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Old 11-09-2019, 07:49 AM   #61
jamison20000e
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Distribution: any GPL that works well on my cheapest; has been KDE or CLI but open... http://goo.gl/NqgqJx &c ;-)
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There's countless information out there for that but I don't mind unsubscribing if you want to hop down that rabbit hole... lol.

One of the best things about running Linux is the documentation man.

Have fun!
 
Old 11-09-2019, 12:13 PM   #62
jsbjsb001
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lisamint View Post
Thanks, ChuangTzu. Now that you mention Systemd, what is that all about? I read something about it but I could not really figure out what the problem is. Most distros use it, while others don't and their users seem to be happy about it. Can you explain, please?
systemd is an init system, like with anything else it's up to the individual distribution's which init system they use.

I wouldn't worry about the inner workings of Linux distributions just yet. There is plenty of debates about systemd you'll find all over the Internet about it. It's best to make up your own mind about it.
 
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Old 11-09-2019, 05:57 PM   #63
ChuangTzu
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsbjsb001 View Post
systemd is an init system, like with anything else it's up to the individual distribution's which init system they use.

I wouldn't worry about the inner workings of Linux distributions just yet. There is plenty of debates about systemd you'll find all over the Internet about it. It's best to make up your own mind about it.
+100, we don't need to know how to rebuild an engine in order to drive, that comes later if there's interest.
 
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Old 11-11-2019, 12:28 PM   #64
PECONET009
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systemd vs init.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lisamint View Post
Thanks, ChuangTzu. Now that you mention Systemd, what is that all about? I read something about it but I could not really figure out what the problem is. Most distros use it, while others don't and their users seem to be happy about it. Can you explain, please?
"systemd" – A init replacement daemon designed to start process in parallel, implemented in a number of standard distribution – Fedora, OpenSuSE, Arch, RHEL, CentOS, etc.
"init" is a abbreviation for Initialization. The init is a daemon process which starts as soon as the computer starts and continue running till, it is shutdown. In-fact init is the first process that starts when a computer boots, making it the parent of all other running processes directly or indirectly and hence typically it is assigned "pid=1".

More here: https://www.quora.com/Why-is-%E2%80%...80%9D-in-Linux
Even more info here: Systemd vs SysV vs Upstart: https://fossbytes.com/systemd-vs-sys-v-vs-upstart/

Last edited by PECONET009; 11-11-2019 at 12:30 PM. Reason: Additions.
 
  


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