time.

Last edited by /GNUBY; 03-12-2017 at 02:19 PM.
 
Old 03-12-2017, 02:19 PM   #8
jsbjsb001
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: Earth? I would say I hope so but I'm not so sure about that... I could just be a figment of your imagination too.
Distribution: Currently OpenMandriva. Previously openSUSE, PCLinuxOS, CentOS, among others over the years.
Posts: 3,436

Rep: Reputation: 1781Reputation: 1781Reputation: 1781Reputation: 1781Reputation: 1781Reputation: 1781Reputation: 1781Reputation: 1781Reputation: 1781Reputation: 1781Reputation: 1781
Quote:
Originally Posted by /GNUBY View Post
Thanks for all these suggestions. I think that if I want to learn, really learn, I'll need to get a little bloody doing this, but I don't think I want to build it from scratch. Is there a happy medium? I'm not losing anything but time.
Why don't you have a look at: https://distrowatch.com/

Hope this helps.
 
Old 03-12-2017, 02:20 PM   #9
Turbocapitalist
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Distribution: Linux Mint, Devuan, OpenBSD
Posts: 4,444
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211
You could do it in several stages. Start with an easier one, like Linux Mint. Then try Debian or Devuan. Then Slackware or Arch. Then LFS. Give each a few days to work with. There will be enough similarities that you will be building on something familiar, but enough difference that you will be learning the actual system.

Then if you have time or interest try TrueOS and, later, plain FreeBSD.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-12-2017, 02:33 PM   #10
Timothy Miller
Moderator
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Location: Arizona, USA
Distribution: Debian, KDE Neon, Arch, Void
Posts: 3,300

Rep: Reputation: 1066Reputation: 1066Reputation: 1066Reputation: 1066Reputation: 1066Reputation: 1066Reputation: 1066Reputation: 1066
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turbocapitalist View Post
You could do it in several stages. Start with an easier one, like Linux Mint. Then try Debian or Devuan. Then Slackware or Arch. Then LFS. Give each a few days to work with. There will be enough similarities that you will be building on something familiar, but enough difference that you will be learning the actual system.

Then if you have time or interest try TrueOS and, later, plain FreeBSD.
Also, just because Mint has the tools to make things easy, doesn't necessarily mean you HAVE to use them. Once you get used to using whatever super easy desktop, there's nothing stopping you from installing a basic WM, uninstalling all the gui tools for system management, and learning everything manually using the same Mint. Those tools are optional, and you're not FORCED to use them.

If you truly do want to learn linux well, I will definitely say then you'd want to use a few different distro's just for the familiarity of the things they do differently. But for basic linux knowledge of how to do things, you CAN make Mint as in depth for management as Slack or Arch. Heck, you could even do it like LFS if you REALLY wanted to, it's just a matter of how comfortable you feel doing it.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-12-2017, 02:58 PM   #11
/GNUBY
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2017
Posts: 22

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Those are both great suggestions, thank you again, and I think that I will go that way with it. I noticed that no one suggested Elementary, is it not liked for some reason or just simply not as good?
 
Old 03-12-2017, 03:10 PM   #12
Turbocapitalist
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Distribution: Linux Mint, Devuan, OpenBSD
Posts: 4,444
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211Reputation: 2211
Quote:
Originally Posted by /GNUBY View Post
Those are both great suggestions, thank you again, and I think that I will go that way with it. I noticed that no one suggested Elementary, is it not liked for some reason or just simply not as good?
It's fine. It's based on Ubuntu, but uses the Pantheon desktop environment (DE) and the Gala window manager (WM). Again, you can swap out the window managers and desktop environments in any one of the distros and keep yourself busy with just that for weeks. You can even dispense with a desktop environment and just run a window manager by itself. FVWM is a classic WM there, and if you want to see how much it can be customized, see FVWM-crystal. Oroborus might be the smallest WM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-12-2017, 03:55 PM   #13
fatmac
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2011
Location: Upper Hale, Surrey/Hants Border, UK
Posts: 3,342

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Best distro to learn not only Linux but how to create your own version, or have a 'persistent' set up on a pendrive, etc, would be AntiX, or if you want more bling, MX Linux, based on Debian, but without systemd, therefore 'old school' so lots of info on the web. But you won't need the web because they come with great documentation, & have really friendly forums.
http://antix.mepis.com/index.php?title=Main_Page
P.S. Of course you can run them 'live' if you want, without having to install.

Last edited by fatmac; 03-12-2017 at 03:57 PM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-12-2017, 04:54 PM   #14
BW-userx
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Sep 2013
Location: Somewhere in my head.
Distribution: Slackware FreeBSD Win10 MX
Posts: 9,609

Rep: Reputation: 2071Reputation: 2071Reputation: 2071Reputation: 2071Reputation: 2071Reputation: 2071Reputation: 2071Reputation: 2071Reputation: 2071Reputation: 2071Reputation: 2071
some people are going to yell. But I suggest Slackware. It now has other 3rd party add ons to deal with packaging and dependencies to same. sbotools for one. it is relativity easy to setup post install wise.

There is even a section in LQ just for Slackware just in case situations.

Last edited by BW-userx; 03-12-2017 at 04:55 PM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-12-2017, 05:30 PM   #15
notKlaatu
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2010
Location: Lawrence, New Zealand
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 1,075

Rep: Reputation: 725Reputation: 725Reputation: 725Reputation: 725Reputation: 725Reputation: 725Reputation: 725
Given your list of requirements, I agree with BW-userx. Start with Slackware. It can be, arguably, challenging at first; the setup will likely be something you can handle, but there'll be some things that won't be automatic, and you'll wonder why, which in turn will prompt you to research, and then in you learning how Linux works. That's the value-add to Slackware: it doesn't just change stuff out from under you. You'll come to appreciate that, especially if you try and learn on Slackware, and then spend a month in something else for fun. You learn quickly why Slackware is, well, the best!
 
1 members found this post helpful.
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[rant] DIstro frustration and alienation/suggestions for stable distro Draciron Linux - Distributions 3 10-16-2009 11:27 AM
distro suggestions? benzslr123 Linux - Security 1 11-26-2008 12:17 PM
Suggestions for distro? daedalus4.2 Linux - Distributions 3 03-29-2006 08:37 AM
Distro suggestions jamadasou Linux - Newbie 3 10-04-2004 07:53 AM
Looking for New Distro. Any Suggestions? DAKPluto Linux - Distributions 13 08-09-2002 01:03 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:28 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration