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Old 02-16-2006, 02:58 PM   #1
Envision5000
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Dual boot Question


If I have nothing on my harddrive right now. Is there a way to easily setup windows and linux on the same drive. Is there a tutorial anywhere?
 
Old 02-16-2006, 03:05 PM   #2
tuxrules
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Yes...there are a zillion tutorials on the web and threads on this forum. One liner...install windows first (keep free space on hard drive) and then install the distro of your choice.

Tux,
 
Old 02-16-2006, 03:13 PM   #3
pixellany
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Empty hard drive----you are the kind of beginner that we LOVE!!!!!

I recommend that you consider buying a second drive---40GB is cheap. Put the 2 OSes on one drive (separate partitions), and format the other drive FAT32 for data. This will be easily accessed by both Windows and Linux.

Next best is a data partition on the same drive with the OS(es).

How big is your existing drive?
 
Old 02-16-2006, 03:14 PM   #4
pixellany
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Search here for "Saikee"---In his sig, he has links to a bunch of tutorials
 
Old 02-16-2006, 05:35 PM   #5
Envision5000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany
Empty hard drive----you are the kind of beginner that we LOVE!!!!!

I recommend that you consider buying a second drive---40GB is cheap. Put the 2 OSes on one drive (separate partitions), and format the other drive FAT32 for data. This will be easily accessed by both Windows and Linux.

Next best is a data partition on the same drive with the OS(es).

How big is your existing drive?
my drive is 75g 10,000 rpm
 
Old 02-16-2006, 06:05 PM   #6
pixellany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Envision5000
my drive is 75g 10,000 rpm
With one drive, I would use ~6-8GB each for Windows and Linux, and the rest for data (FAT32)
 
Old 02-16-2006, 06:58 PM   #7
saikee
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My suggestion

(1) Use a Linux Live CD, almost any one will do or one that is also installable too, boot it up. (I use Kanotix as the example below as it is a installable Live CD)

(2) Use the command mode, get root privileges (needed for system-related tasks) by typing "su" and the run the "cfdisk" program
Code:
su
cfdisk /dev/sda
Normally a root password is needed but some Live CD like Kanotix grant root status immediately and no password is asked. Since your disk spins at 10,000rpm it should be a Sata.

(3) Create
sda1, primary partition, 25Gb, type 7 NTFS for XP, select this partition "bootable".
sda2, primary partition, 8Gb, type 83 for native Linux
sda3, primary partition, 1Gb, primary partition, type 82 for Linux Swap
sda5, logical partition, 25Gb, type c for fat32 data-only

rest of space for the rainny day. Making sda5 will trigger the creation of sda4 as the extended partition and so all the empty space can later be added as sda6, sda7...etc. click "write" so that the above partition table become operational on a reboot. If you need extra space use Kanotix's Qtparted program to squeeze sda5 to a smaller size.

(4) Install XP into sda1. XP knows where to find it as it is marked NTFS and will install it as the "C" drive. Make sure XP boots and works satisfactorily before proceeding to the next step.

(5) Install your chosen Linux but must insist it to be install into sda2. The Linux will know how to use the Swap sda3 automatically. When it comes to the location for the boot loader choose "MBR".

Most Linux I know will dual boot XP automatically without the user lifting a finger. If it doesn't lodge a complaint here. Show us the boot loader and we will point a gun at its head to make it do it.
 
Old 02-16-2006, 07:47 PM   #8
pljvaldez
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saikee is the master, but if you're a bit timid of ncurses (like an old school dos graphic), most live CD's have a point and click graphical partitioning tool called qtparted.
 
Old 02-16-2006, 09:26 PM   #9
saikee
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I use Qtparted too and it is available in Kanotix.

However I find cfdisk is more educational, especially for newcomers.

Partitioning is a serious matter and one needs a bit of understanding of the rules in using a hard disk in order to partition everything successfully. If a mistake is made qtparted will stop work, especially the older versions and a user is not always left with a clue.

cfdisk gives more response and I was "taught" a lot by using it. This is quite important when starting to use logical partitions, avoiding "dead spaces" and finding how partitions are named and arranged.

Although qtparted is easier to use but one gains more by working with cfdisk too. cfdisk will come into its own when for whatever reason there is no desktop available as being a Bash command it is available in nearly all the distros except the Red Hat family which uses sfdisk instead. Many distros also have their own version of partitioner like Disk Druid, Yast, gparted to name a few. Therefore it is safer if one can manage the more widely available cfdisk.
 
Old 02-23-2006, 10:52 PM   #10
Envision5000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saikee
My suggestion

(1) Use a Linux Live CD, almost any one will do or one that is also installable too, boot it up. (I use Kanotix as the example below as it is a installable Live CD)

(2) Use the command mode, get root privileges (needed for system-related tasks) by typing "su" and the run the "cfdisk" program
Code:
su
cfdisk /dev/sda
Normally a root password is needed but some Live CD like Kanotix grant root status immediately and no password is asked. Since your disk spins at 10,000rpm it should be a Sata.

(3) Create
sda1, primary partition, 25Gb, type 7 NTFS for XP, select this partition "bootable".
sda2, primary partition, 8Gb, type 83 for native Linux
sda3, primary partition, 1Gb, primary partition, type 82 for Linux Swap
sda5, logical partition, 25Gb, type c for fat32 data-only

rest of space for the rainny day. Making sda5 will trigger the creation of sda4 as the extended partition and so all the empty space can later be added as sda6, sda7...etc. click "write" so that the above partition table become operational on a reboot. If you need extra space use Kanotix's Qtparted program to squeeze sda5 to a smaller size.

(4) Install XP into sda1. XP knows where to find it as it is marked NTFS and will install it as the "C" drive. Make sure XP boots and works satisfactorily before proceeding to the next step.

(5) Install your chosen Linux but must insist it to be install into sda2. The Linux will know how to use the Swap sda3 automatically. When it comes to the location for the boot loader choose "MBR".

Most Linux I know will dual boot XP automatically without the user lifting a finger. If it doesn't lodge a complaint here. Show us the boot loader and we will point a gun at its head to make it do it.
Thanks, that is some great info. I will try that. Is cfdisk a program already intalled in kanotix?
 
Old 03-13-2006, 06:09 AM   #11
saikee
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"cfdisk" can be found in most distros and is one of the best partitioning tools.

Only the Red Hat family that I know would not use it as it got "sfdisk" instead.
 
  


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