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-   -   File Permissions Problem with a Fat Partition (https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/file-permissions-problem-with-a-fat-partition-390355/)

soimless 12-07-2005 11:43 PM

File Permissions Problem with a Fat Partition
 
Hello, I have a Fat Partition that is automatically mounted at start up as /share. I want all users to have rwx permissions so I opened a terminal and typed sudo chmod -R 777 /share it finished with no errors but when I tried to modify a image in /share/souls/11.26.2005 I was unable to rewrite the file. ls -l shows that all the folders and files in /share are still 755. I tried sudo chmod -R 777 again and still they all are 755.

Is there something about changing the permissions with a diffrent partition that I am missing?

Wim Sturkenboom 12-07-2005 11:47 PM

I think, you have to change the permissions in /etc/fstab. No access to a linux machine with a FAT partition at this moment, so I'm not sure what the exact line must be.

See my post in http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=292847 for an example and explanation of the correct line.

brainiac 12-08-2005 12:57 PM

I had some of the same issues. Linux file permissions don't really mean anything to a Windows partition. I fixed my problems in fstab using "default" instead of trying to tell it what I thought they should be. My line appears as /dev/hdc5 /mp3 vfat defaults 0 0 and it works for me.

soimless 12-08-2005 01:20 PM

That's exactly what I have in /etc/fstab.
/dev/sda2 /share vfat defaults 0 0

geeman2.0 12-08-2005 01:49 PM

Try replacing "defaults" with "rw,umask=000"

tuxrules 12-08-2005 02:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by geeman2.0
Try replacing "defaults" with "rw,umask=000"

I would only add one more thing and it has worked for me always...

Code:

users,rw,umask=000

sundialsvcs 12-08-2005 02:32 PM

The FAT32 disk format does not contain any space for "permissions," or "user" or "group," or all those other nice Unix ideas. Only the concept of "read-only" files and "hidden" files. So, when you mount such a partition, Linux has to fake-it. Usually, the files on the device are either writeable to everyone or they appear to "belong to" whomever mounted the drive.

FAT32 is simply a filesystem where ... security does not exist.

soimless 12-08-2005 03:59 PM

It did something.
 
users,rw,umask=000 did something, /share now appears as apart of my computer, like a cd drive in gnome. but I still can't write to it as a regular user. I also tried sudo chmod -R 777 /share again it paused for a wile and still did nothing.

soimless 12-08-2005 06:45 PM

nevermind, when I restarted I got the Permissions. Thank you all

Wim Sturkenboom 12-08-2005 11:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sundialsvcs
The FAT32 disk format does not contain any space for "permissions," or "user" or "group," or all those other nice Unix ideas. Only the concept of "read-only" files and "hidden" files. So, when you mount such a partition, Linux has to fake-it. Usually, the files on the device are either writeable to everyone or they appear to "belong to" whomever mounted the drive.

Very true, but you can still limit the access to the partition itself. And that's what was the case for TS and he/she did not like it.


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