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wainiew0823 07-07-2010 10:33 PM

Dual os problem in linux redhat
 
Hi im having trouble in installing dual os in my laptop. i'm currently running in windows 7, how come I can't detect my internal harddrive. when i tried to install Linux the external harddrive was recognize.

vikas027 07-07-2010 11:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wainiew0823 (Post 4026862)
Hi im having trouble in installing dual os in my laptop. i'm currently running in windows 7, how come I can't detect my internal harddrive. when i tried to install Linux the external harddrive was recognize.


The easiest way what I have found is to have a dual boot is :-

1) Install Windows 7/XP/Vista e.t.c., such that you have a unformatted partition left.
Say you have a 160 GB Hard Disk, use C: drive as 20GB , D: Drive as 100GB. Then do not format the rest 40 GB.

2) Boot your machine from Linux Bootable DVD/CD.

3) When prompted to partition the Hard Disks for installation, use option "use free space and create deafult partition" It is something like that, I believe the third option.

Also, it would be easier for you if you plugin your external drive after making your system dual-boot.

wainiew0823 07-07-2010 11:45 PM

yes, I already allot a free unformated in my harddisk but when I use free space and create default partition there no option if it is SDA. unless I insert the external harddrive

Kenny_Strawn 07-07-2010 11:53 PM

If the drive is formatted in anything other than NTFS or FAT you will have to reformat it to work in Windows unless you find a Windows driver for the file system the drive is formatted in.

vikas027 07-07-2010 11:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wainiew0823 (Post 4026905)
yes, I already allot a free unformated in my harddisk but when I use free space and create default partition there no option if it is SDA. unless I insert the external harddrive

Ideally, this should not happen.

Which version of Linux are you trying to install ?

Are you sure you have unformatted disk ? That disk must not show in Windows. I am just confirming it.

wainiew0823 07-08-2010 12:19 AM

redhat 5 sir. yes im sure sir 20gb of free space

vikas027 07-08-2010 12:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wainiew0823 (Post 4026930)
redhat 5 sir. yes im sure sir 20gb of free space

Ok Wainiew, if you have unformatted/unallocated space and still it is not detecting, my knowledge stops here.

Lets wait for someone else to answer.

wainiew0823 07-08-2010 12:46 AM

thank for your help sir, I appreciate it for noobs like me

tommyttt 07-08-2010 02:54 AM

Hi Wainiew
When you say your trying to install Redhat 5 is that RHEL 5 or the very old Redhat 5? I can't comment on either of those since I don't use them. What I would do, after installing windows, would be use a program like gparted with the external drive disconnected and be sure it sees the internal drive. It should show the free space as unallocated. Try formatting it as ext3. That tells you it is reachable with the computers hardware.

Gparted can be obtained as part of PartedMagic. Download that and burn it to a CD. Boot with it and click on the partitioning icon, that brings up gparted.

After you know the computer can see that partition, leave PartedMagic and boot from your installation media. It should now be able to find that partition to install to.

If that doesn't work, come back to this forum and ask some more.

Tom

saikee 07-08-2010 03:08 AM

Use a Linux Live CD and show us the output of
Code:

fdisk -l
to stop the confusion.
If an old Red Hat 5 and not RHEL then it would not be able to recognise a Sata disk without the assistance of a driver.

Think I have advise this kind of problem before. The trick is not to offer unallocated space to an installer but partitions created by a Linux tool so that they are automatically Type 83 suitable for Linux installation.

For 20Gb space I would use 1Gb for a swap and the rest for one partition for mounting /. Foregt about the LVM and separate /boot. So two partitions should suffice. swap created in Linux should have Type 82 ID.

wainiew0823 07-08-2010 09:53 PM

@tommyttt
I'm current downloading it right now, I'll try to what you advice after the download.


@saikee
I'm using RHEL_5, I thought Redhat 5 and RHEL are the same sorry for the confusion. Where will can I find the type 82 and 83 ??

saikee 07-09-2010 03:19 AM

In any Linux partitioning tool the partition ID are always displayed.
Code:

saikee@saikee-desktop:~$ sudo fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 300.0 GB, 300090728448 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 36483 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xb327b327

  Device Boot      Start        End      Blocks  Id  System
/dev/sda1  *          1      36483  293049666    5  Extended
/dev/sda5              1        122      979902  82  Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sda6            123      24437  195310206  83  Linux
/dev/sda7          24438      36483    96759463+  83  Linux

If you create a partition in Linux, say using cfdisk, fdisk, parted, or sfdisk etc, it will be automatically Type 83 but you always have the option of "type" to alter it to any of the 100+ different types supported by Linux. Most Linux partitioning tools in terminal display these 100+ partition type numbers as choices if you alter the type ID.
Code:

                                                                cfdisk (util-linux-ng 2.14.2)

                                                                    Disk Drive: /dev/sda
                                                            Size: 300090728448 bytes, 300.0 GB
                                                    Heads: 255  Sectors per Track: 63  Cylinders: 36483

