LinuxQuestions.org
Download your favorite Linux distribution at LQ ISO.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 10-16-2017, 07:47 PM   #1
okratpack
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2017
Posts: 1

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Files keep disappearing from Linux ext4 drive


So I am working on a Windows 7 machine. Through a program called MiniTool Partition Wizard I formatted a 64GB USB 3.0 ScanDisk Ultra flash drive in EXT4. Now Through a program called paragon EXTFS for Windows I downloaded some drivers that allow me to see this drive. I created a project and can drag and drop the files from my windows machine to the Linux formatted drive. It takes time for the files to copy over, they show up on the drive and I can play the video off the drive. BUT once I eject the drive and plug it back in the files completely disappear. Please help. These are for a promo at a movie theater and they are waiting for the files. Thanks for your help in advance.
 
Old 10-17-2017, 06:31 AM   #2
rtmistler
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Location: USA
Distribution: MINT Debian, Angstrom, SUSE, Ubuntu, Debian
Posts: 9,354
Blog Entries: 13

Rep: Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411
Hi and welcome to LQ.

Not sure this is a Linux question.

Why do you need to format the drive this way?

A Linux system can recognize a standard FAT32 file system which natively comes with a USB stick.
 
Old 10-17-2017, 06:45 AM   #3
dave@burn-it.co.uk
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2011
Distribution: Puppy
Posts: 601

Rep: Reputation: 172Reputation: 172
Besides that Fat32 is more efficient on a USB drive, especially one less than about 90Gb.

The reason they have disappeared is that they were likely never Actually written to the drive. Windows will write to the buffers and delay writing to the actual drive until it has time to spare. It concentrates on servicing user requests first. One way to force it to write to the drive is to use the "safely remove" feature. The same would have happened under Linux if you hadn't given the system enough idle time to actually write the data.
 
Old 10-17-2017, 06:58 AM   #4
rtmistler
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Location: USA
Distribution: MINT Debian, Angstrom, SUSE, Ubuntu, Debian
Posts: 9,354
Blog Entries: 13

Rep: Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411
Well they, the OP, did say they ejected the drive, which to me could mean they did the safely remove action.

My assumption is that with these various pieces of software to partition and format, something got screwed up, somehow.

I guess my continued point, and probably those who use both Win and Linux would agree.

"You do Linux stuff ... in Linux"
"You do Windows stuff ... in Windows"

You therefore do not try to create a Linux formatted drive, from within Windows, and vice versa.
 
Old 10-17-2017, 08:11 AM   #5
pan64
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Mar 2012
Location: Hungary
Distribution: debian/ubuntu/suse ...
Posts: 16,604

Rep: Reputation: 5604Reputation: 5604Reputation: 5604Reputation: 5604Reputation: 5604Reputation: 5604Reputation: 5604Reputation: 5604Reputation: 5604Reputation: 5604Reputation: 5604
you may need to check the drive.
 
Old 10-17-2017, 08:59 AM   #6
dave@burn-it.co.uk
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2011
Distribution: Puppy
Posts: 601

Rep: Reputation: 172Reputation: 172
Quote:
Well they, the OP, did say they ejected the drive, which to me could mean they did the safely remove action.
But did they give it time to action before physically removing it??
 
Old 10-17-2017, 10:07 AM   #7
suicidaleggroll
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2010
Location: Colorado
Distribution: OpenSUSE, CentOS
Posts: 5,573

Rep: Reputation: 2138Reputation: 2138Reputation: 2138Reputation: 2138Reputation: 2138Reputation: 2138Reputation: 2138Reputation: 2138Reputation: 2138Reputation: 2138Reputation: 2138
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtmistler View Post
I guess my continued point, and probably those who use both Win and Linux would agree.

"You do Linux stuff ... in Linux"
"You do Windows stuff ... in Windows"

You therefore do not try to create a Linux formatted drive, from within Windows, and vice versa.
^ This

Don't use NTFS in Linux, don't use EXT in Windows. If you need to transfer files between them and can't use one of the standard network protocols (ftp, scp, etc), use FAT32. If you need to transfer files >4GB, then your best option is to set up a virtual machine on one of the systems (either a Linux VM on a Windows host, or a Windows VM on a Linux host), and pass the drive into the VM so it can handle the filesystem natively.
 
Old 10-18-2017, 01:39 PM   #8
fatmac
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2011
Location: Upper Hale, Surrey/Hants Border, UK
Posts: 4,208

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Use a 'live' Linux to create & format the pendrive to ext4, then copy your project to the drive (using Linux).

(Presumably, this project is to run on a Linux machine, otherwise you're wasting your time & complicating things using a Linux filesystem.)
 
Old 10-19-2017, 09:03 AM   #9
Shadow_7
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Distribution: debian
Posts: 4,137
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 873Reputation: 873Reputation: 873Reputation: 873Reputation: 873Reputation: 873Reputation: 873
You could get an sbc like a raspberry pi and share the drive over samba. A little harder to setup, but you wouldn't need 3rd party tools that fail to work. Aside from putty to ssh to the pi to mount/umount assuming you didn't have the pi hooked up to anything more than ethernet.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Transferring Files from an NTFS Drive to an Ext4 Drive alemoo Linux - Newbie 14 02-09-2014 10:13 PM
fsck.ext4 zero-filled Files on a lvm-partition because of dying drive DrBenzo Linux - Newbie 5 01-24-2014 07:44 AM
[SOLVED] Can't see files/folder on a formatted ext4 hard drive. rssn6 Debian 21 03-06-2012 06:36 PM
[SOLVED] How to transfer files from windows drive to Mandriva ext4 drive? rrsc16954 Mandriva 7 01-23-2011 07:47 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:01 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration