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Old 01-17-2017, 12:28 AM   #1
haseem saeed
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Unhappy doubtful about lvm


hi ,

i have a question in my mind about lvm ,as i am new to linux i want you guys to help me out in this..so let me explain

suppose i have created lvm on my hard disk which is of 80gb . i have some data of about 40 gb inside that lv and now i want to reduce that lv from 80 to 60 gb .now the question is, where will my data go ? i mean will it remain in that 60 gb part or it will be divided which i guess should not happen .or the data will be lost ?


thanks in advance ,
Haseem saeed.
 
Old 01-17-2017, 05:41 AM   #2
Jjanel
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Look at: lvresize -r (--resizefs) in man page

Basically, this is often done; if done right, no loss; if done wrong, disaster!
Shrinking the device without first shrinking the filesystem will destroy the filesystem.

Here's a LQ Thread that might be relevant, found from a web-search of:
lvreduce|lvresize tutorial move data

Welcome to LQ! Let us know what you will try or further questions after reading for a while.

p.s. post relevant info, like: pvs;vgs;lvs;lsblk -fp ...etc

Last edited by Jjanel; 01-17-2017 at 06:17 AM.
 
Old 01-17-2017, 07:06 AM   #3
haseem saeed
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Smile "thank you so much"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jjanel View Post
Look at: lvresize -r (--resizefs) in man page

Basically, this is often done; if done right, no loss; if done wrong, disaster!
Shrinking the device without first shrinking the filesystem will destroy the filesystem.
"thank you so much"
it is indeed very informative . but the thing is, i am actually finding something for my own logic. i mean i know for shrinking or for reducing a logical volume you first have to unmount it and then the resizing thing .but what i have asked for is that what will happen with the data i mean on which side it will go .i mean i need the concept and definitely the explanation for it ..
thank you again

Here's a LQ Thread that might be relevant, found from a web-search of:
lvreduce|lvresize tutorial move data

Welcome to LQ! Let us know what you will try or further questions after reading for a while.

p.s. post relevant info, like: pvs;vgs;lvs;lsblk -fp ...etc
"thank you so much"
it is indeed very informative . but the thing is, i am actually finding something for my own logic. i mean i know for shrinking or for reducing a logical volume you first have to unmount it and then the resizing thing .but what i have asked for is that what will happen with the data i mean on which side it will go .i mean i need the concept and definitely the explanation for it ..
thank you again
 
Old 01-18-2017, 09:50 AM   #4
sundialsvcs
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When you resize the volume, one option that's available will (first) resize the file system, thus protecting your data. (Any data that is located in areas of the volume that are about to disappear will be moved out of harm's way.)

In my opinion, you always want to use LVM, and you'll see why the moment that your hard drive fills up.

Without LVM, that's a very messy situation to get out of. With LVM it is easy: just add another physical volume, map it to the appropriate logical pool, and resize the filesystem upward. Done. (And you don't even have to reboot the system.)

LVM separates the logical notion of a "mount point" from the physical resource(s) that correspond to it, allowing the data to be distributed among many physical volumes in various useful ways.

Don't be "doubtful" about this important feature. Use it!

Last edited by sundialsvcs; 01-18-2017 at 09:52 AM.
 
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Old 01-18-2017, 11:51 PM   #5
haseem saeed
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
When you resize the volume, one option that's available will (first) resize the file system, thus protecting your data. (Any data that is located in areas of the volume that are about to disappear will be moved out of harm's way.)

In my opinion, you always want to use LVM, and you'll see why the moment that your hard drive fills up.

Without LVM, that's a very messy situation to get out of. With LVM it is easy: just add another physical volume, map it to the appropriate logical pool, and resize the filesystem upward. Done. (And you don't even have to reboot the system.)

LVM separates the logical notion of a "mount point" from the physical resource(s) that correspond to it, allowing the data to be distributed among many physical volumes in various useful ways.

Don't be "doubtful" about this important feature. Use it!
thanks .definitely i will :-)
 
Old 01-19-2017, 12:25 AM   #6
Jjanel
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Hi again. I hope you have the info you wanted.
>what will happen with the data[?] on which side it will go[?]
It will be moved to the filesystem ['side']. Like Windows <<<<link

I find info like this <<<<link from a web-search of: lvresize move data

By "doubt", I believe you mean "question" (not disbelieve).

Best wishes! Your questions are welcome; feel free to ask!

p.s. IF resolved, please use ThreadTools, at top, to mark '[SOLVED]'.

Last edited by Jjanel; 01-19-2017 at 12:33 AM.
 
  


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