      Name                    Flags                Part Type            FS Type                        [Label]                      Size (MB)
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      sda5                                          Logical            Linux swap / Solaris                                          1003.46            *

 01 FAT12                12 Compaq diagnostics    4F QNX4.x 3rd part      81 Minix / old Linux    A8 Darwin UFS            E1 DOS access
 02 XENIX root            14 Hidden FAT16 <32M    50 OnTrack DM            82 Linux swap / Solaris  A9 NetBSD                E3 DOS R/O
 03 XENIX usr            16 Hidden FAT16          51 OnTrack DM6 Aux1      83 Linux                AB Darwin boot          E4 SpeedStor
 04 FAT16 <32M            17 Hidden HPFS/NTFS      52 CP/M                  84 OS/2 hidden C: drive  B7 BSDI fs              EB BeOS fs
 05 Extended              18 AST SmartSleep        53 OnTrack DM6 Aux3      85 Linux extended        B8 BSDI swap            EE GPT
 06 FAT16                1B Hidden W95 FAT32      54 OnTrackDM6            86 NTFS volume set      BB Boot Wizard hidden    EF EFI (FAT-12/16/32)
 07 HPFS/NTFS            1C Hidden W95 FAT32 (LB  55 EZ-Drive              87 NTFS volume set      BE Solaris boot          F0 Linux/PA-RISC boot
 08 AIX                  1E Hidden W95 FAT16 (LB  56 Golden Bow            88 Linux plaintext      BF Solaris              F1 SpeedStor
 09 AIX bootable          24 NEC DOS              5C Priam Edisk          8E Linux LVM            C1 DRDOS/sec (FAT-12)    F4 SpeedStor
 0A OS/2 Boot Manager    39 Plan 9                61 SpeedStor            93 Amoeba                C4 DRDOS/sec (FAT-16 <  F2 DOS secondary
 0B W95 FAT32            3C PartitionMagic recov  63 GNU HURD or SysV      94 Amoeba BBT            C6 DRDOS/sec (FAT-16)    FB VMware VMFS
 0C W95 FAT32 (LBA)      40 Venix 80286          64 Novell Netware 286    9F BSD/OS                C7 Syrinx                FC VMware VMKCORE
 0E W95 FAT16 (LBA)      41 PPC PReP Boot        65 Novell Netware 386    A0 IBM Thinkpad hiberna  DA Non-FS data          FD Linux RAID autodetec
 0F W95 Ext'd (LBA)      42 SFS                  70 DiskSecure Multi-Boo  A5 FreeBSD              DB CP/M / CTOS / ...    FE LANstep
 10 OPUS                  4D QNX4.x                75 PC/IX                A6 OpenBSD              DE Dell Utility          FF BBT
 11 Hidden FAT12          4E QNX4.x 2nd part      80 Old Minix            A7 NeXTSTEP              DF BootIt
























        Enter filesystem type: 83


alli_yas 07-09-2010 04:39 AM

@wainiew0823

As an aside, why are you installing RHEL on your laptop? RHEL is enterprise commercial Linux; meaning its meant for server applications - and you require a subscription to deploy it.

If you're installing on your laptop to learn I suggest you install either CentOS (which is a RHEL clone but is free and supported) or Fedora (which contains the latest and greatest features that are planned for future RHEL releases).

I've also found that dual booting can be a painful exercise; and generally the best way I've found to do it is to install Windows first; and thereafter use Anaconda to shrink the Windows partition (though this is not a very precise method and you can break your Windows install).

My personal preference/suggestion is that if you can do this, rather don't dual boot; but run your Linux stand-alone.

saikee 07-09-2010 06:48 AM

alli_yas,

I have downloaded a RHEL from Distrowatch.com. Has to be a free version and not the current one.

Haven't used it much and it might have even got a sell-by date refusing to work after a period has expired.

I agree using CentOS is a safter bet if one is happy to stick with a 2.6.18 kernel while most of the others are onto kernal 2.6.33.

alli_yas 07-09-2010 07:43 AM

Quote:

I have downloaded a RHEL from Distrowatch.com. Has to be a free version and not the current one.

Haven't used it much and it might have even got a sell-by date refusing to work after a period has expired.
Not sure what version you downloaded, but it won't have an expiry date as such. Red Hat sells subscriptions as their licensing model that entitles you to full support and access to the latest updates.

The big thing about Red Hat is that if you don't have the subscription; your install will become out of date very quickly; versus CentOS; where you do have access to the latest updates from the CentOS support community.

Regarding the kernel version; RHEL/CentOS 5 uses 2.6.18 versus Fedora 13 which is currently on 2.6.33 - the choice of which to use depends on what you're trying to achieve.

If you're running the OS on a server/trying to simulate the behaviour of the server; its logical to chose the more stable RHEL/CentOS 5. However, for your own personal "playground" with the latest and greatest from Red Hat/Fedora; go with the latest Fedora 13.

Take note though that Fedora doesn't lend itself to being an "easy to use" distro (such as Ubuntu/Mint/etc) - having the latest applications means there'll be bugs and you have to be able to figure them out and fix them.


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